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Old 11-03-2019, 06:06 PM   #1
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Join Date: Apr 2019
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Looking for advice on rust conversion

The TLDR: when do I stop grinding and where do I use a rust converter?

Pic one is an overview of where u was grinding tonight. 2 3 &4 are close-ups.

If you notice the wheel well, there's some acrylic or rubber caulking they used. All that orange is just dust.

I'm getting down to bare metal. Do I still use a rust converter on the bare metal? Around the bolt holes it's cleaning up really well. The rest is cleaning up but it's also kind of pitted.

The worst spot is around that hole I put in the floor. Do I keep grinding there? Do I cut it out? Do I just put a rust converter on it patch it and call it a day?

Then you can see the seams also. The rust grinds up for the most part pretty easy. But if I'm going to put ospho or something down do I even need 2 grind that? I guess I'm grinding the seams no matter what. What about that orange blotch above it in the picture? And then all the light white and orange stuff that's between the bare metal and the rusted spot?

Am I explaining this correctly? I also just realized how dark it is at 6 p.m. so I think I'm only going to get maybe five or six hours each week for a while to do this cleanup. What should I do with the exposed metal I've got already? I've been home half an hour and I can already feel the rust taking over my work already.
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Old 11-03-2019, 06:08 PM   #2
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I forgot to post the pictures.IMG_20191103_173039.jpgIMG_20191103_173056.jpgIMG_20191103_173102.jpgIMG_20191103_173110.jpg
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Old 11-03-2019, 06:24 PM   #3
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I get it to about where you have it then use a converter.
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Old 11-03-2019, 07:15 PM   #4
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Brand new metal will have surface rust if unprotected.
Painters will wipe new metal with Ospho. Then wipe down with an oil like fluid film to prevent new rust. Clean the oil off before painting.

If you can only work a few hours at a time I would work in sections. Do the grind, clean, and ospho treatment in one work session. Then either paint that section (after removing the ospho residue (mineral spirit wipe down) then either (within 30 min!) paint, or coat with fluid film.

Otherwise, like you already mention, your 'fresh, raw' metal will nearly immediately get a new surface coat of rust...

When you do paint, several thin coats will be stronger and more likely to 'seal' the metal than one heavy coat.
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Old 11-03-2019, 07:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
I get it to about where you have it then use a converter.
alright Im on the right path ty
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Old 11-03-2019, 07:48 PM   #6
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Join Date: Apr 2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banman View Post
Brand new metal will have surface rust if unprotected.
Painters will wipe new metal with Ospho. Then wipe down with an oil like fluid film to prevent new rust. Clean the oil off before painting.

If you can only work a few hours at a time I would work in sections. Do the grind, clean, and ospho treatment in one work session. Then either paint that section (after removing the ospho residue (mineral spirit wipe down) then either (within 30 min!) paint, or coat with fluid film.

Otherwise, like you already mention, your 'fresh, raw' metal will nearly immediately get a new surface coat of rust...

When you do paint, several thin coats will be stronger and more likely to 'seal' the metal than one heavy coat.

That's what I was thinking. I worked an hour and a half on this. Wasn't long. Went through drive thru and it was pitch black outside lol. I can work seam to seam in a sitting then work on the next. Thanks for the advice.
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