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Old 06-19-2020, 08:37 AM   #21
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try to stop the water before it gets to the inside lip as if it stays in the wall it will not only rust but the freezing water will deform your window/frame. that will lead to worse leaks. try to stop the water on the outside not the inside
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Old 06-19-2020, 09:24 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Adventuretrips1221 View Post
I am thinking about welding the gaps shut to fix the window seal leaks. This is my third round trying to get my windows properly sealed and I am on the edge of madness. I have sanded and cleaned the window frames on both previous attempts and used 3M Dyntron Auto Seam Sealer but the windows are still leaking through the bottom corners of the windows and through the bus seams in some areas.

I want to know if anyone has actually gone through with welding the gaps on each of the windows instead. I intend to use flex seal and butyl tape as well but it seems to me that welding these gasps shut will be the solution to the leaks. If anyone has gone the welding route please let me know the outcome. PLEASE HELP!
I don't believe seam sealer, or butyl tape have any reason to be anywhere near your windows. Auto glass shops use polyurethane sealant to set car windshields. Polyurethane can be purchased from any big box store for no more than the price of any other caulking. A friend of mine owns an auto glass shop and has re sealed many buses for the school district and has completed 4 skoolie's in the past for himself so I'll trust his advice. I've just completed removal and re seal on half my bus windows and first hose test shows no leaks.
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Old 06-19-2020, 10:27 AM   #23
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What he said.
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Old 06-19-2020, 11:02 AM   #24
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Your windows are aluminum, no? It would be a tough order to weld them to the steel ribs.

A number of my windows leaked (and are still leaking) in this manner. The source (in my case) is the seam between the bottom part of the window's outer frame and the two side parts. These pieces are only pressed together, so if this gap opens up even a tiny bit, it will allow in substantial water (when I had my windows out and put a hose on this part, water sprayed through into what would be the inside of my bus when mounted). The fix is to seal the outside of the window sill, in the hard-to-access corners that the moveable pane slides down into. I used my pinky to spread the seam sealer here, but it has not adhered very well and I need to redo my sills with a small craft brush.
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Old 06-19-2020, 11:08 AM   #25
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Your windows are aluminum, no? It would be a tough order to weld them to the steel ribs.

A number of my windows leaked (and are still leaking) in this manner. The source (in my case) is the seam between the bottom part of the window's outer frame and the two side parts. These pieces are only pressed together, so if this gap opens up even a tiny bit, it will allow in substantial water (when I had my windows out and put a hose on this part, water sprayed through into what would be the inside of my bus when mounted). The fix is to seal the outside of the window sill, in the hard-to-access corners that the moveable pane slides down into. I used my pinky to spread the seam sealer here, but it has not adhered very well and I need to redo my sills with a small craft brush.
Yup, more and more I'm thinking a BIG bead of spooge on the outside of the glass and the aluminum will be the way to go. Not even bother with removing the windows --just seal the outside with a clear spooge.
One day the inside of my bus will be pretty -- the outside will still be scrapping tree branches...
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Old 06-21-2020, 08:15 PM   #26
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I don't believe seam sealer, or butyl tape have any reason to be anywhere near your windows. Auto glass shops use polyurethane sealant to set car windshields. Polyurethane can be purchased from any big box store for no more than the price of any other caulking. A friend of mine owns an auto glass shop and has re sealed many buses for the school district and has completed 4 skoolie's in the past for himself so I'll trust his advice. I've just completed removal and re seal on half my bus windows and first hose test shows no leaks.
Do you by chance recall the brand of polyurethane you used for yours? I just got done cleaning all the seam sealers off the frame and windows and I am getting ready to put the windows back and seal them again. I appreciate the feedback.
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Old 06-21-2020, 09:28 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Adventuretrips1221 View Post
Do you by chance recall the brand of polyurethane you used for yours? I just got done cleaning all the seam sealers off the frame and windows and I am getting ready to put the windows back and seal them again. I appreciate the feedback.
image.jpg
There you go!
Right out of the paint department at Home Depot.
Polyurethane has great flexibility, adhesion and is paintable.
I just pulled and prepped my next six windows this afternoon, the reason I do six at a time is its not too overwhelming like having them all out at one time and you should be able to set 5-6 windows on one tube of sealant. The tubes do not last very long once they've been opened.
Good luck with your work
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Old 06-21-2020, 10:52 PM   #28
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Your windows are aluminum, no? It would be a tough order to weld them to the steel ribs.

A number of my windows leaked (and are still leaking) in this manner. The source (in my case) is the seam between the bottom part of the window's outer frame and the two side parts. These pieces are only pressed together, so if this gap opens up even a tiny bit, it will allow in substantial water (when I had my windows out and put a hose on this part, water sprayed through into what would be the inside of my bus when mounted). The fix is to seal the outside of the window sill, in the hard-to-access corners that the moveable pane slides down into. I used my pinky to spread the seam sealer here, but it has not adhered very well and I need to redo my sills with a small craft brush.
I am personally not a welder, I would have to get a professional to do the work. I am asking because it seems to make so much sense to weld those gaps on the bottom corners with an additional piece of metal on each side as a permanent solution to any leaks. Then follow with treating the corners to avoid rust after the weld, put the windows back, seal the outside of the windows with something that works and move on to the next project. I just haven't found anyone that has done it that way and I'm wondering if there would be any drawbacks besides having to pay a welder.
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Old 06-21-2020, 10:54 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Oscar1 View Post
Attachment 45874
There you go!
Right out of the paint department at Home Depot.
Polyurethane has great flexibility, adhesion and is paintable.
I just pulled and prepped my next six windows this afternoon, the reason I do six at a time is its not too overwhelming like having them all out at one time and you should be able to set 5-6 windows on one tube of sealant. The tubes do not last very long once they've been opened.
Good luck with your work
Cheers
Thank you 👏
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Old 06-21-2020, 11:12 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Adventuretrips1221 View Post
I am personally not a welder, I would have to get a professional to do the work. I am asking because it seems to make so much sense to weld those gaps on the bottom corners with an additional piece of metal on each side as a permanent solution to any leaks. Then follow with treating the corners to avoid rust after the weld, put the windows back, seal the outside of the windows with something that works and move on to the next project. I just haven't found anyone that has done it that way and I'm wondering if there would be any drawbacks besides having to pay a welder.
I also am not a welder but I do own several machines and am capable with them. even with that its not something I would consider doing right now. That's a ton of extra work (24 windows) I'm comfortable with the prep I'm doing now to reseal them, hope that doesn't change a year from now. Can't imagine what a welder would charge.
Any downside? Other than cost? I don't think so.
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Old 06-22-2020, 03:10 PM   #31
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I also am not a welder but I do own several machines and am capable with them. even with that its not something I would consider doing right now. That's a ton of extra work (24 windows) I'm comfortable with the prep I'm doing now to reseal them, hope that doesn't change a year from now. Can't imagine what a welder would charge.
Any downside? Other than cost? I don't think so.
Got it, I having a pro looking at it this week for a quote. I'm sure the cost will make me stop asking the question lol. I appreciate the feedback though. Either way the leaks shall be fixed, I have to get on the road soon!
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Old 06-22-2020, 04:00 PM   #32
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gap.png

The red lines here show where you want to have a watertight seal. If I interpret you correctly, the green area is what you want to weld something over. But the only way water could get to here is if the water is getting past the red line seal (or if water is going through the window unit). If you have water getting past your window to the inside like this, you're still going to have a problem whether or not you close up that gap.
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