RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-26-2020, 03:14 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Harrisburg, PA
Posts: 3
Year: 1999
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DT466
Is Flex Seal a good product to use to seal floor

I have been looking into the best way to both fill and seal the holes left behind from the school bus seats as well as the best method to sealing the steal floor. I am currently removing all surface rust on the floor of my bus using an angle grinder.

After all the rust is removed and I have cleaned the floor throughly with water, I will clean the floor with a TSP cleaner. After, I intend to use "Concrete and Metal Prep" to convert any left over rust and etch the metal so that the seal that is used next sticks well to the steal.

Now for what I am unsure about. I have read many different threads on various ways to seal holes and the overall floor. While I was recently working on my bus someone stopped by who is also in the process of converting a bus and recommended using flex seal tape to seal the holes and then using flex seal paint to seal the entire floor. Prior to being recommended Flex Seal, I intended to use a rustoleum paint and primer to seal the floor. I was planning on using steal squares and J-B Weld to seal the holes.

I have been unable to find many forums of others who have gone the Flex Seal approach so I am wondering if anyone has an opinion on whether or not this will work well and last for a very long time?
jholbert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2020, 03:47 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 1,624
Year: 2007
Coachwork: Thomas Built
Chassis: Minotour
Engine: Chevy Express 3500 6.6l
I used a couple cans that were laying around to coat the steel sheet I used to protect my grey tank. I only used it because it was there and free. Something about the As Seen on TV, late night commercial aspect keeps me from taking it seriously.
Danjo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2020, 03:48 PM   #3
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 1,624
Year: 2007
Coachwork: Thomas Built
Chassis: Minotour
Engine: Chevy Express 3500 6.6l
For the bolt holes use pennies and urethane sealant
Danjo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2020, 03:57 PM   #4
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Harrisburg, PA
Posts: 3
Year: 1999
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DT466
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danjo View Post
For the bolt holes use pennies and urethane sealant
How long can you expect the penny and urethane sealant to last? I originally was planning on this approach until I saw a lot of criticism with using pennies due to the potential reactions caused by differing metals touching.
jholbert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2020, 05:02 PM   #5
Bus Geek
 
musigenesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 4,184
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466e
Rated Cap: 65C-43A
Quote:
Originally Posted by jholbert View Post
How long can you expect the penny and urethane sealant to last? I originally was planning on this approach until I saw a lot of criticism with using pennies due to the potential reactions caused by differing metals touching.
Corrosion requires water and oxygen, so if everything is sealed from the elements (via glue and paint), nothing you use will cause any problems.
__________________
Rusty 87 build thread
musigenesis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2020, 05:56 PM   #6
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 1,624
Year: 2007
Coachwork: Thomas Built
Chassis: Minotour
Engine: Chevy Express 3500 6.6l
Quote:
Originally Posted by jholbert View Post
How long can you expect the penny and urethane sealant to last? I originally was planning on this approach until I saw a lot of criticism with using pennies due to the potential reactions caused by differing metals touching.
My bus is an aluminum skin attached to steel structure With steel screws. It’s 14 years old and shows no sign of electrolysis.

For the metal sealant, consider paint that’s designed for coating metal. I see a lot of people using rustoleum in a can. Sherwin Williams also makes “implement paint” that’s similar. There’s also metal boat paint.
Danjo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2020, 09:07 PM   #7
Mini-Skoolie
 
Flipmode's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Palm Beach, FL
Posts: 11
Year: 2003
Coachwork: AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 48 passenger
I used roofing tin tags on my holes as Id go broke on all the holes I had in my floor if I used pennies. They're thinner than pennies and galv steel to match the bus floor. I just caulked them down with seam sealer(dynatron). Yeah I dont trust flex seal either. My vote is for rustoleum on the floor. I used the opportunity to mix up custom colors in rustoleum to experiment for my outside paint job.
Flipmode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2020, 12:47 AM   #8
Mini-Skoolie
 
Shamoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: S.E Missouri
Posts: 67
Year: 2000
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: All American
Engine: Cummins 5.9L 24 valve
Rated Cap: 78
I like the idea of using pennies and urethane sealant but I also like the idea of using galvanized roofing tags (I think I know what your talking of here). I have not gotten this far yet but would like to know what kind of Rustoleum paint have people used for the floor? There are lots of choices in the stores and I cannot decide how to do mine.

As of yet I have no idea how rusty my floor is under the rubber and plywood but I am mentally preparing for the worst and want to have a plan of action before I reveal the extent of rust I will be dealing with. I have been thinking a bit of sanding if the rust is light to moderate with no rust holes and then sealing the bolt holes with the pennies and urethane. After that cures a coat of rust converter and then some rustoleum paint of some kind. What do you all think?
Shamoke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2020, 11:06 AM   #9
Mini-Skoolie
 
Flipmode's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Palm Beach, FL
Posts: 11
Year: 2003
Coachwork: AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 48 passenger
I cleaned the rusty floor(also welded in new pieces) and paint before patching holes with caulking/plates. My thoughts being I wanted to minimize untreated rust and caulking to rusty metal will fail in short order. As far as Rustoleum goes, I've just been buying the gallon or quart cans of enamel that the big box stores sell locally here. Just their basic enamel product line.

When I ripped my floor out it was a bit overwhelming at first with all the rust. My biggest recommendation is get some heavy duty (twisted)wire wheels for a grinder. Both the flat and cupped ones. I found that welding supply stores had better quality wheels than the box stores. Just getting the floor down to clean metal did a lot for assessing my game plan on repairing the floor.
Flipmode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2020, 11:12 AM   #10
Bus Nut
 
BeNimble's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 480
Year: 1999
I don't see any need to seal these holes, you are covering them with plywood right?
BeNimble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2020, 11:32 AM   #11
Mini-Skoolie
 
Shamoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: S.E Missouri
Posts: 67
Year: 2000
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: All American
Engine: Cummins 5.9L 24 valve
Rated Cap: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeNimble View Post
I don't see any need to seal these holes, you are covering them with plywood right?
My plan is for a raised roof of 18 or 20 inches and a raised floor of 10 inches with insulation panels against the metal floor and room to install plumbing and electrical in the space it gives. This will allow building on top of the wheel wells and give ample room to install the plumbing in any location while keeping it all within the insulation envelope.

With all of that said the holes from the seat bolts will need to be sealed to keep everything dry in that "crawl" space, hence my brainstorming the best way to permanently seal them from the elements.
Shamoke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2020, 11:40 AM   #12
Mini-Skoolie
 
Shamoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: S.E Missouri
Posts: 67
Year: 2000
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: All American
Engine: Cummins 5.9L 24 valve
Rated Cap: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flipmode View Post
I cleaned the rusty floor(also welded in new pieces) and paint before patching holes with caulking/plates. My thoughts being I wanted to minimize untreated rust and caulking to rusty metal will fail in short order. As far as Rustoleum goes, I've just been buying the gallon or quart cans of enamel that the big box stores sell locally here. Just their basic enamel product line.

When I ripped my floor out it was a bit overwhelming at first with all the rust. My biggest recommendation is get some heavy duty (twisted)wire wheels for a grinder. Both the flat and cupped ones. I found that welding supply stores had better quality wheels than the box stores. Just getting the floor down to clean metal did a lot for assessing my game plan on repairing the floor.
Ok, so the basic Rustoleum enamel should suffice, nice to know. Do you think the wire brushing is critical or would just using an rust converter be enough to treat surface rust before the enamel paint?
In past experiences with trying to wire wheel surface rust on steel it always seemed to harden the rust into something hard and lumpy without actually removing it. Not sure if I may have been doing something wrong though as I have seen videos when people are successful in removing the rust down to clean metal.
Shamoke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2020, 03:01 PM   #13
Mini-Skoolie
 
Flipmode's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Palm Beach, FL
Posts: 11
Year: 2003
Coachwork: AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 48 passenger
Like you, I've had bad experiences dealing with rust. The wire wheels with too small gauge of wire seem to burnish the rust and not remove it. You want as heavey gauge of wire that you can find as well as the wire being twisted in groups(maybe the term is knotted?) Which will do a decent job of removing the rust. I don't trust rust converters to work on anything heavier than surface rust.
Flipmode is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2020, 05:21 PM   #14
Mini-Skoolie
 
Shamoke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: S.E Missouri
Posts: 67
Year: 2000
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: All American
Engine: Cummins 5.9L 24 valve
Rated Cap: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flipmode View Post
Like you, I've had bad experiences dealing with rust. The wire wheels with too small gauge of wire seem to burnish the rust and not remove it. You want as heavey gauge of wire that you can find as well as the wire being twisted in groups(maybe the term is knotted?) Which will do a decent job of removing the rust. I don't trust rust converters to work on anything heavier than surface rust.
Ahh that's what I've been doing wrong, thank you for enlightening me. Soon as I get my flooring up I'm going to tackle whatever rust there is with one of those knotted wire brushes for the angle grinder.
Shamoke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2020, 07:27 PM   #15
Bus Geek
 
musigenesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 4,184
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466e
Rated Cap: 65C-43A
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shamoke View Post
Ahh that's what I've been doing wrong, thank you for enlightening me. Soon as I get my flooring up I'm going to tackle whatever rust there is with one of those knotted wire brushes for the angle grinder.
Get some Ospho and let the chemicals do the work of removing your rust.
__________________
Rusty 87 build thread
musigenesis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2020, 04:28 PM   #16
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 36
On a similar vein, I'm curious if anyone here's used Marine paint to seal their floors or ceilings. I used it once in a basement and found it to be pretty effective, thick, and resilient against water (if pricey $$$). I've considered using it in a bus, but don't know if that's a good idea or not. I mean, it works for boats, right?
indigo_k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2020, 05:06 PM   #17
Mini-Skoolie
 
NovaTRON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Paradise Bay, Port Ludlow, WA
Posts: 45
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Oshkosh
Engine: Cummins 5.9 12-valve Tranny MT643
Rated Cap: 26
Rustoleum enamel. I've been really impressed with it. After some months of walking on it on the steps, haven't seen a single scratch or chip in the paint. It's a very durable cheap paint.

For holes, I put left over 3/16" ss closed-end pop rivets in the nail holes (adding a little seam sealer)and then jb weld epoxy to coins on the bolt holes. I've even accidently hit one with a sledge hammer while installing my sub floor and it held up. It actually indented the penny but held to the floor.
As long as you fully incase the coins with epoxy or other sealant there should be no issue with electrolysis.
NovaTRON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2020, 05:36 PM   #18
Mini-Skoolie
 
BriteLeaf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Atlanta, TX
Posts: 22
Year: 1990
Coachwork: International
Chassis: Carpenter
Engine: Cummins 5.9
Rated Cap: 78
Is Flex Seal good for sealing the floor? Hmmm ��
Well it sealed my roof great. No leaks in the three years that the 16 x 1/4” holes have been in my roof so I’m betting it’ll seal your floor just fine ��������
__________________
Never argue with a dragon, 🐉 for thou art crunchy and go well with ketchup. 😋😜🤓😎
BriteLeaf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2020, 08:59 PM   #19
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 7
I had great luck with a semi flexible sanding disc. Also a thick twisted wire on the angle grinder.

Both worked well until the wire started wearing out (ie shedding / shredding wires all over).

The floppy sanding discs like 80 or 60 grit take off a lot of rust quick.
TravisJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2020, 08:38 PM   #20
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Telluride, CO
Posts: 10
Aluminium squares and 3M 5200 is what I used. That 5200 is the best sealer I've come across. Some of the squares have come up since but the 5200 hasn't moved. Traditionally it is used as a marine sealant, for both above and below the waterline.
Welshie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
floor, rustoleum paint, seal floor, seal floor holes

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×