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Old 05-12-2019, 03:09 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marceps View Post
Lug wrench, mineral spirits, two tire irons, core removal tool, and a torque wrench:



I'm with jazty and Seriousracer. You can do this.
I was saying you can do it


But watch the video. I have had one explosion of a tire it is an eye opener.

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Old 05-12-2019, 03:20 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seriousracer View Post
I was saying you can do it


But watch the video. I have had one explosion of a tire it is an eye opener.
l've seen it done roadside using two wraps of heavy chain as a safe guard
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Old 05-12-2019, 04:14 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by CMORGANSKOOL View Post
The vintage OSHA video is the scariest tire explosion. I hope my tires don't explode. However I think there would be no mobile truck tire service people left in the world if all these tires were exploding everywhere. I bet anyone can pull and mount a 22.5 tire and all this "Danger" talk is just a conspiracy to keep everyone going to the shop to get this work done.

https://youtu.be/17ILEqTzUxM
Except every one of those videos was recorded at a tire shop.
My dad and my grandfather knew people killed or severely injured by exploding tires. All the people I know have stories about clean underwear and tire cages doing their jobs.

Sure, you can do it in the field - just take the right precautions first. (Keep a nice, safe distance away.)
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:25 PM   #24
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how big of a compressor do I need to run this 1" drive impact gun I bought? I'd like to have everything needed to service all systems on board the bus. Will it run off the brake tanks?
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:27 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMORGANSKOOL View Post
how big of a compressor do I need to run this 1" drive impact gun I bought? I'd like to have everything needed to service all systems on board the bus. Will it run off the brake tanks?
What do the specs call for?
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Old 05-15-2019, 06:45 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by CMORGANSKOOL View Post
how big of a compressor do I need to run this 1" drive impact gun I bought? I'd like to have everything needed to service all systems on board the bus. Will it run off the brake tanks?
Recommended pressure is 90PSI, most compressors can put that out. The issue will come in on how big of compressor you need to maintain 90PSI. With a small compressor you may only gets a few seconds bfore you have to stop and wait for the compressor to catch up.
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Old 05-15-2019, 09:54 PM   #27
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I found the official 22.5 tire procedure manual.
Iím going to follow these instructions as should you.
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Old 05-16-2019, 05:04 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMORGANSKOOL View Post
I found the official 22.5 tire procedure manual.
Iím going to follow these instructions as should you.
Thank you for posting the OSHA chart. It is a good description of the proceedure. I have a copy in my mobile tablet now.
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Old 05-16-2019, 10:51 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolly Roger bus 223 View Post
vaseline will make it go alot easier?
Vaseline is petroleum based not supposed to use for seating tires. The lube used in the tired shops are all vegetable based.
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Old 05-16-2019, 10:52 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cjgoertzen View Post
Vaseline is petroleum based not supposed to use for seating tires. The lube used in the tired shops are all vegetable based.

I use dish soap and water. Wet a sponge and give the tire bead a sponge bath.
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Old 05-16-2019, 11:00 AM   #31
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That will definitly work and ive done it on my own tires. Ive worked in a few tire shops. The lube they use is vegetable based. Heck ive even used ether to seat the beads. Is that right uhhhhh no😀. Changing big tires is a breeze would rather change the tires out on my bus than on my car.
As for that impact u will need a good supply of cfm 130psi means nothing if your only producing 5 cfm. I pulled the tires off my bus with my mac 1/2 inch drive but my compressor produces 15.5 cfm@170 psi.
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Old 05-16-2019, 01:05 PM   #32
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So I take it you haven't got the job done yet. Here are a few tips I learned last summer when I swapped around about a dozen tires.

Getting the wheel off the bus
Four feet of leverage works pretty well. I use a 3/4" breaker bar 24 inches long with a home-made adapter so that my 24 inch torque wrench can attach at the end of the breaker bar for a total 48" length. It's enough leverage to get the lug nuts off, and with a bit of math one can work out the torque wrench setting to achieve about 450 lb-ft on the nut when re-installing the wheels.

Draining the air
Remove the valve core and wait. Really, remove the core.. it'll make the difference between success and failure when re-seating the beads. It also makes a difference when breaking the beads.

Breaking the beads
Several of the beads I dealt with fell loose from the wheel on their own. For those that didn't I maneuvered the tire and wheel under the bus bumper, then used a 2x4 as a lever against the bus bumper with a small block to push down on the tire sidewall.

Getting the tire off the wheel (and on again)
Use tire lubricant generously. Place the wheel so the drop center is down on the floor. Use tire spoons to work the bead over the wheel. My spoons are 18" and this was generally adequate, but once in a while I had to use a piece of pipe for extra leverage on a spoon handle.

Seating the beads
Put the wheel onto a hub and spin a few lug nuts on. Use tire lube generously again. Remove the valve core and clip on an air supply. Air won't flow into the tire fast enough, even if your compressor is enormous, with the core still installed. If it's your lucky day you can finesse the wheel and tire to minimize air leakage and as pressure builds it'll seal up on its own. If that doesn't happen then push the tire so the inner sidewall is up against the back of the wheel. Inflate a bicycle inner tube just enough to give it form, lube it well, and stuff it into the gap between the outer tire sidewall and wheel. It'll reduce the air leakage enough for the bead to seat. (I kid you not; this works amazingly well.) It's very interactive; you have to be right there poking the tube in when it blows out and sometimes tugging the tube out when it gets pinched between the sidewall and the wheel. It does work, though, and IMHO is safer than alternative approaches involving flammable substances..

As soon as the tire starts holding air step far away, ie out of the blast zone, and wait for it to inflate. Don't forget to have the valve core and tool ready when you disconnect that clip-on air hose!
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Old 05-16-2019, 01:08 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
Draining the air
Remove the valve core and wait. Really, remove the core.. it'll make the difference between success and failure when re-seating the beads. It also makes a difference when breaking the beads.

Yes, yes and yes! I'm glad you mentioned this.
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Old 05-16-2019, 01:14 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
So I take it you haven't got the job done yet. Here are a few tips I learned last summer when I swapped around about a dozen tires.

Getting the wheel off the bus
Four feet of leverage works pretty well. I use a 3/4" breaker bar 24 inches long with a home-made adapter so that my 24 inch torque wrench can attach at the end of the breaker bar for a total 48" length. It's enough leverage to get the lug nuts off, and with a bit of math one can work out the torque wrench setting to achieve about 450 lb-ft on the nut when re-installing the wheels.

Draining the air
Remove the valve core and wait. Really, remove the core.. it'll make the difference between success and failure when re-seating the beads. It also makes a difference when breaking the beads.

Breaking the beads
Several of the beads I dealt with fell loose from the wheel on their own. For those that didn't I maneuvered the tire and wheel under the bus bumper, then used a 2x4 as a lever against the bus bumper with a small block to push down on the tire sidewall.

Getting the tire off the wheel (and on again)
Use tire lubricant generously. Place the wheel so the drop center is down on the floor. Use tire spoons to work the bead over the wheel. My spoons are 18" and this was generally adequate, but once in a while I had to use a piece of pipe for extra leverage on a spoon handle.

Seating the beads
Put the wheel onto a hub and spin a few lug nuts on. Use tire lube generously again. Remove the valve core and clip on an air supply. Air won't flow into the tire fast enough, even if your compressor is enormous, with the core still installed. If it's your lucky day you can finesse the wheel and tire to minimize air leakage and as pressure builds it'll seal up on its own. If that doesn't happen then push the tire so the inner sidewall is up against the back of the wheel. Inflate a bicycle inner tube just enough to give it form, lube it well, and stuff it into the gap between the outer tire sidewall and wheel. It'll reduce the air leakage enough for the bead to seat. (I kid you not; this works amazingly well.) It's very interactive; you have to be right there poking the tube in when it blows out and sometimes tugging the tube out when it gets pinched between the sidewall and the wheel. It does work, though, and IMHO is safer than alternative approaches involving flammable substances..

As soon as the tire starts holding air step far away, ie out of the blast zone, and wait for it to inflate. Don't forget to have the valve core and tool ready when you disconnect that clip-on air hose!
Agreed. Never thought of the bicycle tube method. When i worked at the tire shop if i was on a service call and disnt have the bead blaster we used whats called murphys. Its like a paste that would do the same thing to seat the bead. Ive always aired up th tires laying down though it seems to seat "true"or more concentric to the rim.
As for balancing idont bother with drives. I used 2 bags of balance beads on the steerings.
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Old 05-16-2019, 01:32 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
So I take it you haven't got the job done yet. Here are a few tips I learned last summer when I swapped around about a dozen tires.

Getting the wheel off the bus
Four feet of leverage works pretty well. I use a 3/4" breaker bar 24 inches long with a home-made adapter so that my 24 inch torque wrench can attach at the end of the breaker bar for a total 48" length. It's enough leverage to get the lug nuts off, and with a bit of math one can work out the torque wrench setting to achieve about 450 lb-ft on the nut when re-installing the wheels.

Draining the air
Remove the valve core and wait. Really, remove the core.. it'll make the difference between success and failure when re-seating the beads. It also makes a difference when breaking the beads.

Breaking the beads
Several of the beads I dealt with fell loose from the wheel on their own. For those that didn't I maneuvered the tire and wheel under the bus bumper, then used a 2x4 as a lever against the bus bumper with a small block to push down on the tire sidewall.

Getting the tire off the wheel (and on again)
Use tire lubricant generously. Place the wheel so the drop center is down on the floor. Use tire spoons to work the bead over the wheel. My spoons are 18" and this was generally adequate, but once in a while I had to use a piece of pipe for extra leverage on a spoon handle.

Seating the beads
Put the wheel onto a hub and spin a few lug nuts on. Use tire lube generously again. Remove the valve core and clip on an air supply. Air won't flow into the tire fast enough, even if your compressor is enormous, with the core still installed. If it's your lucky day you can finesse the wheel and tire to minimize air leakage and as pressure builds it'll seal up on its own. If that doesn't happen then push the tire so the inner sidewall is up against the back of the wheel. Inflate a bicycle inner tube just enough to give it form, lube it well, and stuff it into the gap between the outer tire sidewall and wheel. It'll reduce the air leakage enough for the bead to seat. (I kid you not; this works amazingly well.) It's very interactive; you have to be right there poking the tube in when it blows out and sometimes tugging the tube out when it gets pinched between the sidewall and the wheel. It does work, though, and IMHO is safer than alternative approaches involving flammable substances..

As soon as the tire starts holding air step far away, ie out of the blast zone, and wait for it to inflate. Don't forget to have the valve core and tool ready when you disconnect that clip-on air hose!
I like the bicycle tire idea - would have been a help when changing tires was part of my job when I was a youth, and even more when I worked at a tire recapping business - thanks for the tip - never know, I might need it some day or I can pass it on to someone that might need it
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Old 05-16-2019, 02:05 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cjgoertzen View Post
Agreed. Never thought of the bicycle tube method. When i worked at the tire shop if i was on a service call and disnt have the bead blaster we used whats called murphys. Its like a paste that would do the same thing to seat the bead. Ive always aired up th tires laying down though it seems to seat "true"or more concentric to the rim.
As for balancing idont bother with drives. I used 2 bags of balance beads on the steerings.
I think you're right that the beads will mount more true if it's done laying down. I only suggest putting the wheel onto a hub for the inflation because if the thing does explode, we know the wheel won't go flying if it's secured to the axle. The body of the bus provides some blast protection too. Sure it might really make a mess of the bus, but in my own system of values I'd rather have the bus be damaged than have loose parts going flying across the yard, shop, or whatever.


Truth be told, I suspect a person could get the seating started with the assembly lying flat on the ground for and then mount it up on the axle just as soon as it starts holding air.
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Old 05-16-2019, 02:56 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
I think you're right that the beads will mount more true if it's done laying down. I only suggest putting the wheel onto a hub for the inflation because if the thing does explode, we know the wheel won't go flying if it's secured to the axle. The body of the bus provides some blast protection too. Sure it might really make a mess of the bus, but in my own system of values I'd rather have the bus be damaged than have loose parts going flying across the yard, shop, or whatever.


Truth be told, I suspect a person could get the seating started with the assembly lying flat on the ground for and then mount it up on the axle just as soon as it starts holding air.
I mentioned before about seeing a road side tire repair done with a heavy chain looped ( in a figure 8 ) around a tire ready to inflate - that was done with the tire laying flat on the ground
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Old 05-16-2019, 03:03 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
I think you're right that the beads will mount more true if it's done laying down. I only suggest putting the wheel onto a hub for the inflation because if the thing does explode, we know the wheel won't go flying if it's secured to the axle. The body of the bus provides some blast protection too. Sure it might really make a mess of the bus, but in my own system of values I'd rather have the bus be damaged than have loose parts going flying across the yard, shop, or whatever.


Truth be told, I suspect a person could get the seating started with the assembly lying flat on the ground for and then mount it up on the axle just as soon as it starts holding air.
Yes most brands will pretty much take air right away. From my experience michelin and bfgoodrich were the best. But even to put 20lbs in and then finish it off bolted up is good.

I have had tires blow on me when i was working in the tire shop, thankgoodness none of them were split rims. We never used the cage for unimounts only for splitrims.

But with that being said now that i have children i use best practice of atleast using some chains and a long hose to air up.
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Old 05-18-2019, 10:52 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marceps View Post
Lug wrench, mineral spirits, two tire irons, core removal tool, and a torque wrench:



I'm with jazty and Seriousracer. You can do this.
Good video. This is how the tire service guys do it on the side of the road for trucks.
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Old 05-19-2019, 12:19 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CMORGANSKOOL View Post
Any advice on pulling and mounting new rubber myself? Got 4 new tires, two heavy duty truck tire irons, a 1" impact wrench a stem tool and some tire snot.
Watched a youtube video the other day. One scrawly little guy changed 4 ea wheels and tires on an old grey hound bus before I got bored with the video. HE USED a 1" impact wrench and 2 ea cheap harbor freight compressors in parallel to get the lug nuts off BUT broke the bead loose with a hammer and popped the old tires with 2 tie tools and installed the new ones the same way. To seat the beads he placed the tires on the ground and used the bus as a shield. So it can be done without an issue except bruises and sweat. The worker in the video was a professional tire man.

My tires will go to the tire shop unless there is no other way.
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