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Old 03-27-2009, 08:51 PM   #1
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spinning those wrenches

hi i was thinking that a good thread to start would be mechanical talk. notspecialized to any part of the bus but all areas in general this could include such subjects as brakework,wiper moter changes taillight and vehicle wiring,tuneup tips,exhaust tips,injector talk,engine talk,clutch,cooling,and anything else that would come up.people know tricks and like to learn/share them.what do you all think? timbuk
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Old 03-28-2009, 08:34 AM   #2
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Re: spinning those wrenches

I'm game. I know some tricks of my own and I'm ALWAYS looking for new ways to make work quicker. The quicker I work the more jobs I get done and the more jobs I get done the more money I make.
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Old 03-28-2009, 01:26 PM   #3
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Re: spinning those wrenches

some times it aint about the money either just gettin er done and having time for other things likeusing your bus instead of a bunch of head scratchin and ive scratched my head lots-got no hair! this would be a great thread!
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Old 03-28-2009, 07:56 PM   #4
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Re: spinning those wrenches

Well let me start by listing 5 absolutely indispensable tools that prevent much aggravation for me.

1. Quality ratchets. My tools are my bread and butter and I can tell you there is no more important tool to me. There is nothing worse than banging yourself up when a tool breaks, not to mention having to deal with getting a new one. I happen to be a Snap-On guy, but there are many other quality units out there. I've found eBay to be a great source. I've very rarely broken a socket, even cheap ones, but I've shredded my fair share of ratchets (I actually got to the point where I had five 3/8 drive Craftsman ratchets just so I could finish a project). I do have to say that the polished "Next Gen" Craftsman ratchets are nice and I really like the 60? tooth count.

2. An assortment of hammers. It's a sad reality when wrenching that an awful lot of stuff is going to have to be beat to smitherings to get it apart. You can never have too many hammers of all shapes and sizes with ballpeins being the most prevalent in the automotive field. The very best hammers I've ever owned is a five piece set from Harbor Freight (item number 39217-5VGA) of all places. I think I paid $17 for the set. The fiberglass handles have held up GREAT and there is the right size for most jobs, save for a true BFH, but everyone should have one of those anyway.

3. An impact wrench. Contrary to popular belief it has been my experience that an impact is LESS likely to break stuff than hand tools. In fact, one of my favorite techniques for getting brake bleeders loose is to put my impact on them with it at its lowest setting and just let it sit there and gently hammer at an idle. If you hammer them of course they're going to snap right off, but using the right technique I've never broken one using the impact, but I've stripped and broken plenty by hand. As far as impacts go you need to buy what you can afford, but get as much gun for the money as you can. I'm a HUGE fan of Aircat air tools. They come in quite a bit cheaper than Chicago Pneumatic or Ingersol Rand, but have all the power of those big names and they're QUIET. My half inch impact is an Aircat Nitrocat 1000-TC and I love it. I think they can be had off eBay for less than $200. For the biggest, baddest half inch gun out there I think you can't go wrong with an IR 2135Ti. Those suckers have SNORT! But they're also loud and $300 or more. A CP734 or IR231 are classic steel body workhorse guns.

4. A torch. There is nothing that a torch can't disassemble. When all else fails heat will most likely get something apart or burn it out. It really is an impossible tool to avoid if you're going to do any automotive work on old stuff (or new stuff in the rust belt!). You don't need one of the big torch setups for casual use. One of the small caddy torches works great. It just isn't cost effective in the long run for heavy use. Even a MAPP gas torch is better than nothing. Also, when shopping for a torch setup you might want to look at an oxy-propane setup. These are very cost effective given the price difference of propane and acetylene. They perform very much on par with oxy-acetylene for all purposes other than welding.

5. Good safety gear. It's easy to neglect safety gear until something bad happens. The most important thing I've found is getting PPE that is comfortable. If it's comfortable I'll use it. If not I won't. It's just that simple. I have a great pair of muffs that I will use with any air tool other than my Aircat. I can't stand safety glasses so I have a full face shield that I wear anytime I'm cutting, grinding, risk breaking/shattering a part, taking apart a pressurized system, whatever. The added benefit of a full face shield is that...well...it protects your whole face. Gloves can't be overlooked either. A heavy duty pair of leather gloves might save your fingers. Rubber gloves will prevent a lot of burns from hot liquids or chemicals. Form fitting work gloves will prevent busted knuckles and pinches. Finally, a good pair of work shows is absolutely necessary. I have a pair of $30 steel toe boots from Dunham Sports that I wear day in and day out. They are anti-skid, support my ankle, and offer crush protection. I've done a lot of stupid stuff in my day, but every injury and scar convinces me a little more the value of protecting what you have. You only have one body and a lot of times you only have one chance!
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Old 03-28-2009, 09:50 PM   #5
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Re: spinning those wrenches

and mthere you go already a wealth of knowledge posted here already looks like this would be a great forum im a headin to canadian tire tomorrow to but a couple of hydraulic jacks 40% off gonna get a 20 and a 12 gotta pull the duallys and the axles and put in new wheel clyinders im bettin that if the fronts were near impossible to pull off(days,heat,sore back) these rears should be a nightmare
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Old 03-28-2009, 10:40 PM   #6
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Re: spinning those wrenches

I was so confused the first time I walked into a Canadian Tire. It seemed that about the only thing they DIDN'T have was tires.
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Old 03-29-2009, 09:32 PM   #7
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Re: spinning those wrenches

hammers, I like to use a big hammer, i can always choke up and tap easy but you can't make a little hammer hit big, 2 oz ball pein for delicate work,2 1/2 pound mini sledge with 18" fiberglass handle, 10# sledge with 18" handle, 12# and 20# sledges for serious work. brass,plastic,rubber and deadblow hammers also all have appropriate uses.

for axle/brake work on duals, a piece of heavy sheetmetal and liquid soap or lube to slide the tires and hub assembly on and off the axle saves a lot of physical work, jack up and support the frame so that the tires are still on the ground, loosen the axleshaft bolts, hit the end of the shaft with a sledge to pop the flange and wedges loose then remove the axle hardware and shaft, jack the tires up just enuff to slide the lubed sheet steel under the tires, lower the axle untill the tires just touch the steel, remove the wheel bearing nuts and tab washers, slide the wheel,hub,drum assy off of the axle, service the brakes and bearings and reassemble in the reverse order.

a scoop shovel is a handy way to lever tires up onto the hub/drum without leaving your fingernails behind if your not tire shop trained and equiped.

PPE, gloves, kevlar hi temp gloves are great for dry heat, but WARNING, they trap wet heat against your skin, do not wear them while working with hot liquids.
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Old 03-29-2009, 09:59 PM   #8
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Re: spinning those wrenches

TOOLS... I NEED MORE TOOLS!!! And a concrete floor to work on.... My gravel driveway is really getting to me...
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Old 03-29-2009, 10:31 PM   #9
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Re: spinning those wrenches

Quote:
Originally Posted by the_experience03
I was so confused the first time I walked into a Canadian Tire. It seemed that about the only thing they DIDN'T have was tires.
i'm a big fan of canadian tire. I don't think there is a similar store here in the US, at least not near where i live.
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Old 03-29-2009, 10:56 PM   #10
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Re: spinning those wrenches

I like 6-point sockets.
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