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Old 09-24-2020, 06:18 PM   #21
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I would think there isn't a huge cost savings to having it done professionally? I had a 240 sq ft addition foamed attic to walls at 6" depth for $1200. Batt insulation was $800. Wondering if the same applies to having them do a bare framed bus?

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Old 09-24-2020, 09:25 PM   #22
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I would think there isn't a huge cost savings to having it done professionally? I had a 240 sq ft addition foamed attic to walls at 6" depth for $1200. Batt insulation was $800. Wondering if the same applies to having them do a bare framed bus?
240 x 6 is 1440 board-feet, and the DIY kits are typically 600-650 board-feet for $700-$750, so it sounds like you got an excellent deal. You might be able to swing an even better deal if you offer to drive the bus to wherever they are and use leftover stuff from another job (which I've heard happens sometimes).
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Old 09-24-2020, 09:58 PM   #23
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You can use ridged foam to help the spray go a little further, cut the ridged a little short so you can get the spray down in the lower wall cavities and all around. Spray over the ridged to get a good seal and remember to glue the ridged on with something like PL300 and brace it overnight so it doesn't get displaced by the spray.
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Old 09-24-2020, 10:10 PM   #24
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Be sure to follow the instructions on the spray foam like your life depends on it, the last thing you want is to waste the costly foam and worse, cleaning up a sticky mess from your whole bus will be a nightmare.
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Old 09-24-2020, 10:39 PM   #25
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You can use ridged foam to help the spray go a little further, cut the ridged a little short so you can get the spray down in the lower wall cavities and all around. Spray over the ridged to get a good seal and remember to glue the ridged on with something like PL300 and brace it overnight so it doesn't get displaced by the spray.
Good luckAttachment 49276
Very cool, I was thinking about doing something like this way back when. Neat to see that it actually would work.
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Old 10-01-2020, 06:40 PM   #26
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I actually ended up finding a couple pros in my area (Northern Colorado) who are *cheaper* than doing it myself! So I will definitely be going professional. Interestingly, they all (every single one), said that they generally do not recommend flush fills. They basically said that it's possible, and it's not like it is harmful, but it is a ton of extra work for almost no extra insulation. The flush fill requires overspraying, and then cutting down, so it's more foam and more time than spraying just a 1/4 inch or 1/2 inch short of the top of the studs. They also said that at 2-2.25 inches my dew points will be in the middle of the foam (which is good), so it should be just fine. I get that it would be better to have it flush filled, but I'm not gonna argue with the pros and their $650-$700 quotes!

I did offer to do the prep and clean-up though*
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Old 10-01-2020, 06:51 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by bachataBus View Post
I actually ended up finding a couple pros in my area (Northern Colorado) who are *cheaper* than doing it myself! So I will definitely be going professional. Interestingly, they all (every single one), said that they generally do not recommend flush fills. They basically said that it's possible, and it's not like it is harmful, but it is a ton of extra work for almost no extra insulation. The flush fill requires overspraying, and then cutting down, so it's more foam and more time than spraying just a 1/4 inch or 1/2 inch short of the top of the studs. They also said that at 2-2.25 inches my dew points will be in the middle of the foam (which is good), so it should be just fine. I get that it would be better to have it flush filled, but I'm not gonna argue with the pros and their $650-$700 quotes!

I did offer to do the prep and clean-up though*
This is very helpful information. Keep us posted on your progress.
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Old 12-12-2020, 03:37 PM   #28
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Air gaps are not the insulation. The foam is the insulation. You do not want any air gaps at all.
This may seem like such a stupid question, but, can someone define "air gap"?

It seems different people think this means different things. I was interpreting "air gap" as "allowing air to flow in the space behind the finished wall between that finished wall and the metal wall of the bus". That seems important, crucial even.

So Cheese_Wagon, per your comment about mold, I thought, if wanting to prevent mold and water damage, a house needs to "breath". Air tight buildings are leading to water damage. I get that leaving space for the "wall to breath" means that the insulation factor wont be as good, but the space needs space - to dry out.

Thoughts?
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Old 12-12-2020, 06:12 PM   #29
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This may seem like such a stupid question, but, can someone define "air gap"?

It seems different people think this means different things. I was interpreting "air gap" as "allowing air to flow in the space behind the finished wall between that finished wall and the metal wall of the bus". That seems important, crucial even.
Yeah, I've seen it used in all sorts of ways. One meaning applies to radiant barriers - something like the foil on R-Max board needs to have an air gap of at least 1" on the side facing the heat source in order to have any insulating effect.

I generally ask people to clarify what they mean exactly when they use the expression.
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