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Old 10-09-2017, 11:00 AM   #1
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Epoxy Wood Ceiling etc

For my 91 Crown I have decide to gut most of it. The ceiling walls and probably the floor. I want to live full time in it and it will be in desert heat and Colorado winters, so tin can thing won't cut it. I need insulation and wood.
My concern atm is epoxy types. I have been looking at boat builders for ideas here. West system 105/207 epoxy for cabinets, ceiling furring and shower walls. Floor I'm considering same epoxy on some wood that I have not chosen. My main concern is joining and vibration.
West systems has something called g flex but at $55 shipped per 32ozs that might be overkill. I want to join wood that can handle condensation and vibration. Anyone that has wisdom or ideas to share is welcome .

Part of my overall plan is to keep it light and moisture resistant... using epoxy and wood.

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Old 10-09-2017, 11:39 AM   #2
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As a carpenter I would think epoxy on an entire interior is a bit of overkill regular varnish would be fine epoxy is used more on boat hulls which are actually in the water constantly.
I've made picnic tables that lasted for years outdoors through winters and all sorts of abuse made out of pine and covered with spar varnish which is a boatbuilders varnish but even that I think is overkill for an interior. The only source of water should be condensation from the metal and an air gap would take care of that.
Alternatively you could just use a stain and let the wood evaporate whatever moisture it takes on.


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Old 10-09-2017, 12:13 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by yello View Post

Part of my overall plan is to keep it light and moisture resistant... using epoxy and wood.
Def overkill, in my opinion. I'd go to big box and get Titebond II for $18/gallon. I make cutting boards out of this stuff.

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Great for handling outdoor woodworking projects, the Titebond II 128 fl. oz. Premium Wood Glue offers ANSI-Type II water-resistance and is FDA approved for indirect food contact, and is also ideal for radio frequency gluing systems. The glue is ideal for fixing outdoor furniture, mailboxes, birdhouses, planters and more with its strong initial tack, fast set time and superior strength.

Weatherproof one-part wood glue ideal for exterior projects
Easy clean up with water
Sets in 60 minutes and cures in 24 hrs
Great for use with outdoor furniture, mailboxes, bird houses and more
Meets ANSI Type-II water-resistance standards
FDA approved for indirect food contact
Conforms to ASTM D-4236
Ideal for radio frequency (R-F) and hot press gluing systems
Unaffected by finishes
Excellent sandability
UV-resistant wood glue
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Old 10-09-2017, 01:20 PM   #4
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Def overkill, in my opinion. I'd go to big box and get Titebond II for $18/gallon. I make cutting boards out of this stuff.

Attachment 16355


Great for handling outdoor woodworking projects, the Titebond II 128 fl. oz. Premium Wood Glue offers ANSI-Type II water-resistance and is FDA approved for indirect food contact, and is also ideal for radio frequency gluing systems. The glue is ideal for fixing outdoor furniture, mailboxes, birdhouses, planters and more with its strong initial tack, fast set time and superior strength.

Weatherproof one-part wood glue ideal for exterior projects
Easy clean up with water
Sets in 60 minutes and cures in 24 hrs
Great for use with outdoor furniture, mailboxes, bird houses and more
Meets ANSI Type-II water-resistance standards
FDA approved for indirect food contact
Conforms to ASTM D-4236
Ideal for radio frequency (R-F) and hot press gluing systems
Unaffected by finishes
Excellent sandability
UV-resistant wood glue
I use tite-bond, but had no idea it was that versatile. You should get a commission from them. Awesome info

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Old 10-09-2017, 02:11 PM   #5
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I use tite-bond, but had no idea it was that versatile. You should get a commission from them. Awesome info

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There are actually 2 formulas- Original in blue isn't waterproof, so it cleans-up easier for regular cabinetry.
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Old 10-09-2017, 02:25 PM   #6
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Remember that moisture can and will collect on both sides of the wood simply due to condensation. Personally, I'd opt for a more "breathable" finish on a ceiling. As Hex noted, that way minor moisture can evaporate. If you have or get a roof leak...well, that's a whole 'nuther matter.
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Old 10-09-2017, 03:24 PM   #7
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I've used Titebond II for years.

It is stronger than the wood you are joining. Properly cured, the wood will break before the joint fails.

It is also water-soluble before it cures, so even the waterproof stuff can be cleaned up with a damp cloth after a joint is clamped.

However, generally you would simply let it "bead" up from the joint and leave it to harden, then remove the excess with a chisel or sandpaper. Trying to wipe it off can lead to the adjacent wood becoming reluctant to take a stain.
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Old 10-09-2017, 03:36 PM   #8
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However, generally you would simply let it "bead" up from the joint and leave it to harden, then remove the excess with a chisel or sandpaper. Trying to wipe it off can lead to the adjacent wood becoming reluctant to take a stain.
One step further is use the blue tape to protect the adjacent wood if new to gluing wood, or like Twigg says- you get splotchy joints, and nobody like splotchy joints.


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Old 10-09-2017, 04:45 PM   #9
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To avoid splotchy joints just wet the entire peice of wood then the stain will be uniform. Or sand the area you got wet problem solved.
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Old 10-09-2017, 04:48 PM   #10
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If you use wood like hard maple, white oak, cedar, teak and other weather resistant wood. Then a simple coat of mineral oil will protect it. To take that up a notch, melt beeswax and mix with mineral oil wipe on. Waterproof finish. Example butcherblock countertops are done this way.
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Old 10-09-2017, 05:11 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatestrr View Post
If you use wood like hard maple, white oak, cedar, teak and other weather resistant wood. Then a simple coat of mineral oil will protect it. To take that up a notch, melt beeswax and mix with mineral oil wipe on. Waterproof finish. Example butcherblock countertops are done this way.
I can see your point about overkill. I'm glad that I was wrong since my idea was probably more difficult and more expensive. I was thinking of something lighter for ceiling and now maybe a hard wood floor. Going to seal that roof tight first. It's not awful but I don't want all the work undone by a roof oversight. Ty!

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Old 10-09-2017, 05:38 PM   #12
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Actually, there's 3. III is waterproof, II is water resistant.
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Old 10-09-2017, 06:23 PM   #13
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Not trying to hi jack but.

What you guys do about the 1/4 round on the sides here.
I would like to leave it as natural as possible.
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