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Old 03-12-2021, 02:45 PM   #1781
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You are making GREAT progress Musigenesis. Keep on keepin on !!!

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Old 03-12-2021, 05:10 PM   #1782
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Still not exactly sure how you're supposed to secure a propane oven, but it looks like mine was held in with four screws run into the framing from underneath the lift-up stovetop. Decided to build the framing the stove is attached to first, and then build to that. I want to be able to remove the stove itself from the framing if necessary, but also I want the entire thing that supports the stove to be removable and replaceable with something for a larger stove.

These notches will let me put flush trim all around the stove.

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Figured these holes in the side of my PROPANE STOVE were important and should not be blocked by the frame.

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Old 03-15-2021, 07:33 PM   #1783
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I had the weekend to marinate my idea about the oven collar and decided to scrap it. Too much extra structure would be needed to deal with the extra structure I added.

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Starting over. The oven is anchored at the top with two screws in each corner (for 8 total) that go through little bumps in the side that keep the oven spaced from whatever it's screwed into; the oven has no other fixed attachment of any kind. It rests on four projections pressed down from the bottom panel and there are two other pressed-out bumps at the bottom front that keep the oven spaced from the sides. So I'm trying to do the bare minimum structure that will support just those bumps, since the oven is not meant to touch anywhere else anyway.

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Magically mirror-duplicated.

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Testing the position. This left edge needs to be in line with the raised floor edge since my hinged countertop will be flush against it.

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I need to raise the level on the sink framing that the butcher block will rest on by 1" to bring it to the same height as the hinged countertop (I want to keep them flush for esthetics). Conveniently I can also use these raisers to tie in this side's oven support.

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This space underneath will be 7" high and deep enough for my pizza paddles etc. Not sure if I'm going to make this a slide-out drawer or just have a hinged cover that opens downward.

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Old 03-16-2021, 05:40 PM   #1784
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To get my 10" tall sink to 40" from the dropped floor, I built the base at 30". I want the butcher block here to be at the same height as the hinged countertop left of the stove (which will be at 30.25" from the un-dropped part of the floor), so I needed to go up 1.25". Conveniently, this gave me an easy way to tie the right oven support to the sink base.

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Making sure the oven still fits.

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Not totally sure how I'm going to attach the butcher block here without screwing down from above, as the space is kind of tight underneath. I need to order a drill extender.

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Framing for the hinged countertop/table. This will be beefed up a bit.

Since this plus the left-side support for the oven are a separate framed unit, if I ever get a wider oven I'll be able to unscrew the unit and move it left as far as necessary. If I get a taller one, I can move the supports at the bottom down.

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Testing out the piece of butcher block. Going to cut it down the middle and hinge it, with a foot-operated latch to keep it in the down position.

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Still planning a cable to the ceiling to hold it level. I've never really liked the feel of those sliding/pullout support underbracket things like are often used on something like this, just too sloppy a feel, and this material is particularly heavy. If I'm going to use this for stuff like dough-making, it needs to be very firm.

Anybody have good alternatives?

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Once again a cabinet space has come out a lot larger than I was anticipating. I'm going to make this basically open, with two stainless-steel basket-type shelves for storing kitchen utensils and pots and whatnot, accessible from either front or side, so I can get at stuff without raising the hinged part, if necessary.

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Old 03-17-2021, 08:12 AM   #1785
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Had a couple of ideas last night. One is for this cabinet under the table/countertop here. It's difficult to sit at a table or countertop if there isn't room underneath for your legs, so I'm thinking that instead of building fixed shelves here, I'll build a rolling cart that just fits into the space. I'll still use it for storage but roll it out if anybody needs to sit there.

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Related to that, I was originally going to put my diesel air heater at the base of this cabinet, but then I decided to put it under my couch. I'm wondering if it's possible to mount the diesel heater on a little cart with flexible hoses to fixed holes in the floor, making it possible to move it around a bit.
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Old 03-17-2021, 05:52 PM   #1786
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Stiffening the framing.

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These bits are to complete the raised part around the back of the stove, which is just cosmetic.

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Oven placed and temporarily screwed via the four top holes.

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Once I was sure it was placed properly, I put in #14 wood screws in the four lower holes and removed the top framing screws. The top screws seem to warp the oven outwards, so I'm going to rely on just the four bottom ones.

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There will be a flat piece of trim on top of this, but otherwise it will be open to the back and below.

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Stop for the oven for when I slide it in. Not really needed otherwise.

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This ended up further right than I had planned but I really like the layout.

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The raised bit will allow airflow into these holes for the range. I'm going to cover the raised bit with 5mm paneling and I'm going to incorporate some sort of vent into them for these holes as well.

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Old 03-19-2021, 05:39 PM   #1787
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Chaise deconstruction

My two-piece chaise lounge is 37" deep and I have a 30" deep space for it, so it needs to get itself chopped. No idea how this thing is put together, so I cut the bottom and back off to get a looksee. I'm going to salvage this spring since it's a big part of how comfortable this thing is.

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I was also going to salvage some of the back rest part, but it's nothing but OSB and nylon lawn chair webbing. It's just amazing the prices on furniture built like this - I got the two chaise pieces free but the woman who bought the whole set paid something like four grand.

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Not sure yet how the springs are attached on the ends, but they seem to be tied to the sides with scraps of the outer fabric.

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I managed to scalp the back rest fabric. I won't use the framing but I'll wrap this over something else for the back rest.

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This was the biggest piece I could cut off the back. I'll use this for a 15"x15" ottoman.

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This back rest part took just two swings of the sledge on each side to knock it free. All staples and glue.

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The bare essence of chaise.

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These little clips conveniently have screw holes so I'll have an easier time re-mounting them on a new frame. These will be attached to a rectangle of 2x2 screwed to an angle iron frame so it will be stronger and a lot flatter than the original frame.

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I guess I will migrate these fabric ties as well, unless I can think of something better.

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Should be kind of fun rebuilding this.
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Old 03-19-2021, 08:17 PM   #1788
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The things you never imagine yourself doing when you decide to convert a bus!
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Old 03-19-2021, 09:02 PM   #1789
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Quote:
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The things you never imagine yourself doing when you decide to convert a bus!
Ha ha, actually I always figured some poor couch was going to pay the price.
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Old 03-20-2021, 09:57 PM   #1790
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Tore apart the other piece of my chaise today. I got a nice large chunk of the fabric from the back, which was all a single piece wrapped around the corner.

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I was going to disconnect the clips holding these springs to the wood and reattach them to new framing, but I think that will not be so easy after looking at them more closely. I'm going to try to keep the two pieces of wood the springs are currently attached to, and incorporate them into the new frame.

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Not going to use this piece of OSB, but keeping it to remind me what the original angle was. For simplicity, I should just make these angled back pieces out of plywood and paint it, but I'm going to at least attempt to pad them and wrap them in the gray fabric.

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I'm excited to have a go at rebuilding this thing.
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Old 03-22-2021, 08:16 PM   #1791
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More chaise modding in today's lovely weather.

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I should have removed these two pieces and the strips of fabric, but I thought they might play a role in stretching these springs out, since I'm pretty sure that's why they were there in the first place.

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Got the springs and the pieces of wood they're clipped to separated. Just a few more whacks with the sledge did it. Staples are just the saddest and most useless member of the fastener genus.

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L-frame piece ripped out of a 2x4. My 2x4s are such absolute garbage I could barely cut this piece because of the table saw getting pinched.

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My hard maple blanks showed up. I took a guess that these would match my butcher block countertop material and they do, perfectly. I'm going to use them to build my backsplashes for the counters and the trim around the oven.

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Back to the chaise.

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Still wasn't sure how I was going to be able to stretch the springs, but I finished off the frame. Not shown here are a number of failed attempts to get enough leverage, some of which involved 2x4s snapping back at my face. These springs aren't garage door springs but they ain't playin'.

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Finally managed it by screwing these two temporary strips down over the springs to flatten them, then I could wedge the disconnected end piece with the hooks into place and re-attach it to the frame. That is when I realized that the strips of fabric must have originally been used to do the same thing and flatten the springs, then they loosened the strips after the springs were secured in place.

The upright piece I temporarily screwed on so I could keep the end piece oriented correctly against the tension while I was screwing it back in place.

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Squared the frame off and braced the corners.

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Removed the spring-compressing strips.

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Re-stapled the original foam pad.

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Re-stapled the edge padding.

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Realized the front piece wasn't long enough to wrap around the 2x4 base, so I was going to have to reinstall the little decorative front strip.

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I probably should have replaced the original paper backing strip for this (just amazing the cheapness that goes into making this kind of thing) but too lazy.

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Looks a lot better than I thought it would.

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Wrapped around the underside and stapled.

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I'm going to keep the labels, of course.

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Tried out the cushion. This piece had an extra bit of foam on these corners that I decided not to put back on the new frame, and it's made the corners a little droopy and loose in the overlapped part, but not too bad. I will probably add hooks for the two ottomans that will go at the end of this, and I'll use that hardware to draw in the fabric here.

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I was surprised at how much difference those springs make over having the cushions on a hard surface like plywood. Hopefully worth nearly breaking my face.
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Old 03-22-2021, 09:59 PM   #1792
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"Staples are just the saddest and most useless member of the fastener genus."
ROFLMAO
But then...
"Re-stapled the original foam pad (& edge padding)..."
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Old 03-22-2021, 10:07 PM   #1793
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Quote:
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"Staples are just the saddest and most useless member of the fastener genus."
ROFLMAO
But then...
"Re-stapled the original foam pad (& edge padding)..."
Ha ha, I guess they're good for some things. Just maybe not for holding together the framing of your furniture (or your mobile home).
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Old 03-23-2021, 05:53 PM   #1794
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Couch, Day X

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The furniture clamp idea didn't work, but since I at least had the springs resting on the lip of the wood holding the hooks, I was able to get a big screwdriver under the end of each spring and pry it up and over onto the hook.

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Squared up and braced.

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Head board thing will be roughly this shape. On the original, it sloped down to the base of the cushions like here, leaving a little open triangle of space behind the cushion. I'm not sure if I'm going to do the same or have a short wall thing that comes up to the top of the cushion and then slopes back. I guess it lets the big fluffy upper cushions have a little nook to fit into.

The fabric on the bottom piece in that corner was cut a little too much. Once I figure out how I'm going to do the side of the headboard, I'll have to come up with something to cover that.

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Old 03-25-2021, 07:26 PM   #1795
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This little broken bit of sheet metal in the door of my Z3 just cost me $800 and a three-hour round trip into the Poconos, and I now have a new door with a big scratch in it that I'm going to have to Bondo up. Just so I can have a window that goes up and down.

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Putting together the base frame for my couch.

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On the original couch this corner was covered by a piece of fabric from the back rest, so I needed to improvise something for it. Stapled a piece on backwards and then folded it over and stapled above and below.

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Looks better than I thought it would.

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Screwed on the end support.

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Other corner needed a piece to cover, same deal.

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Screwed the two base pieces together.

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Added front trim and center support posts.

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Temp blocks to support the base until it's screwed into the two full-height 2x4s under the paneling in this corner. I'll probably remove the front one but keep the one in the corner, since it's damned hard to get under there with a drill.

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Base screwed into place with shims. This corner is a long way from square - good thing there will be a couch here to hide it.

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Testing out the cushions. I just know I'm going to destroy these things before I even get a chance to live on them. I already accidentally put a sharpie mark on the back of one of them.

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The cushions here are about 20" off the floor, a few inches higher than normal. My ottomans at the foot will also be 20" high, which will extend the couch and also let me use them as seats at the kitchen table. This leaves about 10" underneath the couch which is not great, but enough for some drawers at least. The storage ottomans will add some to that.

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Old 03-25-2021, 08:47 PM   #1796
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
This little broken bit of sheet metal in the door of my Z3 just cost me $800 and a three-hour round trip into the Poconos, and I now have a new door with a big scratch in it that I'm going to have to Bondo up. Just so I can have a window that goes up and down.

Attachment 55581
BMW Z3?


They are known for lousy "window regulators" (and a lot more, unfortunately, when they get older. Watch the plastic stuff... Sporty as hell when new, though). These units make the window go up and down, and guide it as it moves, and are riveted to the the door. Drill out the rivets and you can get (could have gotten) a new "window regulator" (I find them for a better price on eBay). You can rivet it in, or install it with small bolts and washers and nylock nuts.


At least that looks like what broke from what I see and your description. Maybe you could fix your old door for less $$$ and work than the bondo and paint.


your build looks great! congrats on wrangling that awnry chair into laying flat.


Aloha!
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Old 03-25-2021, 09:16 PM   #1797
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BMW Z3?

They are known for lousy "window regulators" (and a lot more, unfortunately, when they get older. Watch the plastic stuff... Sporty as hell when new, though). These units make the window go up and down, and guide it as it moves, and are riveted to the the door. Drill out the rivets and you can get (could have gotten) a new "window regulator" (I find them for a better price on eBay). You can rivet it in, or install it with small bolts and washers and nylock nuts.

At least that looks like what broke from what I see and your description. Maybe you could fix your old door for less $$$ and work than the bondo and paint.

your build looks great! congrats on wrangling that awnry chair into laying flat.

Aloha!
Thanks! Forcing furniture to be what you want it to be is kind of fun.

Yeah, BMW Z3. This is my second one, had it for four years - my first one lasted me nine years and now my cousin owns it. It's really not bad to get nine years out of an $11K car - it would be the cheapest prorated car I've ever owned if not for the $325 Rabbit that lasted me three years. And if you didn't count repairs.

I was going to try to DIY this window/door problem, but I really have a finite amount of mental energy to devote to figuring out how to do stuff, and the skoolie takes it all. I figured that fixing this door would probably take me a week or two - with most of that time devoted to figuring out how to get the door apart and back together again without breaking any of the little plastic fiddly bits.

I really was super-lucky to find a driver's side door the same color as my car, an hour and a half away for $200. And the Poconos are beautiful this time of year.
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Old 03-25-2021, 11:12 PM   #1798
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That couch looks great!
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Old 03-26-2021, 12:22 AM   #1799
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Finally found what is apparently the only pic I ever took of this sectional sofa thing before it got the axe.

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Old 03-26-2021, 12:26 AM   #1800
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That couch looks great!
Thanks, I'm pretty happy with it so far. I might never be willing to sit on it once it's done, which could be a problem.
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