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Old 09-30-2020, 02:26 PM   #1
Almost There
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Ohio
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Year: 2003
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American
Engine: Cummins 8.3
Can someone tell me why this might be a bad idea?

I was in my engine compartment and saw all the room i had to work with and started questioning the design choice of why bluebird choose to place the air intake through the cabin.

What reason should i not modify this up fit in the engine compartment and gain the extra space in the bedroom up above?

If it's particulate from the road or some reason similar i could screen the opening in the engine bay. I just can't understand why it goes up so high.

(Ignore the quick and sloppy paint job, that was to get us road legal)20200930_140207.jpg20200930_140225.jpg20200930_140239.jpg
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Old 09-30-2020, 02:44 PM   #2
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It would greatly increase the air intake charge temperature and hurt performance, also increases the possibility of rainwater or standing water getting through the filter while driving. I wouldn't do it.

In a nutshell, diesels are largely turbocharged, and turbocharged engines generally perform better with cool intake air. But putting the air filter / intake closer to the ground will increase the possibility of drawing water in through the filter, which kills a diesel catastrophically, and quickly at that.

Paintjob doesn't look that bad to be honest. Most people just roller-brush or spray can anyway. At least it's not conversion blue... LOL
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Old 09-30-2020, 02:50 PM   #3
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Year: 1999
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Mine is the same way only it goes up into the passenger compartment on the drivers side. I get why it's so high on that side, the radiator is on that side as wall. I plan on re-routing mine to the passengers side and keeping it at the top of the engine bay and out of the passenger compartment. I see absolutely no reason to get it up that high. As it will sit, it's already about 4 feet higher than the inlet on my car, so I don't think the argument of fewer particulates getting in at the higher level is a valid argument. A good quality filter serviced regularly will take care of any additional dust that might be floating around 3 feet lower in elevation.
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Old 09-30-2020, 04:02 PM   #4
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I also have a high air intake - engines need cool dust-free air, and without water if it's raining. For serious off-road or dirt-road use, look at how Australians deal with intake air; even some of their buses have roof-high air inlets, and all of their road train trucks have it high as standard. If you're driving thousands of miles in bulldust, there's no other way to do it.

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Old 09-30-2020, 04:55 PM   #5
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The only thing I'll be driving thousands of miles on is pavement. Suckin' air from 5 feet off the pavement will be just as cool and dry as suckin' air from 7 feet off the pavement. I haven't looked very close at a front engine bus, but I don't think they are suckin' air from up high in the body and they seem to do just fine. If anything, they would be much more likely to pull water in from the 18 wheeler in front of them creating a wall of water spray on a rainy afternoon than I will pulling air in from the passenger side of the bus.

The more I think about it, the less worried I am. On a two lane road on a rainy afternoon, every big truck that goes by is stirring up enough road spray that if any water is going to be pulled in, that is where it will be the worst. If I am pulling from the passenger side, there is almost zero water spray in that situation. On a 4 lane I'll be in the right lane, so very little spray in that situation as well.
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Old 09-30-2020, 04:55 PM   #6
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Something most folks don't realize about low-situated air filters is that they tend to get soaked with rainwater in a storm. Lots of 'tuner' import folks have this problem with their $300 cold-air intakes, which then lead to MAF codes and general problems with power and driveability. When they give up trying to figure it out, they go to a real mechanic, who pulls the sopping wet conical air filter from beneath the radiator support and says, "There's your problem, right there!" True story, seen it happen. And the last thing you want with a diesel is to suck excessive moisture through the air filter.

Also, if OP is thinking what I think they're thinking, this will inhibit heat dissipation from the engine compartment, something you don't want to do on an RE configuration.
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Old 09-30-2020, 05:39 PM   #7
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water is as stated above your enemy. it will freeze in the air cleaner housing and kill your engine. as to why its high watch the water spray off the back tires of any truck then imagine using that air for your engine.
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Old 10-01-2020, 08:50 AM   #8
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I have this same problem on my Amtran RE. I will likely leave the intake where it is at but decrease the protrusion into the cabin as much as possible. The Amtran buses have the same compartment on both sides even with the radiator being mounted rear center.
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Old 10-01-2020, 08:57 AM   #9
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there is a difference between air at 5 feet vs 7 feet esp whe nyou suck it from outside vs in the engine bay..



even the OLD coaches and fishbowls suck the intake air from up high..



im NOT a fan of people destroying their engine air intake just for a little aesthetics or 2 inches of extra interior space...



turbo engines like cooler air and the harder you ram the air into the intake the more boost you get, lower EGT, potentially better fuel burn quality..
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Old 10-01-2020, 09:05 AM   #10
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If anything I would go higher!
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