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Old 04-26-2016, 12:24 PM   #21
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At a minimum get two really good front tires. The others can wait. I just happened to be able to afford the tires at the time and figured I wouldn't be able to afford it under normal financial conditions.
I ruined a front wheel and tire on the way home when I picked up my bus. There was no spare so I removed one of the duels and put it on the front. At the time I was only a couple miles from home, but I obviously had to drive back to town to get the tires. I wouldn't do it while carrying a heavy load, but there were no problems and it drove ok on five tires.
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Old 04-26-2016, 12:33 PM   #22
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I agree with Robin. On automobiles, most safety "experts" recommend the best tires go on the rear claiming the steering will overcome a front blowout. Not the same on a bus, especially with duallies. The bus's higher center of gravity makes front blowouts more dangerous than those on the rear. And with duallies, the likelihood of losing both tires on one side are quite slim. So keep your steering tires in good shape. Truckers routinely run re-treads...but never on the front.
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Old 04-26-2016, 12:36 PM   #23
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I think im going to just take the easy and safe way out.

before I drive my bus the 1100 miles home, im just going to get 6 Brand new tires for it...

so I should ask then... what brand / type are good tires that will last?

biggest hurdle will be finding a shop that has locations in florida and ohio, so I can get a warranty that covers me.. unless commercial tires dont have warranty.. I never bought em before...

-Christopher
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Old 04-26-2016, 12:56 PM   #24
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Noise!

Our bus had Michelin on the front when we first bought it. We replaced them with Power King Navigators.

Wish we had of spent more for less noise. These aren't real bad but not real good either.
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:00 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
I agree with Robin. On automobiles, most safety "experts" recommend the best tires go on the rear claiming the steering will overcome a front blowout. Not the same on a bus, especially with duallies. The bus's higher center of gravity makes front blowouts more dangerous than those on the rear. And with duallies, the likelihood of losing both tires on one side are quite slim. So keep your steering tires in good shape. Truckers routinely run re-treads...but never on the front.

Great point. Also love your classic bus. It was born just a couple of years befofe me, I'm a 1949 model.
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:06 PM   #26
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Thanks Shortstuff. Unfortunately (for me), my bus is a year younger than I am.
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:13 PM   #27
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Thanks Shortstuff. Unfortunately (for me), my bus is a year younger than I am.
Tango we have to look on the bright side and think of the alternative to getting old, thers only one ya know .

Our shorty looks like a prison bus, but thats a good thing for me although hubby wanted to flash it out I even considered drawing bars on the windows. Nobody bothers us including cops.
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Old 04-26-2016, 01:26 PM   #28
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When it comes to tires, if you have two people together talking about them you are going to have at least three opinions. All three of which will most likely have some value.

IMHO, the cost difference between a recap and a virgin is not enough to be worth the difference since you are going to time out before you wear out your tires. And with a recap you are starting with a time disadvantage since they are not new.

IMHO, the cost difference between name brands and cheap Chinese knockoffs is not worth the price since again, you are going to time out before you wear out your tires.

The most important thing is to purchase tires that are of a common size that is large enough to carry the load your bus will be carrying. The more common the size the more likely it will be to find a replacement when you are at the back of beyond somewhere and you need to replace a tire.
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Old 04-26-2016, 02:52 PM   #29
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I ended up with chinese brand "Triangle" tires because of the exact logic listed from @cowlitzcoach.

They seem to be good enough. Not cheap - about $350 a tire, but are considered all position tires and had a mid year 2015 date code when I bought them at the end of 2015, which tells me the supply chain works rather well. I roll the bus around every couple weeks to keep the flat spot off the tires - and all the driving I've had on them feels fine. Mostly highway and some curvy back road stuff. Drives like...a truck? I guess.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowlitzcoach View Post
When it comes to tires, if you have two people together talking about them you are going to have at least three opinions. All three of which will most likely have some value.

IMHO, the cost difference between a recap and a virgin is not enough to be worth the difference since you are going to time out before you wear out your tires. And with a recap you are starting with a time disadvantage since they are not new.

IMHO, the cost difference between name brands and cheap Chinese knockoffs is not worth the price since again, you are going to time out before you wear out your tires.

The most important thing is to purchase tires that are of a common size that is large enough to carry the load your bus will be carrying. The more common the size the more likely it will be to find a replacement when you are at the back of beyond somewhere and you need to replace a tire.
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Old 04-26-2016, 03:41 PM   #30
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$350 is pretty close to what I paid for name brand tires. I know I'll never wear out these commercial tires and I also know it's kind of a waist of money, but good name brand tires make me feel a lot more secure. I don't have my security blanket anymore.
I thought the Chinese tires were about $200 apiece?
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