Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-09-2020, 02:08 PM   #121
Almost There
 
DrDanger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Big Rapids, MI
Posts: 80
Year: 2005
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466E
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
many of these inside units have 2 drain pipes in the tray.. only one is typically drilled open to the outside.. several peoiple have alleviated the water drip issues by opening that other hole and having two drain lines. as that way even if your bus is parked tilted the water will drain properly..
Yeah, I saw that. It has been working well so far since I moved the outlet. At this point I don't want to temp fate by messing with it any more
__________________
Just some pilgrims, building a skookie

https://www.instagram.com/pilgrim_days/
DrDanger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2020, 07:44 PM   #122
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 4
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Goshen Coach
Engine: 7.3L Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 23
It looks like they sprayed open cell onto metal. They should have used CLOSED cell foam on metal. I had a warehouse metal sprayed. Open-cell spray foam has an R-value of about R-3.7 per inch, while closed-cell spray foam has an R-value that may be as high as R-6.5 per inch.
NOLA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2020, 04:32 AM   #123
Almost There
 
DrDanger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Big Rapids, MI
Posts: 80
Year: 2005
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466E
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA View Post
It looks like they sprayed open cell onto metal. They should have used CLOSED cell foam on metal.

It is closed cell. I think the mix wasn't quite right at the beginning (or end) of the job because I only have problems in a few places in the back. The front is totally fine. I've given up caring because most of it is behind wood now!
__________________
Just some pilgrims, building a skookie

https://www.instagram.com/pilgrim_days/
DrDanger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2020, 04:54 AM   #124
Almost There
 
DrDanger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Big Rapids, MI
Posts: 80
Year: 2005
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466E
Rated Cap: 72
Built my first drawers ever today. I didn't quite get the side spacing right for the slides, but thankfully I had erred too much in the right direction and was able to fix it with a long shim strip. I am using the Accuride Touch Release slides here so I won't have any drawer handles to trip over/kick. They seem to work pretty well so far, we'll see how they do once they are loaded up and I go around a hard right turn.






Also, I think I have figured out a solution to my water heater venting problem, but this is how I felt the last few days...


__________________
Just some pilgrims, building a skookie

https://www.instagram.com/pilgrim_days/
DrDanger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2020, 09:46 PM   #125
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,333
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
I *LOVE* your dino-toon!
Native is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2020, 07:53 AM   #126
Almost There
 
DrDanger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Big Rapids, MI
Posts: 80
Year: 2005
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466E
Rated Cap: 72
Question Battery questions

I purchased some used Valence lithium batteries from ebay a while ago and just got the rest of my electrical components so now I am building a small system to do a bench test.

One thing I discovered is that the bolts that go into the battery are not all the same size and also the positive and negative terminal holes are not the same depth. Say whaaaa???
The result is that the positive bolts tighten down well, but the negative bolts bottom out in the hole before the battery cable is tight and secure. This is ok where I have two cable connections (the ends of each series where they are connected in parallel to the other series), but the middle of each series is loose on the negative terminal. I am thinking of either cutting off the end of those bolts or else add a metal washer.

The question I have is if I get metal washers, what material should they be? Stainless steel? Copper? Other???
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_20200925_082136450_HDR.jpg (163.1 KB, 5 views)
__________________
Just some pilgrims, building a skookie

https://www.instagram.com/pilgrim_days/
DrDanger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2020, 10:56 AM   #127
Bus Crazy
 
Ronnie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,666
Year: 1971
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: International Loadstar 1700
Engine: 345 international V-8
Copper is the best conductivity. However you could likely get away with plain old zinc plated steel.
Ronnie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2020, 11:22 AM   #128
Mini-Skoolie
 
HazeltheMooseWagon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 25
Year: 1996
Coachwork: International AmTran
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: International DT466
Rated Cap: 65 passenger - 27,500 GVW
If you use anything except copper you should probably put the washer on top of the lug. Copper washers could go above or under the lug.
HazeltheMooseWagon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×