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Old 10-24-2018, 10:36 AM   #1
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Japan Drier

I am about to paint my bus with oil-based gloss white. I waited for weeks for the mid-summer temps (95 highs) to pass, but they yielded strait to late fall temps (65 highs and less later this week).

They had this Japan Drier stuff at the store, and it says it speeds up dry time, especially in cooler weather. Great!

But what will it do to the paint in the long run? Will it start cracking and peeling 5 years earlier? 10 years earlier?

Other concerns?
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Old 10-24-2018, 10:53 AM   #2
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Japan drier, when used in the recommended percentage, should do nothing to the strength or integrity of the paint. 1-2 oz per gallon... Mix all your paint before measuring out 1 gal at a time and repeat the same addition to each gallon, boxing it in with at least a quart of the previous gallon for color consistency.
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I am about to paint my bus with oil-based gloss white. I waited for weeks for the mid-summer temps (95 highs) to pass, but they yielded strait to late fall temps (65 highs and less later this week).

They had this Japan Drier stuff at the store, and it says it speeds up dry time, especially in cooler weather. Great!

But what will it do to the paint in the long run? Will it start cracking and peeling 5 years earlier? 10 years earlier?

Other concerns?
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Old 10-24-2018, 10:55 AM   #3
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And as an aside... A good industrial enamel (Sherwin Williams industrial enamel HS) uses xylene as reducer and will dry at 50 degrees and rising and makes a very nice finish when reduced by 10%. It sprays well, rolls well and brushes so so.
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Old 10-24-2018, 11:02 AM   #4
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Japan drier, when used in the recommended percentage, should do nothing to the strength or integrity of the paint. 1-2 oz per gallon... Mix all your paint before measuring out 1 gal at a time and repeat the same addition to each gallon, boxing it in with at least a quart of the previous gallon for color consistency.
"should" is the operative word here. Do you say that from experience? Personal or professional experience?
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Old 10-24-2018, 11:07 AM   #5
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I got Rust-O-Leum Professional High Performance Protective Enamel for industrial applications. It says thin only with acetone, not gasoline, turpentine, lacquer thinner, etc.
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Old 10-24-2018, 11:10 AM   #6
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Last time I painted my fenders for my truck with oil-based enamel, it took weeks to get 3 coats on, each dried, sanded, and recoated.

I was in Hawai`i, and although it was never below 70, it was humid. It can be humid here in GA, so I'm worried my bus will be sticky for a month...
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Old 10-24-2018, 11:18 AM   #7
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Professional experience. Union industrial painter for 20 years. Have used Japan drier many times. For the amount you will save by using alkyd based paint, I would look at a higher grade enamel. Name brand. MAV, Sherwin Williams, ICI, etc... Rust-Oleum is medium quality at best. Tractor supply implement paint is garbage.
Standard alkyd based (oil) paints chalk quickly.
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"should" is the operative word here. Do you say that from experience? Personal or professional experience?
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Old 10-24-2018, 11:22 AM   #8
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High humidity will slow drying time some. Keep it out of direct sunlight if possible, if you are taking a break, stop at a seam or panel so you don't have a flash where you pick back up, quick sanding and wipe with lacquer thinner, xylene, or even mineral spirits will make for a good bond.
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Last time I painted my fenders for my truck with oil-based enamel, it took weeks to get 3 coats on, each dried, sanded, and recoated.

I was in Hawai`i, and although it was never below 70, it was humid. It can be humid here in GA, so I'm worried my bus will be sticky for a month...
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Old 10-24-2018, 11:28 AM   #9
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Professional experience. Union industrial painter for 20 years. Have used Japan drier many times. For the amount you will save by using alkyd based paint, I would look at a higher grade enamel. Name brand. MAV, Sherwin Williams, ICI, etc... Rust-Oleum is medium quality at best. Tractor supply implement paint is garbage.
Standard alkyd based (oil) paints chalk quickly.
Thanks for sharing your expertise!

The chalkiness of the original paint is an issue now. It gets on my clothes when I am up on the roof now. the white paint up there leaves streaks when it rains. 20 years of Tucson sun I guess.

I have a magic Home Depot card, so I got what they had, but I hate painting, and hate rust even more, so you may have me convinced to return this stuff and go elsewhere....
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Old 10-24-2018, 11:59 AM   #10
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Before you paint at the very least you have to get that chalk off or the new paint will never stick
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Old 10-24-2018, 12:06 PM   #11
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Before you paint at the very least you have to get that chalk off or the new paint will never stick
Thanks for the hints. Should I strip it completely; or sand it, wash it, then rinse with solvent? Only the white paint on top is chalky and rubs off.
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Old 10-24-2018, 12:09 PM   #12
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Unless the original paint is failing there's no need to strip it completely... A light scuff with some sandpaper or a Scotch-Brite pad just to give it some tooth to bind and a white with some sort of solvent is all you should need.
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Old 10-24-2018, 12:30 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Njsurf73 View Post
Unless the original paint is failing there's no need to strip it completely... A light scuff with some sandpaper or a Scotch-Brite pad just to give it some tooth to bind and a white with some sort of solvent is all you should need.
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Old 10-24-2018, 01:07 PM   #14
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High humidity will slow drying time some. Keep it out of direct sunlight if possible, if you are taking a break, stop at a seam or panel so you don't have a flash where you pick back up, quick sanding and wipe with lacquer thinner, xylene, or even mineral spirits will make for a good bond.
Hey Njsurf,

It sounds like you have some solid creds when it comes to metal finishing.

I wonder if we could talk you into lending your experience over on the "Primer" thread?


http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/pr...tml#post295832

We are not having the best of luck selecting the right primer for the application.

I would also love to hear more about your experience with Sherwin Williams Vs. Rustolium?

Thanks.

S.
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