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-   -   Transporting bus cross-country (http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f13/transporting-bus-cross-country-24464.html)

Rhian 10-03-2018 03:19 PM

Transporting bus cross-country
 
Hello everyone!

I am planning to move from Idaho back home to North Florida asap and am looking into my options for transporting my bus that distance.
I have just started the gutting process, so it is not yet livable, and I have my personal vehicle and belongings to transport as well.
At the moment, the bus needs a variety of repairs (bad axel seal, bad front tires, possibly brake replacements, etc) before it could drive cross-country.

Has anyone had any luck shipping their bus via train or flatbed? I'm not sure the cost and rush to repair the bus plus the stress on the vehicle and having to figure out how to tow my car behind would be worth it.

Any advice? I'm super stressed out about all of this.

dan-fox 10-03-2018 03:59 PM

My advice would be to run some numbers. Even if you get the repairs professionally done, it might be comparable to fix up the bus and pack yourself into it for a good long drive vs flatbedding the bus that distance and also renting a box truck.



Or, close enough that the advantages of having tagged and insured the thing tip the scales towards getting it running. Transporting it via truck is gonna be a lot of money just to relocate the same problem to a new locale.

Rhian 10-03-2018 04:16 PM

Any tips/advice for safely making such a long trip in a bus?

magnakansas 10-03-2018 04:35 PM

fix it drive it
 
$2500 to truck my bus from colorado to kansas. 24 foot long bus. probably better to fix your bus, load your stuff on to it, then add hitch to your bus, and tow the car behind it. If the bus breaks you could drive for parts. time is the bummer thing. when do you leave idaho?

william , topeka kansas

Rhian 10-03-2018 04:54 PM

yeah, im gathering that it will be way cheaper to drive. im just super worried about breaking down in BFE or something. I'm not mechanically inclined.

I'm hoping to leave Idaho ASAP.

cadillackid 10-03-2018 05:18 PM

I just recently bought a bus in oregon and since it was 40 years old I inquired to several shippers about flatbedding it to ohio.. (2500 miles).. I got quotes from 7500-10,000 bucks to do it...



I took my chances, I hopped in and drove it home..



1. unless an axle seal is REALLY bad.. they typically dont leak much fluid and can be topped off daily and driven.. I had one leaking on my red bus and drove it quite a bit checking it every day before i fixed it..



2. you are going to need tires anyway... go ahead and get them.. the tires wont fix themselves on a flatbed.


3. have your brakes checked by at least 2 truck shops (to get a fair assesment).. if it needs brakes get em.



4. if you were planning on renting a U-haul to go across the country with your car and belongings then you will have quite ab it of $$ in that.. any chance your belongings fit in the bus and you get a hitch installed on the bus to tow the car?


seems to me for the $$ you'll have in transporting it that



1. you sell it and go buy another in your home state or close to it
2. fix it up and drive it


the reason transporting a full size bus is so pricey is that you will be eseentially hring a full size semi as a full truckload.. no way to share expenses in an LTL situation with the truck carrying a bus..



freight operators dont like to go into florida unless they are agricultural haulers as they have a tough time getting any Backhaul out of florida.. so it may be a good bit of deadhead (no revenue)..



the low bid I got fro ma trucking company was stringent as they could cover that driver once he arrived in ohio with a backhaul.. (they were a west coast freight hauler)..



my bus had yucky tires so I got new ones in oregon... knew id need them either way... changed the oil, and took off..
-Christopher

Rhian 10-03-2018 05:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cadillackid (Post 293135)
I just recently bought a bus in oregon and since it was 40 years old I inquired to several shippers about flatbedding it to ohio.. (2500 miles).. I got quotes from 7500-10,000 bucks to do it...



I took my chances, I hopped in and drove it home..



1. unless an axle seal is REALLY bad.. they typically dont leak much fluid and can be topped off daily and driven.. I had one leaking on my red bus and drove it quite a bit checking it every day before i fixed it..



2. you are going to need tires anyway... go ahead and get them.. the tires wont fix themselves on a flatbed.


3. have your brakes checked by at least 2 truck shops (to get a fair assesment).. if it needs brakes get em.



4. if you were planning on renting a U-haul to go across the country with your car and belongings then you will have quite ab it of $$ in that.. any chance your belongings fit in the bus and you get a hitch installed on the bus to tow the car?


seems to me for the $$ you'll have in transporting it that



1. you sell it and go buy another in your home state or close to it
2. fix it up and drive it


the reason transporting a full size bus is so pricey is that you will be eseentially hring a full size semi as a full truckload.. no way to share expenses in an LTL situation with the truck carrying a bus..



freight operators dont like to go into florida unless they are agricultural haulers as they have a tough time getting any Backhaul out of florida.. so it may be a good bit of deadhead (no revenue)..



the low bid I got fro ma trucking company was stringent as they could cover that driver once he arrived in ohio with a backhaul.. (they were a west coast freight hauler)..



my bus had yucky tires so I got new ones in oregon... knew id need them either way... changed the oil, and took off..
-Christopher



I have gotten bunches of quotes in the time since I initially posted this and definitely seems like it will be a better deal to fix it and drive, as nervous as that makes me. I am, however, not planning to tow my car as that is not something I am comfortable doing having had no practice or experience. I am planning to talk to my bus mechanic and see what the cost will be to get it road trip ready and hope for the best I guess.

magnakansas 10-03-2018 08:39 PM

rhian --what kind of car
 
I have a house in Emmett Idaho, that is not far from Boise. What kind of car do have? How long is your bus? post a picture of side shot of the bus.

These all relate to towing a car behind your bus and I might be to go from boise to kansas with you.

william

Rhian 10-03-2018 09:11 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by magnakansas (Post 293165)
I have a house in Emmett Idaho, that is not far from Boise. What kind of car do have? How long is your bus? post a picture of side shot of the bus.

These all relate to towing a car behind your bus and I might be to go from boise to kansas with you.

william


I drive a Kia Spectra5 (manual hatchback) and my bus is 28ft long bumper to bumper

Alan N 10-03-2018 09:46 PM

Your car will tow easily.
Your bus will hardly know it's back there.
Bolt and or weld a hitch to the bus bumper no need for a receiver hitch.
A factory tow bar for your car should be easy to find. Get the tow bar used and just buy new brackets for the car.
This is easy. Go for it.
Nice looking bus.


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