Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-25-2018, 01:00 PM   #21
Bus Geek
 
brokedown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Weeki Wachee, FL
Posts: 3,028
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: Cummins 5.9
Rated Cap: 72
I started my short bus in 8 degree weather once. The glow light was on for a LONG time. I actually made a video of it at 20 degrees.

Remember that in cold weather your batteries lose their strength, so you've got a vehicle that's harder to start combined with a battery that's not giving you its A game.

__________________
Keep up with us and our build!
Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter
brokedown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2018, 03:26 PM   #22
Skoolie
 
Trail Fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: SE WI
Posts: 118
Year: 2002
Coachwork: American Transportation Corp
Chassis: International 3000
Engine: International T 444E
Rated Cap: 71 pass., 12 window
This is all REALLY great information!! You are all so helpful! TY!
Trail Fairy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2018, 04:45 PM   #23
Bus Nut
 
Skunky Bus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Council Bluffs, Iowa
Posts: 422
Year: 1976
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: Dodge S-600
Engine: 360 V8
Rated Cap: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
Here you can see a piece of the cheap insulation typically found in a bus. Also see the first one of my babies to check out her new home away from home.
Aww, that cat's adorable! IMO "Home without animals" is a contradiction in terms.
Skunky Bus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2018, 05:09 PM   #24
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 2
To answer your question about if busses are insulated. No, they are not insulated very well. It would pay to gut the bus and insulated it. When I gutted my bus, there were gaps where there was no insulation. When they build school busses they just throw a little bit of insulation in the area between the ribs and most of the time it doesn't even reach from rib to rib. But they can claim it's insulated if there is insulation in it. If you are in the northern area, you really need to insulate it.
CDennis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2018, 07:25 PM   #25
Bus Crazy
 
milkmania's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Oklahoma aka "God's blind spot"
Posts: 2,446
Year: 1989
Coachwork: 1853FC International/Navistar
Chassis: 35' Retired Air Force Ambulance
Engine: DT466, MT643
Rated Cap: 6 souls and a driver
My bus is technically insulated in the ceiling from the factory ...
I’d say 1” of insulation has the same R-Value as a nest of spiders

2nd. picture, June 15th @ 5:30pm
Attached Thumbnails
F98F0200-49FA-41C3-A38A-18F166247A40.jpeg   D30775A3-0B34-44A7-89C7-5C12C8D6F340.jpg  
milkmania is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2018, 08:01 PM   #26
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Lynchburg, VA
Posts: 39
Year: 2001
Coachwork: Mid Bus, Inc Ohio
Chassis: GMC Savanna 3500
Engine: 5.7 Vortec, GMC
Rated Cap: 22
If you fill the gap between your roof and ceiling with spray foam and bolt the metal back to the ribs, you've wasted a lot of money. The ribs were how the ceiling was getting hot before and will be how they're getting hot after. You need a thermal break to separate the roof from the ceiling, just stuffing foam in between doesn't do much.[/QUOTE]

You sound like you may be a builder or in the construction trade. I, being a BUILDER, have read lots of info about thermal breaks in house construction. Makes sense to me.
Hammerhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2018, 08:12 PM   #27
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Owasso, OK
Posts: 2,627
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner MVP ER
Engine: Cummins 6CTA8.3 Mechanical MD3060
Rated Cap: 46 Coach Seats, 40 foot
Yes, some buses are very well insulated from the factory.

Usually, they are special-purpose buses. Typically, Bloodmobiles, BookMobiles and Wanderlodges came with spray foam or an equivalent.

Many of them have spray foam that was applied to the underside of the body before it was attached to the frame.
__________________
Steve Bracken

Build Thread
Twigg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2018, 08:30 PM   #28
Bus Crazy
 
milkmania's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Oklahoma aka "God's blind spot"
Posts: 2,446
Year: 1989
Coachwork: 1853FC International/Navistar
Chassis: 35' Retired Air Force Ambulance
Engine: DT466, MT643
Rated Cap: 6 souls and a driver
Mine was purpose built as an ambulance and is very poorly insulated...
but, that being said... it would not be for continued long term use and it was built with an additional Mitsubishi L3e Diesel engine running two separate R-12 a/c compressors and ported ductwork running length of bus on both sides.

Iím sure during its early years of operation, it had absolutely no problem circumventing any heat infiltration... Very beefy construction, which means deep pockets to restore! (Plus R-12 system)But hey, it was for the Air Force!
Attached Thumbnails
0D3E58EC-0E7B-450B-B45F-0194FC35B422.jpg   8456ED31-527B-480A-A8F3-3C8DF86C6834.jpeg   A38D33A8-F764-4A35-8EFD-81E8B42EDC46.png  
__________________
I once complained I had no shoes....
Until I met a man with no feet
milkmania is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2018, 05:41 AM   #29
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 15
Can you explain a walkin cooler or refridge then please??
ddcam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2018, 08:06 AM   #30
Bus Geek
 
brokedown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Weeki Wachee, FL
Posts: 3,028
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: Cummins 5.9
Rated Cap: 72
That pony setup is sexy.
__________________
Keep up with us and our build!
Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter
brokedown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2018, 09:20 AM   #31
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trail Fairy View Post
Hi!
Got my school bus from a large school bus company in southeastern Wisconsin. When we tap on the walls and ceiling, they don't sound hollow? (Without ripping them apart to find out due to time restraints). Do buses in the northern states already come slightly insulated? (In our school district we still have outdoor recess at school unless temps drop below freezing. I believe school is cancelled at -20F with wind chill. So kids are standing at bus stops in really cold weather.)
Thanks!

I spent 3 years on the road in a touring rock band in Ontario Canada in temperatures from -30 F to +90 F. Our skoolie had bunks and only marginal insulation but we made out fine. The biggest heat loss factor in a skoolie is the windows. You can insulate everything else to the max, but if you don't have a way of insulating windows you are missing the biggest source of heat loss on a bus.
capnron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2018, 09:49 AM   #32
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: colorado
Posts: 29
Year: 2002
Engine: chevy
Insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptSquid View Post
I've weathered THREE Montana winters with only 1" added insulation on the walls.
~~~What do you do in the hot summers to keep your self and 2 lap dogs cool?****I don't have A/C dang it!
Shawna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2018, 08:21 AM   #33
Bus Geek
 
Brewerbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Essex, MD
Posts: 3,738
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: Blue Bird TC RE 3904, Flat Nose, 40', 277" wh base
Engine: 8.3L Cummins ISC 260hp, MT643, 4.44 rear
Rated Cap: 84 pax or 1 RV; 33,000lbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twigg View Post
Many of them have spray foam that was applied to the underside of the body before it was attached to the frame.
That would have been an excellent find. Oh well.


Quote:
Originally Posted by capnron View Post
I spent 3 years on the road in a touring rock band in Ontario Canada in temperatures from -30 F to +90 F.
90F isn't bad as long as it's also <40% humidity. The SE US is known for equal temps and humidity. I do NOT want to try that in a skoolie; insulated or otherwise. A motorcoach with the AC system would be fine but only until I leave the area. I'm too old for that any more (FL native).


Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawna View Post
~~~What do you do in the hot summers to keep your self and 2 lap dogs cool?****I don't have A/C dang it!
Go gator fishing. While swimming the dogs will entertain the alligators.


P.S. Dogs should be ground dwellers. They don't belong on couches or laps.
P.S.S. I'm not having much luck convincing my gf of that with her dogs either.
Brewerbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2018, 12:11 PM   #34
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Michigan
Posts: 32
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: 3800
Engine: DT466E
Rated Cap: 42
I have seen a few different types of buses as I have driven a few years for a local public school. Most of them up here in MI seem to have the insulation looking stuff between a sheet steel top and a perforated steel ceiling. I think it is just there for sound deadening as those buses soak up most chatter as it seems to go through the perforated ceiling and get muffled, like the old glass pack mufflers. I have driven a couple buses that have a sheet steel ceiling without the perforations and they carry sound so well, you can hear what kids are saying in the back seat, which often is TMI. It is not needed to keep kids warm in the winter as the buses have massive overkill designed into the heater cores and even on -20F days, you can't run at max heat all the time if the heaters are clean and not plugged up from dust and hair and candy wrappers. Kids nowadays are likely to get on the bus wearing shorts and flip flops in the dead of winter, so I usually kept the bus in the 60s to 70s inside with no problems except everyone's glasses fogging up when they got on. And even with the white roofs, they get terribly hot inside those last few weeks of school before summer break.
siloguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2018, 07:56 PM   #35
Bus Nut
 
Skunky Bus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Council Bluffs, Iowa
Posts: 422
Year: 1976
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: Dodge S-600
Engine: 360 V8
Rated Cap: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by siloguy View Post
I have seen a few different types of buses as I have buses have massive overkill designed into the heater cores and even on -20F days, you can't run at max heat all the time if the heaters are clean and not plugged up ...
... And even with the white roofs, they get terribly hot inside those last few weeks of school before summer break.
Much agreed! The company I work for has propane powered Blue Birds and diesel Internationals (all conventional). Even in the diesels, which take much longer to warm up, once at operating temperature, the heaters feel like they'll melt your shoes.

As for summer, the only relief is to open up all the windows; at best it's like being in the shade.
Skunky Bus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2018, 08:04 PM   #36
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: colorado
Posts: 29
Year: 2002
Engine: chevy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewerbob View Post
That would have been an excellent find. Oh well.


90F isn't bad as long as it's also <40% humidity. The SE US is known for equal temps and humidity. I do NOT want to try that in a skoolie; insulated or otherwise. A motorcoach with the AC system would be fine but only until I leave the area. I'm too old for that any more (FL native).


Go gator fishing. While swimming the dogs will entertain the alligators.


P.S. Dogs should be ground dwellers. They don't belong on couches or laps.
P.S.S. I'm not having much luck convincing my gf of that with her dogs either.
Well I was kind of thinking that you had to be spiritually evolved to understand the concept of a lap dog and the purpose that they fulfill here on Earth. Apparently your girlfriend is evolved this website is not intended to say mean things to people about their dogs. my dogs are my family. They are not alligator bait.
Shawna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2018, 08:25 AM   #37
Bus Geek
 
Brewerbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Essex, MD
Posts: 3,738
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: Blue Bird TC RE 3904, Flat Nose, 40', 277" wh base
Engine: 8.3L Cummins ISC 260hp, MT643, 4.44 rear
Rated Cap: 84 pax or 1 RV; 33,000lbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawna View Post
my dogs are my family. They are not alligator bait.
Some of my family would make good gator bait too. Tho that would be cruel to the gator. I like my fish; he's the least trouble of them all. Doesn't want to go for a walk, only peed on the carpet once and that's because the cat scared him, doesn't jump on my lap, doesn't shed on the couch, He's a good fish.
Brewerbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2018, 03:08 PM   #38
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 7
Insulating over the metal skin...Good Idea or Bad?

Back on-topic....

Other than the obvious consideration of losing precious space within the confines of the bus...is there any other factor(s) that would make it unacceptable to simply frame out new walls to insulate the sides of a typical bus?

Would it be advisable to have a vapor barrier up against the steel inner wall surfaces to retard moisture (condensation) from forming and thereby prevent mold etc? I'm thinking that a self-stick membrane could be installed up to the windows and down to where it overlaps the floor, providing a barrier film with few protrusions (Wiring, mostly) that could in turn be sealed.

Still figuring that I'll need / want to insulate the ceiling...

Also figuring that I'll be removing the factory flooring, filling (weld and / or foam) holes in the floor, repairing any surface rust, etc...then installing a similar barrier layer under rigid foam insulation and a plywood sub-floor.

Opinions on this?
Cheddarhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-2018, 04:48 PM   #39
Bus Nut
 
Whatthefak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Wisconsin N.E.
Posts: 412
Year: 2000
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Thomas
Engine: 5.9
Rated Cap: 72
I found my bus has nice fluffy white stuff, not fiberglass more like poly pillow stuffing. It's all pretty clean and nice.

Any thoughts on laying one inch foam board over the top? It seems to work well the roof skin is hot the stuffing is not
Whatthefak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2018, 03:02 AM   #40
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whatthefak View Post
Any thoughts on laying one inch foam board over the top? It seems to work well the roof skin is hot the stuffing is not
Foam board is meant to go inside a wall, not outside, and wouldn't be terribly durable. But you are on the right track.

While I don't have a bus... I have a Uhaul converted to a race car hauler that never quite made it to an RV/toyhauler (so it's kind of similar). But the aluminum roof would hit 140F+ on the inside on a 85F day. Foam blocks (or spray foam) and an inner roof just create a heat sandwich, but applying an elastomeric coating on the outside (I used Koolseal) reduced the inside skin temp to ~ambient air temp. It will scrape off on low hanging trees, but it is still there many years later (installed 2009) sitting in the sun and through many winters, as seen in the image from Google below.
Attached Thumbnails
Uhaul Google Earth.png  
Davard is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cold weather, insulation

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.