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Old 03-23-2020, 06:34 PM   #1
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Moving into the bus

Well I'm tired of looking at my bus build and not getting it where i want it to be. So I've decided to move out of my rental house into the bus in is current stage of empty and bare with just the subfloor and insulation underneath it. This is a drastic step but I want big results this will free up the majority of my finances and get this project of freeing my life from debt and stress to start with just a jolt of major stress.. wish me luck.
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Old 03-23-2020, 06:38 PM   #2
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Well I'm tired of looking at my bus build and not getting it where i want it to be. So I've decided to move out of my rental house into the bus in is current stage of empty and bare with just the subfloor and insulation underneath it. This is a drastic step but I want big results this will free up the majority of my finances and get this project of freeing my life from debt and stress to start with just a jolt of major stress.. wish me luck.

Good luck! Should be able to free up a good chunk of change that way. You'll also learn to prioritize your needs, I imagine. Got a place to park it and live in it?
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Old 03-23-2020, 07:07 PM   #3
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Well I'm tired of looking at my bus build and not getting it where i want it to be. So I've decided to move out of my rental house into the bus in is current stage of empty and bare with just the subfloor and insulation underneath it. This is a drastic step but I want big results this will free up the majority of my finances and get this project of freeing my life from debt and stress to start with just a jolt of major stress.. wish me luck.
Good on you, I would do this myself if I had a spot where I could live in my bus.
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Old 03-23-2020, 07:44 PM   #4
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Hmm, don't believe I'd recommend that. How about buying a beat up but functional travel trailer for living in while you build out your bus. The trailer will cost a little up front but you'll easily recoup your $ by selling it when your done. Having a "home base" will allow you to do a better job on the conversion rather than a slap crap job you'll soon learn to hate.
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Old 03-23-2020, 08:31 PM   #5
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Good luck! I think like that but it's such a crowded mess right now while I'm building. I couldn't handle living in it. But I'm in a storage yard, so there's little work space and no storage outside the bus. If I had a living spot and a carport or garage I could do it maybe.
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Old 03-23-2020, 10:24 PM   #6
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Good luck! I think like that but it's such a crowded mess right now while I'm building. I couldn't handle living in it. But I'm in a storage yard, so there's little work space and no storage outside the bus. If I had a living spot and a carport or garage I could do it maybe.
I’ve tried to work everyday since New Years Day to put in at least 3 to 4 hours a day to finish what I started a couple of years ago. Sometimes I get in 6 to 8 hours. I’ve made a tremendous amount of progress, but the idea of living in that metal box and working in it would be way too frustrating for me. Good luck for those that can do it.
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:25 AM   #7
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Hmm, don't believe I'd recommend that. How about buying a beat up but functional travel trailer for living in while you build out your bus. The trailer will cost a little up front but you'll easily recoup your $ by selling it when your done. Having a "home base" will allow you to do a better job on the conversion rather than a slap crap job you'll soon learn to hate.
Jack
I am with Jack on this. I do wish you luck.
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:35 AM   #8
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It will be tough going. If you are determined, you can do it. Bear in mind that it will take a lot of time to do it this way due to having to move things around constantly.



Suggestion: Figure out a way to partition the inside of the bus. Like the blue tarps or shower curtains. This way you can keep the part you are currently working on separate from your living quarters. Move the partition to another area for the next part.
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Old 03-24-2020, 06:32 AM   #9
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It will be tough going. If you are determined, you can do it. Bear in mind that it will take a lot of time to do it this way due to having to move things around constantly.



Suggestion: Figure out a way to partition the inside of the bus. Like the blue tarps or shower curtains. This way you can keep the part you are currently working on separate from your living quarters. Move the partition to another area for the next part.
I believe Native has a great idea. I built my wife an entire kitchen back in 2005. Kids had already moved out, so it was just my wife & I. I could not demo the entire kitchen all at once. She had to function in it. I would rip out a couple of cabinets, get all my measurements, then build her replacements and install them. Constantly rearranging things. She asked me how long this would take? I told he about 6 months. ( I was still working at the time) 13 months later I finished. It is definitely stressful. I believe if a man or woman puts their mind to something though, it can be done. I’m also a cabinet maker.
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:12 AM   #10
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I believe Native has a great idea. I built my wife an entire kitchen back in 2005. Kids had already moved out, so it was just my wife & I. I could not demo the entire kitchen all at once. She had to function in it. I would rip out a couple of cabinets, get all my measurements, then build her replacements and install them. Constantly rearranging things. She asked me how long this would take? I told he about 6 months. ( I was still working at the time) 13 months later I finished. It is definitely stressful. I believe if a man or woman puts their mind to something though, it can be done. I’m also a cabinet maker.
I'm planning something similar this summer...
My wife asked why are you waiting till summer --

step 1 is building the temporary kitchen in the sun-room. This means temporary sink and counter space. Most meals will be done on the grill which has a burner -- Oh wait -- so far my experience with living in Ohio is that it rains here almost every and in the summer the morning dew is just like rain soo... I'll also need a shelter for the grill -- may move it into the sun room!

step 2 pack all the kitchen contents OUT of the kitchen (fml...)

step 3 is building a partition wall to keep the demo-dust from ruining everything else...

step 4 actually start working on the kitchen remodel...
You see where this is going right...?

Nothing's impossible -- but the increase in arse-pain to work in a space you're also living in...

This can work IF you're living in a warm arid environment where you can pitch a tent next to your bus to sleep in and keep clean clothes. have a bridge table to keep your gas grill on etc... All in an area where theft is of little to NO concern so you can leave your stuff out...

When I lived in my 14' Fireball I hauled my battery's to work for charging and hauled them and full water jugs home... Saved a lot of money that year!
The RV was on a co-workers ranch -- I built fence some of the weekends to cover rent...
I didn't have to worry about anybody stealing anything from my rv or van that served as my shed. If I had to worry about theft I couldn't have done it!
That would cause me to lose my mind...
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:28 AM   #11
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Thank you

There's a lot of great ideas to help and a great deal to think about. This is actually going quicker than I thought it would. Found a spot to put it right away but. There could be theft issue, bylaw issues etc. Plus some of the time frames you guys/gals really has me thinking some more. But here's the low down some more.
I'm in a hot area (in the summer lol) im in southern Alberta Canada.
It'll be an intown parking spot at a friend's business that I'll help with cleaning and promote business around town for him thru decals on my personal little car, business cards etc.
And under 175$ a month to park, use electricity and internet.
Feel like it's a great deal and I trust my friend. We worked together for a few years and always seen eye to eye.
My girlfriend on the other hand is more worried about the kittens ha.
I can store some belongings at my parents place for a bit and the back seats of my car folds down for a bed space in the trunk. Have slept there once or twice while working outta town.

But I'm hoping this will be a good idea idk little bit of stress but... Hope I'll look back on it as a good choice
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:44 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ol trunt View Post
Hmm, don't believe I'd recommend that. How about buying a beat up but functional travel trailer for living in while you build out your bus. The trailer will cost a little up front but you'll easily recoup your $ by selling it when your done. Having a "home base" will allow you to do a better job on the conversion rather than a slap crap job you'll soon learn to hate.
Jack
I moved into my first bus before it was completely finished. It was 80%+ finished. I built the window valances on the parking lot @ Sunset Station in Henderson (Las Vegas). I tiled the bathroom and kitchen at a golf course in Texas.

After that experience I would go along with Ol Trunt. Living in the bus while doing finish projects can, at times, be a real pita. I would not consider moving in without basic systems in place.

The idea of a cheap travel trailer parked next to the bus until you get enough done to move in is definitely worth considering.

I bought a 29' Jayco trailer that is a bit dated. I had to clean it up, replace the living room carpet and a handful of minor repairs. I have used it for about five years including a four month stretch when we went to Mexico. I expect to have my bus livable this summer and will likely sell the trailer for more than I paid for it.

Good luck with your build.
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:51 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 90sKidFatherNow View Post
There's a lot of great ideas to help and a great deal to think about. This is actually going quicker than I thought it would. Found a spot to put it right away but. There could be theft issue, bylaw issues etc. Plus some of the time frames you guys/gals really has me thinking some more. But here's the low down some more.
I'm in a hot area (in the summer lol) im in southern Alberta Canada.
It'll be an intown parking spot at a friend's business that I'll help with cleaning and promote business around town for him thru decals on my personal little car, business cards etc.
And under 175$ a month to park, use electricity and internet.
Feel like it's a great deal and I trust my friend. We worked together for a few years and always seen eye to eye.
My girlfriend on the other hand is more worried about the kittens ha.
I can store some belongings at my parents place for a bit and the back seats of my car folds down for a bed space in the trunk. Have slept there once or twice while working outta town.

But I'm hoping this will be a good idea idk little bit of stress but... Hope I'll look back on it as a good choice
Is this a livein girlfriend? That means TWO people sleeping in the back of your car...? Or do the kittens (messy?) stay at HER place and you can stay there on and off...?

Membership at a local gym covers your shower needs unless work has one.
In my RV living daze I showered at work before coming home -- too easy.

Get you a new/used "job-box" big and obvious, and a great length of anchor chain. Chain the box around the rear axle of the bus. It will be obvious to thieves that you pack all your tools and valuable hardware back into the box at the end of each work session. When the build is done you can re-sell the job-box.

May want to jot down a sheet of notebook paper "expectations" so you and your friend stay friends... Not a formal contract -- just notes of your conversation what you both are expecting to do or not do...
Just helps refresh everybody's memory...
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:21 AM   #14
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Membership at a local gym covers your shower needs unless work has one.

...except for the next three months. The gyms are in big cities and COVID-19 has the gyms closed for now.
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:56 AM   #15
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...except for the next three months. The gyms are in big cities and COVID-19 has the gyms closed for now.
I think I miss the gym more than anything about my normal life. I'm trying to rig up all kinds of wonky stuff with bungee cords, like a DIY bowflex. Fortunately I have a pair of dial-a-weight barbells, at least.
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Old 03-24-2020, 11:01 AM   #16
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Is this a livein girlfriend? That means TWO people sleeping in the back of your car...? Or do the kittens (messy?) stay at HER place and you can stay there on and off...?

Membership at a local gym covers your shower needs unless work has one.
In my RV living daze I showered at work before coming home -- too easy.

Get you a new/used "job-box" big and obvious, and a great length of anchor chain. Chain the box around the rear axle of the bus. It will be obvious to thieves that you pack all your tools and valuable hardware back into the box at the end of each work session. When the build is done you can re-sell the job-box.

May want to jot down a sheet of notebook paper "expectations" so you and your friend stay friends... Not a formal contract -- just notes of your conversation what you both are expecting to do or not do...
Just helps refresh everybody's memory...
Two thoughts:

First, I chained my generator to the frame of my RV using a big heavy chain and the beafyest lock I could find. When I got ready to leave I couldn't find the key to the big burly lock. I finally gave up looking for the key and began a quest for bolt cutters. During the search the gent in the space next door showed up and did not have any bolt cutters either. But he did have two large pile wrenches. He put one on the hasp and one on the body of the lock, gave it a twist and the lock came right apart.

My current setup has the lock in a spot that is hard to reach with any sort of tools and I unlock it and put it inside the RV if I am going to be away for long.

Second, I had a few friends help with my first bus. We did not have any sort of outline of expectations on either side. It ended badly. An outline of project scope and expectations is I very good idea so that when the bus is finished, you still have friends....
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:04 PM   #17
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...except for the next three months. The gyms are in big cities and COVID-19 has the gyms closed for now.
Yeah...

It's hard to change my way thinking to COVID -19 thinking all the time.
You of course are right, and I'm sure this is a real problem already to many on the road people...

Even one of my brothers who owns his own house always showers at the gym just to save time/money; the gym having been his daily routine...
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:16 PM   #18
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Yeah...

It's hard to change my way thinking to COVID -19 thinking all the time.
You of course are right, and I'm sure this is a real problem already to many on the road people...

Even one of my brothers who owns his own house always showers at the gym just to save time/money; the gym having been his daily routine...
I think it will take a long time for most all of us to adjust to this new normal, even if it is a temporary normal [or so I hope].



Back when I was doing the 7-4 grind, I showered at the gym. The gym was way closer to work than home.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:30 PM   #19
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Two thoughts:

First, I chained my generator to the frame of my RV using a big heavy chain and the beafyest lock I could find. When I got ready to leave I couldn't find the key to the big burly lock. I finally gave up looking for the key and began a quest for bolt cutters. During the search the gent in the space next door showed up and did not have any bolt cutters either. But he did have two large pile wrenches. He put one on the hasp and one on the body of the lock, gave it a twist and the lock came right apart.
SNIP....
A BIG BURLY lock is not necessarily a better lock...

I remember having to move a HUMVEE -- the key for the padlock that secures the steel cable going through the steering wheel couldn't be found...

We got hold of a two foot long set of bolt cutters from Supply. I'd seen these cutters cut other locks like pliers cutting wire. 25 year young burly biceps (not mine!) with two feet of leverage -- when the metal breaking sound came it was the divot the lock left in the cutting edge of the bolt-cutters!

There are locks, and there are locks...

A properly designed job-box protects the lock from implements of leverage and cutting/grinding.
You could secure the chain by driving the bus over it...

I figure anyone using liquid nitrogen, cutting torches, and other neat sh!t is a dedicated problem thief -- I don't think I present as worth all that...
I just wanna dissuade the typical opioid-punk/bored kid from breaking my doors & windows to pilfer stuff for it's pockets...
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:58 PM   #20
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There are locks, and there are locks...

A properly designed job-box protects the lock from implements of leverage and cutting/grinding.


...
Yes there are. And I have found that there are bolt cutters and there are Bolt Cutters. We bought a set in order to cut a lock off and even with two of us trying to manhandle the bolt cutters. We walked over to the County Roads Shop and asked if they could grind it off. The gent chuckled and pulled out another set of bolt cutters that cut the lock with ease. I guess that the oats really are cheaper after the horse.

The feature you mentioned on the job box lock is just what I was describing. You can touch the lock and reach to unlock it but there is no room to get any tools to the lock.

Fortunately most scumbag generator thief's don't carry liquid nitrogen with them.
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