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Old 02-09-2014, 09:24 AM   #21
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Never have seen heaters that size....cool.

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Old 02-09-2014, 10:40 AM   #22
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

you are progressing quite well
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Old 02-09-2014, 11:26 AM   #23
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by proconsul100
you are progressing quite well

And having fun to it looks like! Rock on guys!
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Old 02-09-2014, 07:43 PM   #24
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

I was able to get most of the metal specks from the grinder out of the glass with a fresh blade from a utility knife. Slide it along the glass at a close angle and you'll feel it catching the specks. Worked ok, but they won't ever be back to their former glory.
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Old 02-13-2014, 12:34 PM   #25
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by inkblots84
Quote:
Originally Posted by proconsul100
you are progressing quite well

And having fun to it looks like! Rock on guys!
Thanks yall also, Jazty, good call on that. I'm gonna give it a shot and shoot a video of the mistakes I have made so far as well, to help out other folks in the future. Also, here's a video I made so far of our progress.

http://youtu.be/s8XyOhgkecs

Also, if you wall are facebook users, and would like to follow the project page, that would be rad too https://www.facebook.com/peatmoss.buss
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Old 02-13-2014, 02:55 PM   #26
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Your doing great on the progress.

OSB stands for Oriented strand board. It is stronger than plywood on edge (like sheeting walls) but 30% weaker than plywood laying down.

OSB swells with any water just like laminate flooring. It is a realy poor choice for a floor.

The original plywood lasted the life of the bus. OSB would not last a year under the same conditions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriented_strand_board

RTV silicone causes rust. A urethane sealant, or acoustical sealant would have been a better choice. Silicone will release and leak, where the acoustical sealant never drys and is able to move through the hot to cold expansion and contraction.

As long as you don't plan on having your bus for too long none of this will be a issue. However for the sake of others reading these build threads for knowledge, I needed to post this.

Take care and keep on keeping on.

Nat
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Old 02-13-2014, 03:06 PM   #27
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Quote:
Silicone will release and leak, where the acoustical sealant never drys and is able to move through the hot to cold expansion and contraction.
Good news for me! I don't have much construction experience, but acoustical sealant (the black kind, not the grey stuff) seemed similar to automotive seam sealer, but much cheaper so I went with it. Lots of it. Between every external metal overlap. I'm happy to hear it was a good idea from someone in the trade!

EDIT:
Clean up is a pain, BTW. Paint thinner will take it off, though, with some elbow grease.
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Old 04-17-2014, 01:34 AM   #28
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Sorry for the long time of no posting, but I have been busting my chops trying to make some money to work on the bus. It's hard when you're living in the darn thing while you're workin on it, but hey, gotta get it done right? Here is the laminate flooring I scored. It was 200 bucks after I talked lumber liquidators down. It was 11.5 boxes of flooring, and I had another 2.5 boxes leftover. I got a pricematch on a home depot deal and only paid for 1/3 of the flooring i got. The rest of the flooring was damaged from bad pallet use in the warehouse so I got some of the boxes for free. Heck yes!


We patched the few screw holes that were about from old signage, and the stop sign, etc. Then I threw up some insulation. The framing is for the birch paneling.


Here is the birch paneling.


Here is the framework for the cabinet. I made it really strong just incase i wanted to work on rebuilding transmissions or engines on my truck or other future vehicles.







Here is some more of the paneling, window trim, and tongue and groove ceiling.






Here is the nifty LED lights I scored. Only 5 Watts!



Tongue & Groove (my favorite)


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Old 04-17-2014, 02:11 AM   #29
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Wow, that's some nice wood work.

Good to hear from you again.

Nat
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Old 04-17-2014, 10:05 AM   #30
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Really great lookin' work Dude! --- And I really like the "pencil groove" paneling. Planning on using some of it myself...if I can ever get freed up to work on my bus again. Gonna be a sweet interior from what I can see. Keep the pix coming!
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Old 04-17-2014, 10:11 AM   #31
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Great work! I really like the decorative shelf brackets and the generally liberal use of wood everywhere!
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Old 04-17-2014, 02:29 PM   #32
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Do your homework before you blithely accept anything ANYONE posts on the internet. That includes me and this post. Ask questions, then go research the answers you got. Do not stop at a single webpage. Use a search engine like Ixquick. Be a smart consumer.

OSB has been used in the US for decades as a subfloor on houses. Basic way of building many houses is to put the floor joists in, cover the joists with OSB and, after it has been rained on a few times, wall framing built then stand the walls up. Later the roof rafters are covered with OSB, it is rained on again a few times, and then cover with roofing paper and asphalt shingles. Bear in mind that not all OSB's are the same. Read this http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/r...b-plywood.html. We have never had any OSB fall apart from getting wet but we have always used OSB used for roofing/flooring. We have even left it outside in high rainfall areas for a couple of years. Warped but did not fall apart.

We have Norbord's OSB that is spec'ed for flooring and roof underlayment in our bus. It is being used for the underlayment for the VCT. Most (but not all) of what you will buy stocked in the big box US home improvement stores will be the water resistant variety rated for roof decking and floor underlayment. If you are unsure, ASK someone who works all the time in the lumber section or ASK someone at the Pro or Contractors desk.

I can tell you for sure that if you bought OSB (not particle- or fiberboard) in the place I work at (Home Depot #3510,Roswell, NM) you would be buying Norbord brand OSB that is rated as suitable for using as roof decking and/or floor underlayment which is water resistant. I cannot say that about any other store.

If you actually take the time to READ a previously posted link (reposted below), you will see that some of the OSB is water resistant and suitable for underlayment flooring. Not waterproof though. You need marine plywood (made with a special glue and NOT the same as exterior grade plywood) for that and that isn't cheap. It used to be reasonably priced but prices for it started climbing in the early 90's. It is also gotten harder to find unless you are near the ocean (in our experience).

Quote:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oriented_strand_board
Properties
Adjustments to the manufacturing process can impart differences in thickness, panel size, strength, and rigidity. OSB panels have no internal gaps or voids, and are water-resistant, although they do require additional membranes to achieve impermeability to water and are not recommended for exterior use. The finished product has properties similar to plywood, but is uniform and cheaper.[5] When tested to failure, OSB has a greater load-bearing capacity than milled wood panels.[6] It has replaced plywood in many environments, especially the North American structural panel market.
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Old 04-17-2014, 02:58 PM   #33
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

What is with the sudden love for formaldehyde soaked pressed wood?

Yes google formaldehyde and decide if you want to live with the stuff.

High end houses here use plywood where budget houses use OSB. That is fact.

If you normally use 3/4 plywood as subfloor, you would have to step up to 7/8th OSB.

Not all home depo's will carry OSB from the same mill. They buy where ever they get the best deal with minimum trucking cost.

Here VCT commercial tile will not pass code if installed on OSB. Just like ceramic, porcelain, and stone tile can not be installed on OSB.

The homes built over the last ten years that use OSB as a FIRST layer of the sub floor, only have a 50 year expected life span. That's right, the house is ready for tear down, or major renovation by the time you pay off your mortgage.

20 years ago, the first layer of subfloor was 1x6 or 1x8. Far superior in every way.

OSB has vary little strength laying flat on floors and roofs. Constant foot traffic causes the fibers to delaminate.

OSB is stronger than plywood standing up on edge like on wall sheeting.

Don't try to up play a crappy, disposable product of the modern disposable age.

Water resistant don't mean squat. So you can get it wet 4 times vs twice with non water resistant before is swells and comes apart.

They don't build boat from OSB. This should tell you something.

If all you can afford is $8 sheets of OSB vs $18 sheets of better plywood, then use it.

Lorna, you want to hash this out, start a dedicated thread. I would be happy to show the facts.



Nat
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Old 04-17-2014, 05:48 PM   #34
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

I don't "discuss" anything with Natster. I promised Sara. If Natster has a problem with that, he can take it up with Sara. Anyone else... Do your own research and decide what will work for yourself. I simply put out an alternative to another poster's biased personal view. That poster is not the only one with hands-on experience in construction. Remember, there is no single "right" way to convert a bus despite what some folks say. Please, please do your research before using products that you are unfamilar with. Building in a mobile enviroment is not the same as a non-mobile enviroment. If you see a product mentioned that sounds potentially useful, look it up on the internet and after gathering up the facts as they apply to your situation, then you can decide if it would work for you.
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Old 04-17-2014, 06:29 PM   #35
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by lornaschinske
I don't "discuss" anything with Natster. I promised Sara.
Ahh, I see what has happened here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lornaschinske
Remember, there is no single "right" way to convert a bus despite what some folks say.
Where have you been hiding? We got that all figured out a few months ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lornaschinske
That poster is not the only one with hands-on experience in construction.
True, but some go thew life looking and not seeing, others are able to pic out the details, and learn from everything we do. Just because it's accepted in a field of construction, don't mean it's a good product.
Also our building methods are constantly evolving. 20 year old experience is only worth so much with modern products.

Good to see you still around Lorna.

OSB is like laminate flooring. Looks good at the time, cheap, easy to use, but in the end, it always ends up a swollen, bulged, ugly, wet mess.

Nat
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Old 04-18-2014, 12:21 AM   #36
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Re: The Peat Moss Bus :)

Having had prior experience with grossly swollen OSB and conventional ply...I am planning on using only "marine grade" ply. More expensive yes...but I've yet to find a bus or RV that didn't leak...no mater how well it was built/sealed.
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