Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-04-2018, 03:53 PM   #1
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: GA
Posts: 481
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Amtran RE
Chassis: International 3000
Engine: T444e 7.3L
How do I design a propane system?

I've been reading a lot of old propane threads, and I am still confused.
I have a 100-lb propane tank and 3x 20-lb propane tanks, all hung underneath my bus. Currently, they aren't connected to anything, but I want to run the following:

1. Honda EU3000IS generator with propane conversion kit
2. Propane Heater
3. On-demand hot water heater
4. Propane stove/oven

Additionally, I want flexibility to add additional propane components (second generator, propane fridge, etc.).

So, how do I do this? Where does the regulator go in the system? Is it right next to the tanks, before the lines split off for the appliances? If so, do I have to worry about not having enough pressure if I run more than one appliance at a time?

My thought was to do two two-stage auto-changeover regulators (one with 2x 20lb tanks, the other with one 20lb and one 100lb), connected by a y-valve. (I can turn off one set of tanks and use the other. Also, if a regulator goes bad, I still have a spare). Is this a bad idea?

Should my disconnect valves be right at the manifold under the bus? At the appliance inside? Should I have a valve on each end of the line?

Thanks!
Propane.JPG
Biscuitsjam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2018, 07:25 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
Jolly Roger bus 223's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Swansboro,NC
Posts: 1,119
Year: 86
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford B700
Engine: 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
Research and look into LP gas mans handbook.
More info than you need but a good resource.
Not really bus related.
But pipe sizing and regulator placement is key.
Regulators do fail but not very often.
If that is your concern then I would build a high pressure manifold with shutoff for each tank and a shutoff and regulator for each piece of equipment.
In my work we usually do one for a manifold to serve several pieces of equipment at a time but if the regulator messes up it will shut the everything down.
With seperate regulators it is isolated to that specific piece of equipment and everything else still work and you have a shutoff to work on that while the rest still work.
Good luck
Jolly Roger bus 223 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2018, 07:32 PM   #3
Bus Crazy
 
Jolly Roger bus 223's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Swansboro,NC
Posts: 1,119
Year: 86
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford B700
Engine: 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
Also each appliance is going to have it own gas pressure min.and max..
Usually posted and read in inches of gas weight measured at the fixture after all piping bends and turns.
Not saying your regulator has to be inside but they do have to be sized properly.
Good luck
Have fun
Jolly Roger bus 223 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2018, 09:20 PM   #4
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: GA
Posts: 481
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Amtran RE
Chassis: International 3000
Engine: T444e 7.3L
Thanks. I just spent some time researching - everything I have requires 11 inches of pressure. I have four or five different regulators right now. The highest quality one that I already own is 1/4" inlet and 3/8" outlet. I think it's around 175,000 BTU/HR. I think that's enough for my needs, but I'm not really sure without more research. I see 400,000 BTU/HR regulators for sale also (same inlet and outlet sizes).

If I just hook all my tanks up to one regulator and open the tank valves, then they will all drain at similar rates. That means that refills become a bit of a hassle since everything has to be topped off. Manually opening and closing valves to different tanks is also a bit of a hassle. Is there an elegant solution? It's not the end of the world if not, but I prefer to spend a few extra minutes during the design phase than have to deal with minor aggravations.
Biscuitsjam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2018, 10:34 PM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
roach711's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Farmington Hills, Mi (Detroit area)
Posts: 1,899
Year: 2000
Coachwork: Eldorado Aerotech 24'
Chassis: Ford E-450 Cutaway Bus
Engine: 7.3L Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 19
Your design shows two auto changeover regulators. Those will drain one tank before drawing from the other so you can pull one tank while the other stays connected as backup.
__________________
The Roach Motel
roach711 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×