Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-02-2009, 09:35 PM   #1
Bus Geek
 
the_experience03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Saint James, MN
Posts: 2,669
Send a message via MSN to the_experience03 Send a message via Yahoo to the_experience03
Re: Suggested/helpful skills

Most community/technical schools will offer either a Circuits 1 in the engineering/physics department or a basic automotive electrical class in the technical program. Both are very similar in subject matter. A genuine understanding of Ohm's Law, and basic circuit components and layouts will prove to be invaluable to you. I would recommend the Circuits 1 class over the auto one simply for the fact that it could potentially be transferable as a science elective, something not likely with the technical program class. I've done both.
__________________
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/...09f20d39_m.jpg
Skooling it...one state at a time...
the_experience03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2009, 12:12 AM   #2
Skoolie
 
sportyrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: mid Mo.
Posts: 241
Year: 1976
Coachwork: bluebird
Chassis: F33695
Engine: 427 chevy
Rated Cap: 84
Re: Suggested/helpful skills

Someones dad down the street can teach you engines a little at a time, put that low on your priority list. As far as electrical you need to learn all you can. Welding will be sorely needed if you are going to go very far on your skoolie and someones dad can teach you that if necessary but schooling would be better. Don't shy away from stick welding, once you learn that and how to watch a puddle you can master MIG fairly easy, then TIG, stick is the foundation you build on for all other kinds of welding. TIG won't be needed on a skoolie and is for specialty welding of aluminum, magnesium, and stainless which I don't see you getting into in your early years. Electrical, welding, machine shop, HVAC, plumbing, pipe fitting, heavy equipment, things like these take cubic hours of time and bookwork to learn and a good teacher to boot but enthusiasm will make it all seem easy and go fast. Anything that unions have apprenticeship programs for is usually a 4 year program because it takes that long to learn what you are doing, hence the "Journeyman" card. Don't think you will ace any of these things in a few months, you have to start at the bottom and put in your dues to be good at anything worthwhile. It's a shame that here in America you go to college or flip burgers, the middle ground is gone, but will be back some day through demand. sportyrick, welder and machinist for 40 years, my specialty is making chicken salad out of chicken ****.
sportyrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2009, 02:31 AM   #3
Bus Geek
 
the_experience03's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Saint James, MN
Posts: 2,669
Send a message via MSN to the_experience03 Send a message via Yahoo to the_experience03
Re: Suggested/helpful skills

FWIW, I'd be more than happy to help you along with basic electrical theory. Getting it down is cool because then you can start to play with just basic things and make cool stuff happen. Point and case is early 90's GM car turn signals. During the day the front ones alternate between the corner marker and the parking light so they stand out more, but at night when the headlights are on the backfeed through the circuit makes them flash simultaneously. You wouldn't BELIEVE what a guy can do with relays. Some of the coolest features like keyless entry (check out Jason's (Lapeer20m) jacuzzi buses) are accomplished through relatively simple means.
__________________
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/...09f20d39_m.jpg
Skooling it...one state at a time...
the_experience03 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2009, 10:02 PM   #4
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: downriver, detroit mi
Posts: 794
Re: Suggested/helpful skills

I'd go with a basic circuits electrical course, like previously mentioned once you understand the basics you can work out the rest either 12vDC or 120vAC, their's ohms law and about 10 other laws/rules and the ability to use a calculator and VOM.

welding is 5% knowledge and 95% practice, a realy good basic course will teach ou how to light and adjust an oxy acetelyne torch. make a puddle,travel the puddle and then add filler metal with your other hand, once you can do that you will learn how to strike an arc with a stick welder,start your puddle and travel the puddle while maintaining the arc and adding filler from the sacrificial electrode, tig welding is like ocy acetelyne except you use an electric torch instead of a gas torch, strike an arc start a puddle,travel the puddle while adding filler metal with the other hand. mig welding you turn the machine on grab the handle touch the wire to where you want to start and pull the trigger, &travel the puddle.
that's the basics, you have to play with the machine adjustments and practice, the advantage to taking a course is that you don't have to invest in equipment until tou decide if welding is something that your comfortable doing
FYI just so you can't say no one told me, if you melt steel at 2300f sooner or later your going to touch something hot and get burned

a good basic mechanical maintainece course will be more beneficial than an diesel course.
paul iossi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2009, 09:44 PM   #5
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Savage, MN
Posts: 472
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International
Engine: 7.3 diesel
Rated Cap: 14
Re: Suggested/helpful skills

I didn't learn anything in any school in regards to what i havwe done to the bus. Just kinda made it up as I went along. And when in doubt, internet searches to get some pointers. Internet search can help on what to do if your engine gives you trouble. Lots of good forums out there, you just have to find them.

As for welding equipment when I was looking to buy a nice wire feed mig I was told by an older guy "buy small buy twice" So I didn't buy some cheap unit at the local Northertool. I ended up buying a Millermatic 210 with a large cylinder.
Here's a web site I can across to pick up some useful information on welding. There is a forum there and you don't have to register to read all you what. http://weldingweb.com
wmah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2009, 10:02 PM   #6
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: downriver, detroit mi
Posts: 794
Re: Suggested/helpful skills

i have a hobart 210 and love it for what i do, but it's way more machine than you need to do a roof lift or anything else on a bus except for heavy fab like frame mods or hitches. If you go with a 110 to 140 series 110v unit you can use it anywhere and if you get into something to big for your machine you can always cut and fit and tack your pieces together and then either have someone with a bigger machine stick it together or borrow some time on a buddy's bigger machine.
paul iossi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2009, 08:08 AM   #7
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: downriver, detroit mi
Posts: 794
Re: Suggested/helpful skills

I've found that my local welding supply gives me the best deal on consumables. IIRC new 120 tank $110, free first fill and exchange it for a new or almost new tank for the cost of the fill' no hydro test fees or rental fees ever. I also but 10 lb spools of wire and always keep a spare on hand because you only run out of wire at 10:00 on friday nite of a holiday weekend. I've also found that the abrasive supplies, cutting and grinding wheels are slightly more expensive but last much longer and are theirfore a better value.

I also have to say that this is not the first welding supply that I've dealt with, the first guy was a jerk, lots of talk and poor service, so shop around.
paul iossi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Suggested Regular Maintenance? TygerCub International | Navistar Drivetrain 3 05-22-2012 10:50 AM
A few helpful design changes kirkndopp Skoolie Conversion Projects 1 05-11-2011 09:12 AM
Helpful for the Hood Abbott Everything Else | General Skoolie Discussions 16 06-08-2010 07:39 PM
Carpentry skills BUSBOZO Conversion General Discussions 15 01-03-2010 09:14 AM
Helpful links does not work. crazycal Forum Admin | Account Help | Suggestion Box 0 10-11-2007 05:45 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.