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Old 10-31-2020, 03:55 AM   #21
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 176
Year: 1981
Coachwork: Coachwork?
Chassis: International
Engine: CAT 3208 Marine Diesel
https://www.ebay.com/itm/293806266435 Looks like by someone in the community, and looks respectable. Could move any time now as it has Buy It Now.

Prefer 35-37' buses as that will fit in my parents driveway. A 37' bus will allow me a 7' back deck. I can almost feel the breeze on my chest as I relax in comfort with a view.
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Old 10-31-2020, 03:30 PM   #22
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,847
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
You may want to find out what transmission it has before getting interested.
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Old 11-01-2020, 01:56 AM   #23
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 176
Year: 1981
Coachwork: Coachwork?
Chassis: International
Engine: CAT 3208 Marine Diesel
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
You may want to find out what transmission it has before getting interested.
Of Course. Celebrated Halloween Yesterday, Contacting Them Today.

Looks like they're trying to hide something, if they're a part of the community they would know how much a trans other than a 545 is a selling point?

Maybe they're hiding the awesome trans so a dedicated bus nut will ask and discover the gem that is the listing.

It's in MS, land of high humidity. Low on my list due to the above factors.
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Old 11-01-2020, 02:46 AM   #24
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 14,680
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DTA360 / MT643
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
Swapping parts on most RE isn’t bad, esp the things that go bad most. The exception to the rule were some amtran RE that had the radiator out the back instead of the side. These had terrible access to work on.

Gear drive compressors on RE or CE are often stuffed down low and harder to get to..

But the things that fail most, water pump, alternator, belts , hoses.. (A/C but I’m guessing you won’t get that being in Alaska).. all easy to access in RE.. in frame rebuilds can even be performed pretty readily .. of course a couple minuses are power steering and heater lines must run length of bus.. power steering often controls the engine fan..

CE style rear heater lines can be eliminated and power steering is only that. Won’t strand you if you blow a line. Being a little guy I do love being able to stand between the tire and the frame to work on my Underbood areas.. (CE)
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Old 11-04-2020, 09:32 PM   #25
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 176
Year: 1981
Coachwork: Coachwork?
Chassis: International
Engine: CAT 3208 Marine Diesel
Question Look what I found on GovDeals!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/264904690289 Still on the market, and haven't heard back on the trans. I'll let you know when / if they respond.

Found this gem: https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?f...4&acctID=16379

CadillacKid, I am considering RE transit buses as well, see a pair on Govdeals https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?f...33&acctid=7851

Both buses report small, subcritical problems one has an air leak. I could buy them, keep the older one, fix the small problem(s) myself and sell the other bus, assuming most things go right.

Do you know if RE transit buses are more complicated to work on? I know it's going to be harder to find someone to work on them, and some specific parts will be pricier and harder to get. Freeway gearing is going to suck therefore would you know if it's just a matter swapping something on the driveline?

I do like the huge, weatherproof windows on transit buses, and their boxy interiors make it easier to build out.

I love skoolies of course, and a pre-2004 36-40' Conventional is still my first choice.
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Old 11-05-2020, 02:57 AM   #26
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,847
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
It will be interesting to see what the final sales price is for those two auctions (the lot of 2 transits & the FS65). With 5 days remaining, they still have LOTS of time to rise in price.
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Old 11-05-2020, 06:20 AM   #27
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 14,680
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DTA360 / MT643
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
I looked at these 2 transits yesterday.. it states the levelling valve is the sourcve of the air leak.. that could be pretty easily replaced iof its the standard valve used on the front of thomas, etc. some of those transits have more elaborate Kneeling systems for the front suspension that can get pricey to replace parts.. (maybe the broken part is included) no idea of these are kneelers or not.. that second one was pulled for some reason in 2013 and never used again. 289K of city use is pretty high for a cummins 5.9.. its not a wet-sleeve engine so when you wear it out, you must pull the engine to have the block machined for overhaul..



personally I dont mind working on RE busses. . the main thing is to make the inside access panel accessible fairly easily.. so if you finish pout the back of the bus with a bed, etc.. make sure you can move it if you need to get into that panel for something in the forward part of the engine compartment..



whether you buy them depends on the features you are looking for.. part of the bus likely has taller ceiling and lower floor which is nice.. A/C will be included if you are looking for road A/C.. no idea on gearing.. most city busses will run 65 but some wont do much more than that if they were designed as in-town route busses..


-Christopher
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Old 11-05-2020, 06:23 AM   #28
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 14,680
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DTA360 / MT643
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
1991 ebay bus is PRICEY. esp for a slow dog.. 7.3 mechanical engine.. reliable I suppose in its day but not one id choose for anything other than a collector bus. some people here report their T444E is slow.. those mechanical IDI are even slower..
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Old 11-05-2020, 06:25 AM   #29
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 14,680
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DTA360 / MT643
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
FS65 lookss really nice.. have to watch it.. price will likely go up quick on him but definitely looks like a neat bus!
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Old 11-09-2020, 04:21 AM   #30
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 176
Year: 1981
Coachwork: Coachwork?
Chassis: International
Engine: CAT 3208 Marine Diesel
Quote:
Originally Posted by Me
I know it's not a skoolie, and I know they're going to be harder to get parts and service on, but I'm really digging these mini-buses. RE looks to consume entire back wall, implying that it's not crammed in.


Several NovaBuses to pick from. Auction ends in 3 days.


https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?f...5&acctid=11774
https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?fa=Main.Item&itemid=91&acctid=11774

https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?f...0&acctid=11774

https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?f...6&acctid=11774

https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?f...0&acctid=11774

https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?fa=Main.Item&itemid=97&acctid=11774

https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?f...8&acctid=11774 (Very High Miles)

https://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?fa=Main.Item&itemid=101&acctid=11774 ("has fluid leak, do not know what kind" when you look at the pictures there's a dark spot under the radiator, could be a pavement stain. Also Odometer is likely rolled over).


Owned by Texas A&M University, want to know their attitude towards maintenance, perhaps somebody reading this thread knows if A&M claps out their buses before retirement?

Then I saw this post:
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
The only thing I see right off is the ZF transmission. Finding service for them can be difficult and expensive. I saw a member here walk away from their bus due to ZF transmission troubles.

At what these are going to close at, buy two and gut one out, and carry the spare ZF transmission under my couch, next to the boxes containing every other unique, rare and expensive small part I can pack around it.
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Old 12-07-2020, 10:45 AM   #31
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 176
Year: 1981
Coachwork: Coachwork?
Chassis: International
Engine: CAT 3208 Marine Diesel
Meet Fastlane

Meet Fastlane. I will preface with that I do not care how much I paid for my bus, I am glad that I have it.

After coming home from a power washing job, I checked the Facebook listings and saw a lot of three buses that needed to be sold ASAP by the Salem YMCA. One is a 35' international. Saw listing Wednesday night within an hour of listing, got title confirmation from seller Thursday afternoon, booked the next flight to Portland that night and flew up the next morning. Became the proud owner of a school bus before 2:00 PM. I've never met a more cordial guy, at first I thought the listing was a scam because of the low price and lack of photos, but checked out his profile which had posts of his wife baby with the earliest post back to 2012. At the price of the trip, If it was a failure it wouldn't wipe me out, this was an intelligent risk that paid off.



The Monday after buying the bus and resting up, I brought it to RPD Services (great people, great service!). Had it inspected first thing, and fixed as much as I could afford. Fastlane has some problems which I'll have the next 8 months to take care of. Namely surface rust because of roof leaks, worn steering kingpin (biggest issue), engine starting to wear out ( international 3208 ), and radiator at the end of its life (drips when hot), among several other minor issues which don't affect the ability to drive from point A to point B.



I would call the bus drivetrain mid-spec because, with raised gearing, it could keep 65+ at less than 2% grade. I'm either going to swap the transmission or the differential for a 2-3 speed.



$9000 sounds like a lot of money, but it simply isn't. I knew that and know that now, that it's virtually all spent down. I would say $2000 was spent on straight discretionary, only after critical steps were completed. Just the diesel to drive the bus home was about $450, and I used Gasbuddy. I knew I would spend more than I expected (30% more). I ended up spending 50% more, as now I need to get a job to finish the registration (the job I need regardless for years now).



On the first leg of the drive home I feared compression loss & severe clutch slippage, If it came to it I could pay a $1000 tow to the nearest RV storage lot, store it, book a motel for 1-2 nights (Amtrak now runs 3 days a week) and take the next train home. It turned out to be mostly mis-shifts and low gearing, I needed to rev at 2500 RPM to keep 55 MPH on I-5. When the semis are passing you, you're too slow. I drove super well as I didn't even have plates on the bus, much less registration. I didn't know where to get temporary insurance so I drove well and rolled the dice.



I prefer to register in my home state of California, where I reside and hold my CDL. I'm rightfully scared of being trapped by CA commercial smog regs if I can't re-title to RV straight away for whatever reason. Calling CARB today. If I can't register in CA I'll register in SD, where I have a PMB with Americas Mailbox. Makes it harder as it's legally an Out of State CMV.


Has anyone re-titled their out-of-state commercially-registed bus straight over to RV in CA within the last 6 months? Is there a window closing to be grandfathered in because of regs going into effect Jan 1st, 2021 (it's December 7th, 2020). I've already read the threads about CA registration here and still looking for a reg expert in CA. Going to hire a licensed VIN vefication service so I don't have to deal with the DMV as much, it's worth 1-2 days at my job alone, just to avoid moving the bus out of it's inch-perfect placement in my moms driveway.


My hardest part is now over (acquisition), my second hardest part is now.
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Old 12-07-2020, 11:23 AM   #32
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,847
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Congratulations!


Now you have vehicle info you can add to your profile.
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Old 12-07-2020, 01:02 PM   #33
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Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 5,009
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466e
Rated Cap: 65C-43A
Nice-looking bus!
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Old 12-07-2020, 02:04 PM   #34
Skoolie
 
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Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Alaska
Posts: 102
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: IH3800
Engine: DT466E
Rated Cap: 77
ROFL at "when semis are passing you, you're too slow". Everything is going to pass a converted bus if you are driving safely. If you get your bus to the point where it does 80 or 85 in the fast lane, you're gonna need over 1000 feet to full stop. And if you choose to swerve a bus at 70 or above you'll likely roll or blow out. Maybe take the "Fastlane" to wealth by taking the Safelane while driving there? Anyway, congrats on becoming a bus owner and I'd checkout that engine, never heard of international 3208 before. Also you said missed shifts, did you get a manual tranny then? Must be geared like mine if you are maxed around 55, I'm geared at 5.83 with a 5 speed spicer. Also before you drive it again, you are supposed to remove, cover or paint black your Red hazard W/Lights to be legal just about anywhere just FYI to keep you outta trouble.
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Old 02-09-2021, 11:11 PM   #35
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 176
Year: 1981
Coachwork: Coachwork?
Chassis: International
Engine: CAT 3208 Marine Diesel
Removed seats by angle grinding bolt heads, using both 4 1/2 inch angle grinder and 3" cut off tool with the guard removed (Don't worry I wore a face shield, thinking of that famous safety poster "...Now she doesn't need them"). Now selling them for whatever I can get. If no potential buyers in a week, I'll give them away to a church, homeless shelter or non-profit as they're in great condition for their age (no tears, cuts, or cracks in the fabric).

My mom stripped the fabric and padding from 4 seats, which I may cut up for steel stock.

I'm amazed that the interior metal ceiling, bulkhead to bulkhead is one continuous sheet of steel. It's so perfect that I almost don't want to cut it up. They must have assembled the roof separately and then lowered it to the body.

Amazed that the heat exchanger hoses are supple after over 40 years, and minimal dust had accumulated on them. I know the hoses could have been inspected / replaced at least once, hence the pristineness of them. But really I think they used a very high quality natural rubber in Fall 1980, that could very well not be available today.

The fins on the rear heat exchanger though are chocked FULL of dirt. I'm going to remove the fan motor and blast the fins with a sprayer, being sure to dry the whole assembly right away.

I'm going to put the rear heat exchanger underneath the first row seat that I am going to keep, which means shortening the hose run. What is the best re-use for 15 foot lengths for 1 1/2" supple rubber radiator hose?
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Old 02-10-2021, 07:54 AM   #36
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Hillsboro Oregon
Posts: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastlane View Post
Removed seats by angle grinding bolt heads, using both 4 1/2 inch angle grinder and 3" cut off tool with the guard removed (Don't worry I wore a face shield, thinking of that famous safety poster "...Now she doesn't need them"). Now selling them for whatever I can get. If no potential buyers in a week, I'll give them away to a church, homeless shelter or non-profit as they're in great condition for their age (no tears, cuts, or cracks in the fabric).

My mom stripped the fabric and padding from 4 seats, which I may cut up for steel stock.

I'm amazed that the interior metal ceiling, bulkhead to bulkhead is one continuous sheet of steel. It's so perfect that I almost don't want to cut it up. They must have assembled the roof separately and then lowered it to the body.

Amazed that the heat exchanger hoses are supple after over 40 years, and minimal dust had accumulated on them. I know the hoses could have been inspected / replaced at least once, hence the pristineness of them. But really I think they used a very high quality natural rubber in Fall 1980, that could very well not be available today.

The fins on the rear heat exchanger though are chocked FULL of dirt. I'm going to remove the fan motor and blast the fins with a sprayer, being sure to dry the whole assembly right away.

I'm going to put the rear heat exchanger underneath the first row seat that I am going to keep, which means shortening the hose run. What is the best re-use for 15 foot lengths for 1 1/2" supple rubber radiator hose?

I would not keep or re-use any coolant hose. It has had ethylene glycol in it for years and there is no way to remove it completely. You can if you wish, keep some for coolant repair, but never ever use it for anything that people or pets can contact. It's just not worth it. Some pets will lick and chew on it as the coolant seems to taste sweet to them. They will suffer a painful renal failure death.



I don't know for sure, but I'd bet they lay that ceiling in from a continuous coil when the roof is inverted. Pretty cool tech. Watching videos on youtube about replacing and repairing box truck roofs, really shows some awesome technology.
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Old 02-10-2021, 09:01 AM   #37
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Location: Ohio
Posts: 27
Year: 2009
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: 5 window micro-bird.
Engine: Chevy 6.0L Gas.
Rated Cap: 30 passenger
That bus looks awesome!! Love the front.
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Old 02-12-2021, 02:24 AM   #38
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 176
Year: 1981
Coachwork: Coachwork?
Chassis: International
Engine: CAT 3208 Marine Diesel
I already knew to only use radiator hoses for non-potable water applications. Most likely I'll use them for greywater. Thanks for posting that for newbies reading this thread.

Also it is very fascinating to me how they assemble these vehicles.

Thinking that the best way to remove the cracking rubber and rotten plywood is to put a trashcan under the bus, and cut a 1 foot square hole where it will be needed later in the build.

Also interested in reusing the sheet metal (ceiling and walls) and selling it for something more than scrap (isn't worth the gas to haul to Sims Metal at today's prices), if there are reuses to a fabricator. I don't want to cut it up into too small segments incase someone wants the longest sections possible. I know the segments need to come out of the bus, but want the largest cuts possible. Is the sheet metal worth anything other than scrap metal or unconventional reuse?

I need best practices for securing appliances, cabinets, furnishings, heavy items to the bus body so they stay in place incase the bus is ever in a tip-over event. I know this will cause some more thermal bridging but really now, were talking the cross section of three dozen postage stamps if using high grade steel and welding to frame columns.

I think concerns about thermal bridging are overblown in many cases. I'm going for 2" high density professionally sprayed 2-part foam insulation throughout the walls and ceiling, and adding adhesive insulation on the roof and sides, with durable paint followed by ceramic clear coat. Because I only have an inch over my head (I lucked out with the crown being less curved), I'm thinking of extending the insulated envelope to just above the skirting, enclosing the driveshaft to just ahead of the differential. I'll have any exposed metal spray foamed and coated. Behind the diff, same steel frame & insulation enclosure.

Since I don't want house systems to get damaged if I run over fallen cargo on the interstate (as well as everything getting damaged by shale rock as I drive the Dalton in 3-4 years), I am planning a steel belly cage to be the platform for the massive tankage I plan to have, as well as protect it and the bus incase it ever sinks into a Range Road in Alberta. The steel cage will be thick gauge 2" square tubular steel fully secured and reinforced to the frame, and will be built in sections (as means allow). I'll use sheet steel to properly support tanks, house systems and more while protecting it against the road. 2" foam insulation will be permanently glued inside the rectangles of 2" tubular steel, and 1" foam fully adhered below to the steel and 2" foam (the 1" foam I consider a wear layer as the only thing I hate about vehicles is a lot of things start to look / function like **** because of wear & tear, with no easy way to restore it).

Living in my parents 1963-built house for 27 years and having cold feet in the winter due to no insulation under the hardwood floor, has me really motivated to do this. The comfort benefits alone is worth the hours at work and fabrication time. Having room temperature water come out of the tap all year is nice. Being able to evenly heat your floors is nice. Never worrying about your house systems failing because of outdoor thermal cycling is nice. Not handling hot or cold stuff when you access stuff in the storage bays is nice. Never having to worry about your hanging rods or bolts failing is nice. Not having dirt, corrosives and road grime building up on your cross members and undercarriage is nice. Never having to worry about piping or deep cycle batteries freezing is nice (as long as you maintain the heat). Having complete enclosure of all your house systems is nice.

For access I'll modify the skirting so I could easily remove sections with an impact driver and a minute or two. I'm a burner and plan on carrying my hand and power tool collection to help contribute at Burning Man events, including regionals and Black Rock City. By not having keyed locks or handles, potential thieves will look elsewhere, as even if they see under the bus and see enclosed space they'll have to figure out how to get in. This will be great when I finally venture into Mexico in 3-5 years with Fastlane, once I can insure it against a total-loss scenario in Mexico.

Going to need to do the spartan build to get my SD RV title (already have a PMB # with Americas Mailbox). Already bought 90deg mounting brackets so the things I've been saving can be "permanently" installed for the RV certification.
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Old 02-12-2021, 12:56 PM   #39
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 176
Year: 1981
Coachwork: Coachwork?
Chassis: International
Engine: CAT 3208 Marine Diesel
Lightbulb

Attached is version 1 of a series of diagrams illustrating my implementation of a square steel belly support structure from my last post.
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Old 02-12-2021, 02:38 PM   #40
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Hillsboro Oregon
Posts: 240
Quote:
For access I'll modify the skirting so I could easily remove sections with an impact driver and a minute or two.
This is the method I will be using for my class 8 peterbilt skirting. Each panel has a pair of hooks on the bottom that set the panel into a 1/2" pin, then push the panel up to the frame and use a couple security torx bolts to hold the panel into place. I carry cordless impacts with me.
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