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Old 03-21-2016, 09:35 AM   #51
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And it would be a creative reading of the law to characterize a 5 gallon keg & tap setup as an "open container", cops are known for their creative reading of the law when it suits them to do so. Any worries/stories about driving around with a keg/tap/dispenser in a vehicle?
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Old 03-21-2016, 09:50 AM   #52
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And it would be a creative reading of the law to characterize a 5 gallon keg & tap setup as an "open container", cops are known for their creative reading of the law when it suits them to do so. Any worries/stories about driving around with a keg/tap/dispenser in a vehicle?
Well, if said vehicle is titled an RV/Motorhome, then there needs to be a warrant issued. Anything else, probable cause
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Old 03-21-2016, 02:24 PM   #53
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This is actually about the validity of pushing water to a tap utilizing a keg system. I do prefer a hand pump drawing from an external tank. During freezing weather I intend to drain the external tank and use kegs stored inside.

That said, I ferment in carboys and age in corny kegs. You can't push all the beer out of the keg unless you have co2, or you could ladle it out of the keg. Fermentation times vary with different yeasts, ingredients and temperatures. Visually seeing the fermentation process in the carboy is the best way I've found to know how the wort is maturing.
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Old 03-21-2016, 02:39 PM   #54
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An RV pump pressurizes a small tank that can withstand those pressures.
Dunno what kind of pump your referring to, but the typical 12 v 55 psi 3 gpm shurflo doesn't pressurize the tank, it draws a vacuum on it. It pressurizes the line in front of it.

That's the kind I'm intending to use, that way if it breaks, small puddle under it versus big @$$ pressurized water mess in the cabin. I am not using fiberboard cabinets, but would still like my wood non waterlogged....

Just sayin'!
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Old 03-21-2016, 03:11 PM   #55
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The way you're doing it sounds fine. Some systems have a small pressure tank in the water line between the pump and the faucet. It's roughly as big as a basket ball. The tank works like the pressure tanks used over well pumps, but much smaller.
I'm not reinventing anything here. This system I'm describing is something that has been used in RVs in the past. I know some people still use them in RVs.
You're not making a logical argument because you keep reverting to the thought of pressurizing your entire water tank. Don't do that. We all know and have established that's not a smart idea unless your tank can withstand pressurization. Beyond that, you should do whatever you're comfortable with. As with everything there is a learning curve.
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Old 03-21-2016, 03:50 PM   #56
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It's called an accumulator. And those are for systems where the pump has issues with losing prime.
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Old 03-21-2016, 03:53 PM   #57
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I was planning on either a 4 or 6 inch diameter accumulator somewhere in the cabin to help with water pressure
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Old 03-21-2016, 04:29 PM   #58
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It's just an available system that was used in RVs. I agree, if I was to use an electric pump I'd set it up simply like yours. I simply use a hand pump.

I haven't pressurized any of my larger tanks but it would make an interesting experiment. This winter I left several large tanks outside to freeze while full of water. I don't know why they didn't break but 5 tanks and no leaks. Those tanks might be good candidates for low pressure water access, but only for an outside tank. I don't think my tanks would rupture with 7 or 8 lbs of pressure, but I'll have to let you know sometime in the future.
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Old 03-21-2016, 05:11 PM   #59
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I ferment in carboys and age in corny kegs. You can't push all the beer out of the keg unless you have co2, or you could ladle it out of the keg. Fermentation times vary with different yeasts, ingredients and temperatures. Visually seeing the fermentation process in the carboy is the best way I've found to know how the wort is maturing.
So do you or don't you prime your after fermentation is complete? Shut me up if this is too far off topic.
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Old 03-21-2016, 05:32 PM   #60
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Yes, I use the standard co2 mix to push beer out of a keg. It's nearly neutral to the natural carbonation in beer and really doesn't add much fizz. You can get about 1/3 of a keg out under natural pressure, and with corny kegs you can pop the top and pour if necessary. That's what I call and open container.
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