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bluebird90 03-09-2015 11:39 PM

Running gas lines inside
 
I'm at the point in the build where I am installing the LP lines. most of the time the main lines are run outside, but I have come to an issue with undercarriage stuff interfering. what are your opinions on running some of the black line inside?

lornaschinske 03-10-2015 12:20 AM

I have an 8 ft section of back iron pipe running inside from the fireplace on top of the front wheel well to under the galley sink, where it turns to go back under the floor. Couldn't run the line under the floor as the fuel tank was in the way.

taskswap 03-10-2015 09:18 AM

Houses have black pipe and yellow flex pipe all over the place. There's nothing wrong with it - you just have to know that it's a risk and it's better if you can do it outside. I mean, the APPLIANCE is inside, so the gas is coming into the space eventually, right? You're just trying to minimize the risk.

Buy a gas detector. These things are cheap on eBay and there are all different kinds. I've never used this one but you can tell if they're working - just hit the valve on a disposable lighter near it - it will go CRAZY.
New MS6310 Combustible Methane Natural Gas Leaks Detector Digital Propane Tester | eBay

It's well worth the peace of mind. I plan to keep mine with me while traveling, and do an annual inspection with it.

Stu & Filo. T 03-10-2015 10:02 AM

I belive the RVIA says sometrhing like no gas line can be installed in a wall or be inaccessible

taskswap 03-10-2015 03:48 PM

Interesting. Anything linkable? I poked around their site and only saw this:

The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association: Standards

Quote:

Propane line routing and accessibility - all joints in propane lines must be accessible for periodic leak testing and repair. Lines may not be installed in spaces where a nail or screw could pierce the line.
Looks like summary material to me.

In my state (not that state codes matter here, but at least I know them...) the rule is about fittings - gas line run through walls has to be protected with nail stop plates, and you can't have inaccessible fittings. It has to be a continuous run in any cavity. That makes sense to me. Not running it in a wall at all doesn't - going THROUGH the wall is IN the wall, even if only for a few inches. My current camper has black flex line running through the frame and then up into the kitchen and to an outside port. All of that is run through a space that's skinned on both sides - definitely "wall-like".

Talking about what you want and don't want - you DON'T want a gas leak. If you HAVE one, you don't want to not KNOW about it. You definitely don't want it to "pool" or "collect" where it can't dissipate, and since propane is heavier than air, that means bottom venting.

drifter01 03-10-2015 10:05 PM

Just one man's opinion, but a bus vibrates and flexes much more than a stationary house does, so I prefer to keep the lines outside as much as possible. I am also paranoid about the finish (Grommets) on the holes where the gas lines come in as well because of rub through. +1 on the gas detectors. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Good luck with the rest of your build!

Stu & Filo. T 03-11-2015 05:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by taskswap (Post 102709)
Interesting. Anything linkable? I poked around their site and only saw this:

The Recreation Vehicle Industry Association: Standards



Looks like summary material to me.

In my state (not that state codes matter here, but at least I know them...) the rule is about fittings - gas line run through walls has to be protected with nail stop plates, and you can't have inaccessible fittings. It has to be a continuous run in any cavity. That makes sense to me. Not running it in a wall at all doesn't - going THROUGH the wall is IN the wall, even if only for a few inches. My current camper has black flex line running through the frame and then up into the kitchen and to an outside port. All of that is run through a space that's skinned on both sides - definitely "wall-like".

Talking about what you want and don't want - you DON'T want a gas leak. If you HAVE one, you don't want to not KNOW about it. You definitely don't want it to "pool" or "collect" where it can't dissipate, and since propane is heavier than air, that means bottom venting.

I read it long time ago so I couldn't quote it word for word but feel I was pretty close.

taskswap 03-11-2015 05:25 PM

Maybe it was length-based? One of those few times in life when shorter IS better? :)

lornaschinske 03-11-2015 05:54 PM

I think it's as few of connections as possible. I have a single elbow inside.

roach711 03-11-2015 08:57 PM

Like Taskswap said, houses have gas lines running all through them.

My entire propane system is inside the bus. Two 20lb cylinders in a well sealed and bottom vented plywood box, a rubber low pressure hose going from the cylinders to the kitchen area, a black pipe distribution manifold and more rubber low pressure hoses going to the appliances. All my connections are accessible for testing and all hoses run inside those split plastic wiring conduits that the bus makers are so fond of.

I considered running lines outside the passenger compartment but was going to have to deal with routing past the frame rails and grommeting the holes. Even then, most of my connections would have been inside the bus. Wasn't worth it to me.

I also have a good propane detector mounted down near the floor.

Just use a good quality gas rated pipe dope on the threads and pressure test all connections with soapy water.


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