Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-17-2016, 12:29 PM   #21
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docsgsxr View Post
It would work unless you had a compressor or regulator issue. If you had it pressurized, went to the store and it leaked, it could flood your rig.

The 12v pump is more of an "on demand" style. It turns on when it senses a drop in pressure. Other than that specific time, it doesn't run.

Just a thought.......
Doc, that's the same style of operation as and air solenoid valve. If it sensed and drop in pressure the valve kicks on the air compressor. In both the electric pump and air compressor, if there is a pressure drop due to a leak they both would kick on and stay on trying to re-pressurize the system. No difference.
dgorila1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 03:36 PM   #22
Bus Nut
 
Docsgsxr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Arizona via Baton Rouge
Posts: 640
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freight-shaker (Freightliner)
Engine: Cat 3126b 250 HP
Rated Cap: Only 1 seat
True, but a pump doesn't put nearly the pressure a compressor would, or at least I don't think it would.

I am also comparing in my mind, drinking a milkshake through a straw using your mouth as a vacuum and pressurizing the same glass with an IR, 80 gal, 175 psi, 3 phase compressor, wide open so you don't have to apply human force!!!
__________________
My build thread - viewtopic.php?f=9&t=467197
Docsgsxr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 03:47 PM   #23
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Virginia
Posts: 446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docsgsxr View Post
True, but a pump doesn't put nearly the pressure a compressor would, or at least I don't think it would.

I am also comparing in my mind, drinking a milkshake through a straw using your mouth as a vacuum and pressurizing the same glass with an IR, 80 gal, 175 psi, 3 phase compressor, wide open so you don't have to apply human force!!!
That's what the regulator valve is for, to reduce the pressure so it isn't too much. You could have 1000psi (exaggeration of course) coming into the valve but if it was set at 50psi that's all that would be going out to the system.
dgorila1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 06:48 PM   #24
Skoolie
 
Skoolydoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Ft. Smith Arkansas
Posts: 141
Rated Cap: 2+1
Just wondering, isn't normal city water set at about 7lbs.?
__________________
Don and Ellen
Plus one fuzzy faced kid (Poopcee)
Skoolydoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 07:33 PM   #25
Skoolie
 
jester's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: onboard the R1!
Posts: 206
Year: 2004
Coachwork: International
Chassis: RE200
Engine: 7.3L Navistar T444E
Rated Cap: 72
not sure but my take is that water pump puts much more energybehind the water than an air backed system. water stores much more energy when compressed than air, if not then hydraulics would be....airdraulics? plus wouldn't you have to worry x2 about leaks? after you pressured it up, you'd have the entire tank to faucet at pressure, even fill tube?? instead of only the line from pump to accumulator to faucet/s. what about venting when filling the tank of air backed system??
jester is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 08:32 PM   #26
Bus Nut
 
Jolly Roger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: North carolina
Posts: 651
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford
Engine: Detroit 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
I started a whole long message and ran out of battery, sorry?
1 or 10 pumps will not change the pressure.
Whatever your highest pump pressure is whether it is in the bus or under the bus is what your incoming pressure is.
If your pump does 60-psi after all of Your piping size/twist/turns/elbows/types of sink faucets/shower valve and shower head, water heater and whatever you will lose pressure.
Most city water is between 40-60
IMO put a shut off valve in your tank vent line and once the tank is full close the valve and force the water up to your fixtures that way your pump is primed and the air is out and you know the water is there.
Most 12v water pumps have a check valve and if working properly they will not let the water drain back to wherever.
With that being said wherever your pump is you need a drain in the lowest point on the leaving side of the pump to drain the house side of the pump because of the check valve/back check does not drain anything after the pump and I can only reccomend a tee with a valve to vent the entering side of the pump or the piping will hold the water in a vacuum and won't drain back to your tank. On the leaving side you can open the fixtures to vent/break the vacuum but because of the check valve in/at the pump you need a dedicated drain at the lowest point. Probably at the pump.
Might be good I got cut off earlier
Because of my work I was a lot more technical
Jolly Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 08:33 PM   #27
Bus Nut
 
Jolly Roger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: North carolina
Posts: 651
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford
Engine: Detroit 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
I started a whole long message and ran out of battery, sorry?
1 or 10 pumps will not change the pressure.
Whatever your highest pump pressure is whether it is in the bus or under the bus is what your incoming pressure is.
If your pump does 60-psi after all of Your piping size/twist/turns/elbows/types of sink faucets/shower valve and shower head, water heater and whatever you will lose pressure.
Most city water is between 40-60
IMO put a shut off valve in your tank vent line and once the tank is full close the valve and force the water up to your fixtures that way your pump is primed and the air is out and you know the water is there.
Most 12v water pumps have a check valve and if working properly they will not let the water drain back to wherever.
With that being said wherever your pump is you need a drain in the lowest point on the leaving side of the pump to drain the house side of the pump because of the check valve/back check does not drain anything after the pump and I can only reccomend a tee with a valve to vent the entering side of the pump or the piping will hold the water in a vacuum and won't drain back to your tank. On the leaving side you can open the fixtures to vent/break the vacuum but because of the check valve in/at the pump you need a dedicated drain at the lowest point. Probably at the pump.
Might be good I got cut off earlier
Because of my work I was a lot more technical
Jolly Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 10:22 PM   #28
Bus Crazy
 
Stu & Filo. T's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Vacaville, Ca
Posts: 1,521
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Crown / Pusher
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skoolydoo View Post
Just wondering, isn't normal city water set at about 7lbs.?
Our is 40 psi.
Stu & Filo. T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 10:45 PM   #29
Skoolie
 
Skoolydoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Ft. Smith Arkansas
Posts: 141
Rated Cap: 2+1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu & Filo. T View Post
Our is 40 psi.
It could be city Gas I was thinking of.
__________________
Don and Ellen
Plus one fuzzy faced kid (Poopcee)
Skoolydoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2016, 10:58 PM   #30
Bus Geek
 
Robin97396's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Willamina, Oregon
Posts: 4,926
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC 1000
Engine: 5.9
Send a message via Yahoo to Robin97396
Natural gas is usually about 4 lbs. Incidentally most beer taps are set at between 4 and 7 pounds, and most of us are familiar with a trickle the speed of a beer tap. It's a good way to conserve water, but a icky way to take a shower.

I think you guys are thinking about one of those systems that pressurizes the steel or fiberglass tank, rather than your whole water supply?
Robin97396 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.