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Old 08-27-2018, 04:59 PM   #1
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Floor Help for BumbleBus

Hello,

My father and I recently began a buildout of a Ford E-350 Shuttle Bus that is currently being called the "BumbleBus". He recommended leaving the original flooring(rubber top, plywood underneath) and build new floor on top of that HOWEVER I couldn't turn a blind eye to what's underneath. And I'm impulsive..

After pulling up the rubber I got to the plywood which was 2 layers on top of the base metal. I have 2 questions and was hoping someone, anyone can help:

1. Should I remove the layers of plywood to get to the base metal?(rust?) I'm in the process of removing those "metal floor things"(in pic). Each one fit snug in the top layer of plywood and drilled through the next layer of plywood and base metal all the way to the outside(will need to be sealed). Would be easiest to sand the ply however I don't mind removing the ply if I have to.

2. Instead of using the plastic casings that fit on top of the tire casings(as seen in photos) can I apply something to the metal that serves as a more attractive temperature barrier? This would be post getting rid of the rust.

Thanks to all who read. Looking forward to journey.
Beep beep,
Tyler

P.S. I'm a NOOB at pictures. I'll update soon so they're not sideways
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Old 08-27-2018, 05:14 PM   #2
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Most water that gets in will heed gravity and end up dispersed across the floor. It would be wise as long as you're this far in to deconstruction to address the rust under the plywood.

Insulation on the wheel humps can be sprayed on or layered in rigid board to the desired thickness.
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Old 08-27-2018, 05:19 PM   #3
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Remove everything down to bare metal to clean it and rust treat it. That way you will be able to see if everything is good with the metal floor because mine was looking good on the surface and when I removed the ply wood I found the my whole floor is gone which was not visible from under the bus (( ... advice I used a long prybar to lift the plywood and the stuck a carjack under and pumped it up that way is very easy.
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Old 08-27-2018, 07:24 PM   #4
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Thanks for the advice @o1marc and @thristov ! The rust will be addressed. That's unfortunate @thristov I hope you were able to find a solution

Edit: Also to anyone in this thread how do you tag people so they see your reply
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Old 08-27-2018, 09:17 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OneFlyTree View Post
Hello,

My father and I recently began a buildout of a Ford E-350 Shuttle Bus that is currently being called the "BumbleBus". He recommended leaving the original flooring(rubber top, plywood underneath) and build new floor on top of that HOWEVER I couldn't turn a blind eye to what's underneath. And I'm impulsive..

After pulling up the rubber I got to the plywood which was 2 layers on top of the base metal. I have 2 questions and was hoping someone, anyone can help:

1. Should I remove the layers of plywood to get to the base metal?(rust?) I'm in the process of removing those "metal floor things"(in pic). Each one fit snug in the top layer of plywood and drilled through the next layer of plywood and base metal all the way to the outside(will need to be sealed). Would be easiest to sand the ply however I don't mind removing the ply if I have to.

2. Instead of using the plastic casings that fit on top of the tire casings(as seen in photos) can I apply something to the metal that serves as a more attractive temperature barrier? This would be post getting rid of the rust.

Thanks to all who read. Looking forward to journey.
Beep beep,
Tyler

P.S. I'm a NOOB at pictures. I'll update soon so they're not sideways

1: Yes pull up the plywood.. most of us have found a scary amount of rust under our seemingly good floors.
2: I had an out of the box solution to insulation see this thread
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f10/in...ons-23588.html




Also checkout my two most recent Youtube videos (link below) for more on the Lizard Skin product we used.



Good luck to you and the project!
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Serenity Bus Project: OUR NEW EBOOK. ITS A HOW-TO GUIDE. PLEASE CHECK IT OUT! --> https://www.serenitybusproject.com/store/p1/So-Your-Dream-Of-Owning-A-Skoolie.html
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Old 08-28-2018, 12:24 AM   #6
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Metal floors in the back of a shuttle? Odd.. most I've seen are just plywood over square tube framing.


If there is sheet metal under the plywood.. I'd pull it up. If not, I'd check the plywood over for soft spots and insulate over it.
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