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Old 06-18-2019, 08:12 PM   #1
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What does "air to air" and "engine brake" mean?

I'm looking at a bus for sale and it lists:

Air to Air: Yes
Engine Brake: No

What do these refer to? Thanks!
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Old 06-18-2019, 08:26 PM   #2
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Probably air suspension, air brakes. It does not have a "jake brake" type system to use engine brake pressure to slow the motor.
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Old 06-18-2019, 11:40 PM   #3
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It may refer to the intercooler. poor description.
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Old 06-19-2019, 06:13 AM   #4
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A turbocharger intercooler is referred to as an air to air unit. An engine brake or Jake brake is an exhaust braking system equipped on big rigs and larger engines.
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Old 06-19-2019, 06:25 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaivgrant View Post
I'm looking at a bus for sale and it lists:

Air to Air: Yes
Engine Brake: No

What do these refer to? Thanks!
air to air sounds like a charge air cooler to me.
And most school buses have no engine brake. Engine brake is a jake brake.
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Old 06-19-2019, 10:33 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaivgrant View Post
I'm looking at a bus for sale and it lists:

Air to Air: Yes
Engine Brake: No

What do these refer to? Thanks!
Sorry, EastCoast, misread your post as someone else's the first time. I second EastCoastCB. Sounds like a turbocharged engine with an air-to-air intercooler. Some are water-to-air. Some more specific info on the bus in question would be helpful.

Engine brake is basically a setup that reduces engine power on certain cylinders, as with a rev limiter. This allows the driver to use the engine and transmission to slow the vehicle on hills, making it easier and safer to control, as overusing the brakes will cause them to overheat and fail. Nice to have, but not common on skoolies, I'm afraid, as most were not intended for mountain driving.

There are different types of auxiliary braking devices as well. Some solely use exhaust pressure, some are internal to the trans, others have an actual brake that clamps down on the crankshaft / balancer. Obviously the exhaust brake is the most common.
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Old 06-19-2019, 10:44 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaivgrant View Post
I'm looking at a bus for sale and it lists:



Air to Air: Yes

Engine Brake: No



What do these refer to? Thanks!
—-//
When I was going through the air breaks diagrams, I read about the engine brake. I thought they were not allowed in everyday vehicles and especially in residential neighborhoods because of the loud noise it makes. But from what I recall it is to slow down the engine. I can’t see why a bus would have that, only big, huge equipment and rigs would need something of that caliber. Could it be a typo, maybe he meant to say air brakes?
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Old 06-19-2019, 10:54 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Dèsirée View Post
—-//
When I was going through the air breaks diagrams, I read about the engine brake. I thought they were not allowed in everyday vehicles and especially in residential neighborhoods because of the loud noise it makes. But from what I recall it is to slow down the engine. I can’t see why a bus would have that, only big, huge equipment and rigs would need something of that caliber. Could it be a typo, maybe he meant to say air brakes?
Nope, doubt it's a typo. Engine brakes are an option on some commercial vehicles below Class 8. Engine brakes in and of themselves are not noisy. The ones you notice are straight-piped Billy BigRiggers that like to hear their engine over everything else. Every Class 8 truck built has had an engine brake for years, and none of them I drove were loud at all.

But as a driver of such trucks, for those who complain about loud engine brakes... They're not as loud as a loaded big rig crashing into your living room or running over your car. Most people who drive conventional vehicles have no clue how dangerous those trucks are, and when you pull out in front of them, we can either wake up the neighborhood with the engine brake, or we can run you over. Your choice.

Engine brakes are there to supplement the foundation brakes, and save them for when we REALLY need to stop, like your kid running out into the road after a ball, for example. They need a lot more space to stop and turn than you think. I would think most people on this site would have learned that by now, as most skoolies are in essence a medium-duty truck chassis with a bus body on it. Personally, I think the straight-piped growl of an exhaust brake helps to give a little extra warning that you just pulled out in front of something that's a lot bigger than you. Just my $0.02
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Old 06-19-2019, 11:23 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post
Nope, doubt it's a typo. Engine brakes are an option on some commercial vehicles below Class 8. Engine brakes in and of themselves are not noisy. The ones you notice are straight-piped Billy BigRiggers that like to hear their engine over everything else. Every Class 8 truck built has had an engine brake for years, and none of them I drove were loud at all.

But as a driver of such trucks, for those who complain about loud engine brakes... They're not as loud as a loaded big rig crashing into your living room or running over your car. Most people who drive conventional vehicles have no clue how dangerous those trucks are, and when you pull out in front of them, we can either wake up the neighborhood with the engine brake, or we can run you over. Your choice.

Engine brakes are there to supplement the foundation brakes, and save them for when we REALLY need to stop, like your kid running out into the road after a ball, for example. They need a lot more space to stop and turn than you think. I would think most people on this site would have learned that by now, as most skoolies are in essence a medium-duty truck chassis with a bus body on it. Personally, I think the straight-piped growl of an exhaust brake helps to give a little extra warning that you just pulled out in front of something that's a lot bigger than you. Just my $0.02
—-/
Quite an education I just got from cheese wagon... and worth a lot more than a silver dollar!
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Old 06-19-2019, 11:25 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dèsirée View Post
—-/
Quite an education I just got from cheese wagon... and worth a lot more than a silver dollar!
Not to mention the only dime those trucks, or these skoolies for that matter, might be able to stop on, is the one in your pocket...
Your Braking Distance - OUR Braking Distance.jpg
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