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Old 01-24-2020, 05:46 PM   #21
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there are people here who have used it successfully.
My floor is either rusted metal where the galvanic coating is long gone (along with all the steel in some places) or else still has paint on it and the metal is untouched underneath. So once you ospho the floor, the rustoleum will either contact ordinary steel (with some iron phosphate dust on it) or the original paint (which rusto seems to adhere fine to). That's probably why so many people use this on the floor and it works for them.

Interestingly, this article says that galvanized steel will lose its zinc layer in about 10 years if kept in wet or soaked environments - which I guess is what my bus floor was for most of its life, thanks to the leaky windows.
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Old 01-24-2020, 06:13 PM   #22
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When it comes to rust restoration, you are the King, musigenesis! (It's Elvis's old plane)
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Old 01-24-2020, 06:19 PM   #23
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Aw man, don't give me any ideas. I'm already thinking of volunteering on New Jersey or Olympia.
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Old 01-24-2020, 08:06 PM   #24
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You'd be a valuable asset.

Seriously though, we so admire your attitude & the incredible amount of work you're putting in to this project. Haven't commented in your build thread, but it's been one of the most inspirational to read.
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Old 01-24-2020, 08:24 PM   #25
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You'd be a valuable asset.

Seriously though, we so admire your attitude & the incredible amount of work you're putting in to this project. Haven't commented in your build thread, but it's been one of the most inspirational to read.
Well gosh, I'm glad you're enjoying it!
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Old 01-26-2020, 10:28 AM   #26
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Sikaflex 221

I took my floor to the metal, ground off the rust, used Corroseal on it, then sealed the holes with Sikaflex 221, an automotive caulk. I've used the Sikaflex all over my bus, and I love it. It goes down easy, stays down, is flexible, and if I have to take it off again, it comes off reasonably well with a putty knife. Caveat: I've never used it over Rustoleum, so no guarantees there, but I wouldn't be concerned.


You can get it on Amazon. It's about $10-15, but a tube goes a long way. My biggest complaint is that you can't buy it in less than a 10 oz tube, so I have to save up all my caulking jobs to do at once so I'm not wasting a partial tube.
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Old 01-26-2020, 11:54 AM   #27
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I just got done having breakfast with a friend who is a 30 year flooring installer. Heís done it all. I posed the question to him. He says glue-down vinyl plank is the way to go. He says that the glue down stuff is less susceptible to thermal expansion. I asked him about sheet material and he said that until itís in place, the good stuff is too brittle for anyone without a lot of experience to install successfully. He says the stuff at Home Depot and the other retail outlets is not durable enough. He also said that the good vinyl plank isnít available at the big box stores. I asked what brand. He doesnít have current info since heís been retired, but says he will ask another career guy whatís currently the good stuff.

I also asked him about installing before or after furniture. He said to do it after since thereís less chance of a loose nail of screw or dropped tool gouging it. He says that the stuff is easy enough to cut and notch to do it after.

When I get brand info I will update with what he has for that. I told him to make sure to tell his guy that it will be installed in a vehicle and subject to extreme temperature variation.
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Old 01-26-2020, 12:38 PM   #28
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I think vinyl planks have to do with brand and quality

I went to an outdoor viewing platform in a park yesterday it was built with vinyl planks probably about 5-7 years ago. They are still solid and in great shape. I also know of another park where vinyl planks are years old and still holding up solid.

I have seen a couple of vinyl porches done on homes that completely went to hell in less then 2 years. The sun deteriorated the vinyl and the planks warped.

Seems like some of it might be the grade and mixture of the vinyl.
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Old 01-27-2020, 07:59 PM   #29
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Silicone is hydroscopic, meaning it attracts and hold moisture. Use uranthene based sealants , or butyl rubber based sealants.
Do you not recommend using silicone anywhere on the bus? Isn't that what's made for sealing water out of windows? When WOULD be the time to use silicone?
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Old 01-27-2020, 08:07 PM   #30
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And I haven't done mine yet, but I think deleting the booster pump only works for front engine buses. On the pusher buses, you may need it to get the coolant all the way to the front for the defrost.
Ours is an engine-in-front shorty.

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3M - 08368 - Urethane Seam Sealer, White, 310mL Cartridge - 60455054639

BaconFarms

The interwebs say not to use this on bare metal. What did you use as a primer for this?
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:08 AM   #31
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The interwebs say not to use this on bare metal. What did you use as a primer for this?
https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/...8361-08364.pdf

Look for the 'TDS' or 'Technical Data Sheet' for anything you don't want to take the interwebz word on ;)
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:47 AM   #32
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https://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/...8361-08364.pdf

Look for the 'TDS' or 'Technical Data Sheet' for anything you don't want to take the interwebz word on ;)
That weld-through property is most interesting. From the description, it seems you spread the stuff on the two surfaces you're mating, clamp them together and then spot-weld them. Presumably resulting in a watertight join.

It also says residual acid from etching primers will weaken the bond of the sealer. I wonder if ospho has the same negative effect.
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Old 01-28-2020, 10:58 AM   #33
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I'd think ospho would absolutely have the aforementioned negative impact if not thoroughly rinsed/neutralized before application.
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