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-   -   Appliance Power Consumption Log (http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f49/appliance-power-consumption-log-23948.html)

CaseyBrown 08-21-2018 09:30 PM

Appliance Power Consumption Log
 
After doing Kil-A-Watt readings on some of my appliances to ensure my planned system could handle them, it occurred to me that a forum database of people's real world power draw would be extremely useful. If you have some data, please share it.

I'll start with the 4 Items I have tested.

Toaster- Proctor and Gamble T-35
Peak Consumption= 785W
Total Consumption Toasting 2 Slices=.044Kwh

Coffee Maker- Ninja Cafetiere
Idle=.7W
Peak Consumption= 1400W
Total Consumption Brewing 12 Cup Carafe=.142Kwh

Cooktop- Copper Chef Induction Cooktop
Idle=.8W
Peak Consumption=1300W
Total Consumption Cooking-
Chicken Liver & Onions W/Gravy (23 1/2 Min Cook
time)=.344Kwh
Bacon & Eggs=.17Kwh

7.0 Cubic Foot Chest Freezer- Insignia NS-CZ70WH6
(Tested In Store)
Peak Consumption (Locked Rotor)=900W
Running Consumption=80W

I hope somebody trying to figure out how much power they need finds this useful, and I hope others share.

Casey

Ronnie 08-22-2018 06:00 AM

Fridgadaire 4.7 cu ft fridge with freezer
45 watts
320 watts for a 24 hour period, set on medium

Beeb 08-22-2018 08:54 AM

Viewsonic 22" LED monitor - 0.15kwhr (9.25hrs)

Box fan (don't know brand... sorry) - 0.66kwhr (10hrs)

Macbook Pro (2014 15" screen) - 0.14kwhr (2hr charge time)


That's all I've collected so far. Well... that's all I've written down so far. I keep forgetting... :facepalm:

CaseyBrown 08-22-2018 01:35 PM

Thanx guys, who knew a box fan needed more power than cooking breakfast and dinner combined :oops: . That's the kind of stuff you won't read in a data sheet.

o1marc 08-22-2018 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CaseyBrown (Post 287447)
Thanx guys, who knew a box fan needed more power than cooking breakfast and dinner combined :oops: . That's the kind of stuff you won't read in a data sheet.

You're comparing apples to oranges. If you compare the box fan usage over the same period as breakfast, the fan is cheaper. You were comparing the numbers of 24 minutes for breakfast compared to 10hrs of fan use.

PNW_Steve 08-22-2018 03:15 PM

Awesome thread!

Thanks to all who have shared.

CaseyBrown 08-22-2018 04:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by o1marc (Post 287469)
You're comparing apples to oranges. If you compare the box fan usage over the same period as breakfast, the fan is cheaper. You were comparing the numbers of 24 minutes for breakfast compared to 10hrs of fan use.

Missing the point..the idea is to log power used by devices in the real world in the course of an average day.

In this context it is "apples to apples"

Casey

brokedown 08-22-2018 04:50 PM

Presumably this thread is to help people plan their power needs when running from generator and battery sources (including solar). Keep in mind that when using a DC power source any of the appliances that run on AC power will have to be run through an inverter, which requires its own power to be considered as well. For some loads I have seen inverters operating at only 50% efficiency, meaning a 100 watt load was actually consuming 200 watts of stored power. Resistive loads (like toasters and other things with heating elements) are hard to supply power to, and loads where you're converting more than once (laptop charger, anything with a power brick/wall wart) are stacking inefficient conversions on top of each other.

If you're installing a solar or otherwise charged battery bank, you can save a lot of power by running DC appliances instead of AC ones, and powering DC appliances directly from DC power. The conversion between AC and DC power can be very expensive, avoid doing it multiple times!

Some things are easier than others, of course. You can't just plug any old refrigerator into 12v, you would need one designed specifically for 12v. But some things are easy. laptop chargers, phone chargers, lighting, fans, routers...

Remember, every watt you don't consume is a watt you don't have to produce and store! Being efficient pays off big time.

CaseyBrown 08-22-2018 05:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brokedown (Post 287487)
Presumably this thread is to help people plan their power needs when running from generator and battery sources (including solar). Keep in mind that when using a DC power source any of the appliances that run on AC power will have to be run through an inverter, which requires its own power to be considered as well. For some loads I have seen inverters operating at only 50% efficiency, meaning a 100 watt load was actually consuming 200 watts of stored power. Resistive loads (like toasters and other things with heating elements) are hard to supply power to, and loads where you're converting more than once (laptop charger, anything with a power brick/wall wart) are stacking inefficient conversions on top of each other.

If you're installing a solar or otherwise charged battery bank, you can save a lot of power by running DC appliances instead of AC ones, and powering DC appliances directly from DC power. The conversion between AC and DC power can be very expensive, avoid doing it multiple times!

Some things are easier than others, of course. You can't just plug any old refrigerator into 12v, you would need one designed specifically for 12v. But some things are easy. laptop chargers, phone chargers, lighting, fans, routers...

Remember, every watt you don't consume is a watt you don't have to produce and store! Being efficient pays off big time.

All true. This is just some more data points that I haven't seen anywhere else. On the inverter thing, I have found the closer to max on the inverter, the higher the efficiency, for example drawing 50 watts off a 3 kW inverter your getting down to the 50% range. I plan to run constant loads that have to run on inverter (chest freezer fridge conversion) on a dedicated inverter sized for the load.

Casey

brokedown 08-22-2018 05:58 PM

Keep in mind that your freezer will have a start surge that can be 2x or 3x the continuous draw. Mine would consume 150-ish watts running from inverter power but could briefly pull 400w at start-up! Also, a MSW inverter can be much less efficient than a PSW inverter for things with motors, refrigerators and air conditioners are the common examples of things they're bad at.


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