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Old 02-10-2016, 10:46 AM   #561
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Nice work there! Keep the pix coming.

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Old 02-14-2016, 05:05 AM   #562
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Door structure put together, and its skinned. The filler panel forward of the hinge is clecoed into place.

Everything seems to fit and line up. Next is some minor detail work on the door, and the inner seal frame on the vehicle side. Eventually I'll get the windows for the bus - I am planning on two windows, a curb view low one and a high one. I thought about figuring out how to make the bottom window a doggie door.






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Old 02-16-2016, 03:52 AM   #563
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Some more door stuff.







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Old 02-16-2016, 09:49 AM   #564
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Man...you cannot imagine how much I envy anyone with a flat door. Putting mine together was a shipbuilders nightmare. Finally got it to fit, then the whole thing racked out of shape just enough that I now need to force it (somehow) back into shape.
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Old 02-16-2016, 10:25 AM   #565
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That door looks great!

My only comment is I hope you are not a very tall person. If you are I think you will find your top hinge is going to be blocking your view out to that side of the bus.

The early Prevost H3 buses had a cross bar at about the same height. It didn't bother short drivers but it was right in the middle of the way for me.

Your attention to detail and the quality of your work is commendable. I doubt you would be able to pay for that kind of quality in any shop regardless of price.
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Old 02-16-2016, 10:41 AM   #566
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I'm glad someone mentioned visibility from that angle - I think I kept sliding that upper hinge around for like an hour trying to balance optimal physics with practicality. The compromise is at my tallest in the air ride seat, I can just see a bit of the horizon once I stick a window in the door.

I'll get a lower window too - and I was planning on a tiny kidney bean window in that space between what I guess would be called the a pillar and the forward door seal.

Thanks for comments it helps keep things moving.

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Originally Posted by cowlitzcoach View Post
That door looks great!

My only comment is I hope you are not a very tall person. If you are I think you will find your top hinge is going to be blocking your view out to that side of the bus.

The early Prevost H3 buses had a cross bar at about the same height. It didn't bother short drivers but it was right in the middle of the way for me.

Your attention to detail and the quality of your work is commendable. I doubt you would be able to pay for that kind of quality in any shop regardless of price.
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Old 02-16-2016, 10:48 AM   #567
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I unhung and rehung that door about eleventy hundred times to make sure I didn't accidently bend it out of shape when mocking it up. A while ago after I read your build posts I decided a flat door was for me and took note of the trouble you had, so what you had to go through wasn't entirely a loss. (Thanks!)

If your door is parallelized just slightly wrong and you have the skin on it, you'll need to release the tension in the sheet metal first. Easier to figure it out If I could poke at it though.



Quote:
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Man...you cannot imagine how much I envy anyone with a flat door. Putting mine together was a shipbuilders nightmare. Finally got it to fit, then the whole thing racked out of shape just enough that I now need to force it (somehow) back into shape.
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Old 02-21-2016, 01:05 AM   #568
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OK, so door is done enough for now. The interior framework has needed attention. Once it is painted and bolted into place again, I can start adding walls, lights, chases for plumbing and wiring etc.



So start by unbolting everything, then a little wire wheel, flap disc, and 3m scotchbrite pad action, then a little cleaning with a fresh painter rag and lacquer thinner.



I would love to powdercoat all the pieces but pretty much everything is cost prohibitive for me.



I've found that if you have a decently prepped surface this combination of paint works well for bare metal, the rustoleum acid etch primer and their "professional" spray paint. They are both high build products that dry fast.



Perfect for penny pinching impatient people like me.

The weather is crappy but we had a sunny break today and took advantage of it as much as possible. I got a large chunk of the framework painted but it seems never ending.


I still have a few large pieces bolted in that have to come out, and I haven't even gotten to the kitchen cabinet system yet.

Before I bolt everything back in, I'll be installing the finished interior wall covering in many places which should give the appearance of some actual progress.

Once all the framing I have now is bolted into place I'll get to work on the drawers and stuff for the kitchen. The pantry is a full height (78 inch) pull out system, and a bunch of drawers and stuff that I fabricated earlier. I'm looking forward to that part.

I'm guessing I'm still missing a few framework pieces, notably the crossover partitions from left to right, sliding door for the master bed in back, the shower stall framing, and the slider for the bathroom.

The shower will be interesting, I plan on using a 30x30 4 piece shower kit.

Any opinions on shower footprint size?
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:59 AM   #569
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Any opinions on shower footprint size?
Yeah Aaron, I like my New Balance 10& 1/2 extra wide casual walking sneakers for my footprint........ Wait, maybe some shower flip flops.....

Seriously though (sometimes I can't help my puns), my shower is 28" X 30" right above the rear cargo bay on the driver's side. Found 30" a bit too intrusive into the hallway.
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Old 02-21-2016, 01:35 PM   #570
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Curiosity killing cats.....
I HAVE to ask - WHAT is that "black-straight pipe/elbow-plug-red hose-THING" behind the chop saw......in the shop-painting-pic......!

thjakits
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:52 PM   #571
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That my friend is the unimog cab tipping cylinder monsterpiece that I have. I just had the ram and not the special pump, so it has been forced to work with a domestic pump which necessitates a larger reservoir of hydraulic fluid.

Its a hackjob but it works. Keep your eyes peeled for other goodies I may throw into photos for future preludes to bus things too.

Photo of tipped unimog cab.





Quote:
Originally Posted by thjakits View Post
Curiosity killing cats.....
I HAVE to ask - WHAT is that "black-straight pipe/elbow-plug-red hose-THING" behind the chop saw......in the shop-painting-pic......!

thjakits
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Old 02-21-2016, 08:53 PM   #572
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Cool

EXCELLENT!!
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Old 02-22-2016, 01:00 AM   #573
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All the framing that I have is now painted, it's just sort of hanging out for a bit so the paint can harden more.

I think I remember where all this stuff is supposed to go.

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Old 02-26-2016, 01:44 AM   #574
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Getting some finish wall covering installed. Don't mind all the dirty handprints. The surface washes with a rag or even Mr clean magic eraser. Sharpie pens just disappear! Its a good kid resistant surface.

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Old 02-26-2016, 09:23 AM   #575
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Looks good...what is the interior finish?
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Old 02-26-2016, 10:55 AM   #576
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Its an .0625 plastic sheeting, made from the same stuff as milkjugs. Its not really structural, and its designed for gluing onto surfaces.

In this case I'm using FRP rivets instead of glue to hold in place which works quite nice. I've done some extended wear tests in the unimog and it seems to hold up.

The main reason for the paranoia is it says "not for use in rv" in tiny letters somewhere, but I think that's when used with an adhesive. My guess is the material is somewhat sensitive to thermal expansion and contraction. Install while it is hot, and it will shrink slightly. When cold it will expand during heating. So just install at nominal temp and fasten it instead of glue and it'll be fine.


http://www.lowes.com/pd_72405-44905-...ductId=3436816

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Looks good...what is the interior finish?
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Old 03-02-2016, 03:52 AM   #577
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OK, frame going back together. This time with proper fasteners and locktite.

I ordered a bunch of windows off eBay so those should be here in a week or two.

All the windows are missing their "trim ring" but it wouldn't help if I had them, the wall thickness is 3.5" thick and trim rings don't go that deep. I managed to find a window to replace the drivers school bus style slider window with a transit style as well.

I can't wait to cut big holes in the bus.

Lots to do, not a lot of time lately.

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Old 03-02-2016, 11:35 AM   #578
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Most folks don't realize just how much expansion and contraction takes place with many plastics. Vinyl siding, for example, requires an allowance for something like a quarter inch each way for every ten feet. That's a LOT of movement. You will notice that all of the pre-drilled nail holes are quite elongated. Thermal properties are definitely something to investigate before investing in any particular material.
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Old 03-07-2016, 01:59 AM   #579
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More paneling installed.
Got the insulation behind the bunks complete, and fitted the odd shaped panels behind it.

I think the next thing will be some misc framing to connect the sides, and the galley and pantry cabinets.

Windows show up next week, I have an air nibbler ready to chop big holes in both sides of the bus, it'll be great I'm sure.
  1. Foam core ply fiber glass composite sandwich
  2. Corrugated sheet metal
  3. Chip board ply painted with spar varnish
  4. Luan with foam core glued (similar to first, just no fiberglass)
  5. political signs stolen from peoples front yards (it is an election year) and glued into panels

I kind of like #4 but I'm concerned about how brittle it might be.
#3 was my first choice in the plan, but it gets heavy and I thought maybe I don't want so much wood.

Some progress photos.


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Old 03-07-2016, 05:51 AM   #580
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Oh look, a pfennig!
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