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Old 03-20-2016, 02:25 PM   #41
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Dispensing home brew was the reason I purchased 12 ball lock pepsi kegs. I've only had beer in 4 kegs at a time, but the others have proven useful for many things. If there's kids around I make carbonated drinks or carbonated water. So I often have four kegs in use, four kegs of sanitizer water andfour kegs for water/rinse storage.

If you can't see into the bottom of your water tank you might be surprised at what gathers or settles there. Even my 55 gallon drum is showing slight signs of sediment, but it is a white drum. These kegs are completely cleanable and much easier to move around than a 55 gallon drum.

Yeah, I'm still keeping my water storage inside. It's just cold enough here to freeze the plumbing over the winter and I'm still pretty fond of the idea of at least visiting Alaska again.
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Old 03-20-2016, 03:23 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dan-fox View Post
No; I hadn't picked up on your putting water in your beer kegs. No reason not to; it's as good a way as any to deliver water. Make sure your tap handles are properly labeled.

My grandmother was a teetotaler who used whiskey, honey, and lemon juice in equal proportions to cure any number of ailments, but washed her hair conventionally.
For me it was called a hot totty and it cured dang near anything I got in east texas as a kid.
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Old 03-20-2016, 03:26 PM   #43
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Oh come on... that's just the old fashioned Nyquil. It made you go to sleep.
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Old 03-20-2016, 03:48 PM   #44
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But cheaper and mom and dad have an excuse for it being in the cabinet
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Old 03-20-2016, 03:49 PM   #45
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Don't need an excuse. If it makes you feel better, it's medicinal. All things taken in moderation.
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Old 03-20-2016, 04:29 PM   #46
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Back to the original subject. A regular rv pump will pressurize the lines at 40-55 psi
So to get the same results with an air compressor, you would have to pressurize your fresh water tank to that same amount. I don't know what kind of tanks you are using, I have regular white RV style fresh tanks. There is no way I would trust them at any pressure over atmospheric.
I would think you would need a tank designed for the higher pressure and also your fill spout and hosing would have to be able to take the pressure.
This all drives the cost up...
Just my 2 cents
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Old 03-20-2016, 05:42 PM   #47
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I'd say you're absolutely correct sir. I wouldn't attempt to pressurize your tanks either. They're not made for it. An RV pump pressurizes a small tank that can withstand those pressures.

I was responding to a previous question about pressurizing tanks. I agree, I wouldn't carry a water tank pressurized at 45-55 psi. That was your input. You're only reading part of the thread. I recommended 4-7 psi to push water out of the tanks.
The implication was that some tanks could withstand a modest amount of pressure. A square plastic tank is going to break, or at least take less pressure than a cylindrical tank. Either way I'd never pressurize a system to the extent you're talking about. Plug in a garden hose if you want that kind of pressure and flow. I don't want to deal that much grey water every time someone takes a shower. This is a bus, not a mobile home.

I'm not saying you're wrong in any way. I'm saying we likely have very differing goals for what we want our buses to be. I like simple. I don't mind a hand pump for water, or heating it on the wood stove.

Pressurizing my system is a subject learned from home brewing and keging beer. If you carry an indoor water supply to avoid freezing in the winter kegs are a nice way to go. It's only 5 gallons per keg but it does flow about the speed of a beer tap. Makes a lousy shower.
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Old 03-20-2016, 06:49 PM   #48
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Actually did read the whole thread, you are right we are expecting different things from our builds. I am building mine so I can stay in it as long as I like. Currently I have 2 tanks (26g ea) and an rv pump, very simple. I usually go 3-4 days before I run low. My wife and I both get a shower out of it. I have never hooked up to city water or a hose.
As for draining grey water, I have 2 40g holding tanks with another on its way.
When I'm finished building, I'll have over 100g fresh water.
If I was doing day trips, I would consider the pressure tank idea.
Up until a year ago I was using the 15 1/2 gal keg with co2 for my beer (doc says I can't do that anymore)
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Old 03-20-2016, 07:04 PM   #49
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Darned doctors. What do they know?
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Old 03-21-2016, 09:33 AM   #50
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Perhaps we should split the homebrew thing off into its own thread.

So do you ferment in the pepsi kegs, or ferment in a conventional carboy and decant into the pepsi keg and artificially carbonate, or ????
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