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Old 06-05-2017, 03:45 PM   #1
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How to frame walls with curved bus walls

Hello! I am on to framing the closet and bathroom walls out... but have hit a ... well wall.

The walls of my bus have a curve to them leaving a large gap when I attempt to frame out the wall.

How can I fix this and make a flash clean look. Has anyone else run into this problem?

Thank you!!!
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Old 06-05-2017, 05:10 PM   #2
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That's why I'm going to use steel framing, you can cut & bend it to follow the radius.
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Old 06-05-2017, 05:26 PM   #3
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Why not just frame it square, but trim your wall covering to fit the curve? If the gap bothers you a custom sized block, or door wedges, could be put in place to brace the framing to the wall.
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Old 06-05-2017, 05:32 PM   #4
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Perhaps you're looking for a "contour gage" or "curve template." They're available in a variety of sizes/lengths.

Or, the poor man's method with a scrap of sheet material, something rigid and cheap like cardboard or Masonite/hardboard. Hold it with an edge against the wall, ie perpendicular to the wall. Find a block that's about the same size as the largest gap between the wall and the template material. Using the block as a spacer, hold a pen against the block against the wall and trace the shape of the wall's curve onto the template material. Cut along the line. Test the fit of the template to the wall. Repeat until you like the fit, then transfer the shape from the template onto the "good" material.
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Old 09-30-2017, 03:20 PM   #5
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Here's a poor man's/ rocket scientists method: trim the card board to fit the curve should be symmetrical to both sides pay no need to whether it is square to the bus justus a long enough piece to extend below window frames top. Then run a chalkline across same point on each side hold template in place and snap the line the suspend line on center point or first vertical point and snap vertical line you now have a template that fits both sides of your roof. Be sure to make alignment mark after making the horizontal line so the bottom will be square and plumb to the roof and hope your body isn't warped lol

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Old 09-30-2017, 04:18 PM   #6
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I used sheet metal studs and track to create mine. Turned sideways and boxed together you get a 1-1/2" wall framing with something to attach to and it works well with 1-1/2" track that can be cut on the edges to fit any curve
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Old 09-30-2017, 04:26 PM   #7
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Sorry, you can make a full wall template out of cardboard. I had several cardboard templates but they were all created out of my first full height and width template that fit perfect to the curved out wall below the window and the curved in wall at the window and then the bus wire way and then the curved roof. Hope my pics went through on the last post?
You can also use ca dboard boxes to represent furniture and stuff in your build to see if your comfortable with the lay out.
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Old 09-30-2017, 06:16 PM   #8
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Home Depot has a clearance bin of warped lumber. Find some 2x4's with the right bow in it.


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Old 09-30-2017, 08:12 PM   #9
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My Crown also has non-straight side walls. They also have Crown's unique Dry-Wall design, where the inner wall becomes the outer wall about halfway down. This makes it very difficult to panel the side walls and to make the interior divider walls, but I am doing something which nobody else does. The interior divider walls, three on each side, are 1/2" ply covered by the same 1/8" Celtec expanded-PVC board that I use over the side walls and ceiling, and they fit inside 3/4"-wide aluminum channel. 6063 aluminum is soft enough that it can be easily bent to fit against the side walls and the ceiling, and it also covers over the exposed ends of the walls. The channel is screwed to the side walls and floor and riveted to the aluminum ceiling, then the divider wall simply slides into it. Easy! (OK, not really. Nothing's easy converting a Crown!) By doing my divider walls this way I don't need to cut them precisely to fit against the side walls and ceiling - the channel's 1/2" depth covers all the slight inaccuracies. It looks very neat this way with no exposed brackets or screws, and compared to using 2" x 4" studs I've saved a lot of space. Because each cabinet will be bolted only to the floor, every divider wall except for the shower can be easily removed if needed for modification or repair.

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Old 09-30-2017, 10:10 PM   #10
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I figured I'd saw the top off my guitar and use the sides

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Old 10-03-2017, 10:51 PM   #11
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A member here recommended this to me & I bought it, they also offer it in 37in

148456, 107 Inch Curve Template, Contour Gauge
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Old 10-04-2017, 08:44 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu & Filo. T View Post
A member here recommended this to me & I bought it, they also offer it in 37in

148456, 107 Inch Curve Template, Contour Gauge
That's interesting. Makes me wonder what the Redneck/Cheapskate version would be. ?
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:28 AM   #13
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That's interesting. Makes me wonder what the Redneck/Cheapskate version would be. ?
You call??

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Old 10-04-2017, 11:13 AM   #14
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You call??
That's a little more elaborate then I was thinking. I was imagining something in between a 3ft piece of bailing wire and that.
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Old 10-04-2017, 01:31 PM   #15
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That's a little more elaborate then I was thinking. I was imagining something in between a 3ft piece of bailing wire and that.

I used to run a cnc machine at upscale cabinet shop. We'd build Bruce Wayne style libraries done in wood. They'd use one of these to get their measurements then import directly into Cabinet Vision.


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Old 10-04-2017, 01:42 PM   #16
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I used to run a cnc machine at upscale cabinet shop. We'd build Bruce Wayne style libraries done in wood. They'd use one of these to get their measurements then import directly into Cabinet Vision.


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So it was accurate enough to build cabinets from ? 1/32 ?
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:58 PM   #17
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Those scanners are spot on 1/32 if that. The granite guys used to use one of those. Tops came and fit perfectly. Even scribed to a wavy, uneven wall. Slide right into place.
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Old 09-17-2020, 07:29 AM   #18
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Question keeping the pieces straight

So, my issue isn't how to frame the curve, I've seen it done where several small pieces are attached along the curve, and then the wall itself is cut using a template or contour gauge to fit the curve.,

My question is this: how can I ensure that the pieces that I'm attaching to the bus are in a straight line? I don't necessarily have a reference point to measure against, nor will a square or t-square work, since we have a , you know, curved surface.

suggestions?
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Old 09-17-2020, 06:59 PM   #19
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You could use your t square on the floor. That should be perpendicular to your frame.
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Old 09-17-2020, 11:28 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beachvbguy View Post
So, my issue isn't how to frame the curve, I've seen it done where several small pieces are attached along the curve, and then the wall itself is cut using a template or contour gauge to fit the curve.,

My question is this: how can I ensure that the pieces that I'm attaching to the bus are in a straight line? I don't necessarily have a reference point to measure against, nor will a square or t-square work, since we have a , you know, curved surface.

suggestions?
Do not use a level, unless your bus is level.
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