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Old 02-16-2018, 11:07 AM   #61
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I haven't driven around yet but I used roxul comfortboard 80 in my ceiling. 1.5" r6. I cut 6 inch strips and squeezed it in there tightly and it's physically difficult to get out so I have no worries about it falling down, even without the ceiling installed. Ceiling is 1/4" cedar nailed into furring strips screwed to the ribs mostly. (Low ceiling, no roof raise so I made it high and tight!). Seems to be great, makes a huge difference in bus warmth in the cold, and is seemingly less toxic than anything else I can find, no Voc's, less petrochemicals etc... I used roxul fluffy insulation in my walls for the same reasons and I think it's great compared to the fiberglass that was there.

I used the same 1.5" roxul under my subfloor too. We'll see how it holds up but I have zero concerns thus far.

You make some interesting points about insulating with a natural material. Also this answers the question about this type of insulation very well. Thank you.

In about 30 years we can figure out which insulation lasts longer.

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Old 02-16-2018, 11:28 AM   #62
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I have no doubt that other things will last longer, but if I'm still in this bus in 30 years I'll worry about it then!
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Old 02-16-2018, 02:18 PM   #63
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Allright, let's make it a date. In 30 years we'll pull our insulation and decide which one worked the best.

Any insulation is fine as long as it stays dry. I prefer closed cell in spray foam or rigid as it can not hold water since it has no fibers. I'm not ragging on your choice of insulation. I'm happy to see it because we have been asking that very question here for some time now. Change is a slow process. I hope it works well because that's just one more choice available to us. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 02-16-2018, 04:36 PM   #64
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I have Roxul for my walls and floor insulation - made a 2x4 grid on floor, put it in each section then added plywood on top. I will also be adding it to the roof between ceiling and styrofoam board. It is easy to cut with a saw blade, and I have even split it in half to fit in the wall area. I like that it is easy to work with, nontoxic, won't grow mold, fire retardant. I love it.
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Old 02-16-2018, 07:32 PM   #65
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Has anyone seen/used this 3in1 underlayment these guys talk about? I like the idea...


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Old 02-16-2018, 07:42 PM   #66
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I haven't watched the video yet, but that looks like R-Tech insulation.

R-Tech is expanded polystyrene, and although R-Max is rather more expensive, it's a much better choice.
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Old 02-16-2018, 07:44 PM   #67
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I was thinking the underlayment they talk about...
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Old 02-16-2018, 07:58 PM   #68
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I was thinking the underlayment they talk about...
lol ... I'll watch the video
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Old 02-16-2018, 08:27 PM   #69
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It looked like they were using spray can adhesive to glue foam carpet padding to the back of the panels.
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Old 02-16-2018, 08:37 PM   #70
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It looked like they were using spray can adhesive to glue foam carpet padding to the back of the panels.
Its a 3ply thing, a moisture barrier, some insulation and it helps with sound deadening...idk. They describe it at the 2:00 mark...
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Old 02-16-2018, 11:47 PM   #71
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Wonderful conversation! You have all convinced me to stick with my plan to use foam board insulation. I find all this discussion fascinating, especially since insulating is my next step. I have been kicking myself all winter that I was not winterized.
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Old 02-17-2018, 07:39 AM   #72
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If you use the rigid foam with the radiant barrier on it, doesnt that "shiny side" go out to the metal of the bus?
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Old 02-17-2018, 11:16 AM   #73
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Its a 3ply thing, a moisture barrier, some insulation and it helps with sound deadening...idk. They describe it at the 2:00 mark...
Depending on how evenly applied the tuft on that 3-ply stuff is, I feel like it might make a good sub-floor layer. Like if you intended to do some sort of tongue and groove flooring. (Assuming that it's smooth enough that it wouldn't effect the laying of the flooring.) My only concern is what the stuff is made of. Do you have a link to the product or know exactly what its called? (I only skimmed the video to get the gist of which material you were talking about.)

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Wonderful conversation! You have all convinced me to stick with my plan to use foam board insulation. I find all this discussion fascinating, especially since insulating is my next step. I have been kicking myself all winter that I was not winterized.
I'm glad that the thread is giving you some food for thought. That's what I was hoping it would do for myself and obviously for others.

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If you use the rigid foam with the radiant barrier on it, doesnt that "shiny side" go out to the metal of the bus?
The shiny side is the radiant barrier portion if I'm not mistaken. While logic would say face it outward, I feel like since its a "Radiant Barrier" and not a "Conductive Barrier" it being in contact with the outer skins would negate its usefulness. In my opinion it would be better to have it facing inward. but thats just my $0.02
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Old 02-17-2018, 11:54 AM   #74
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Face the foil inwards. It helps keep the heat in the bus when you need it.

The other side has a steel skin. Facing the foil towards it would achieve nothing.
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Old 02-17-2018, 01:50 PM   #75
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I use foil side out (of insulating foam board) in my window covering sections. All the work I have seen used foil side out. What is everyone else doing?
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Old 02-17-2018, 03:16 PM   #76
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Most of the foil faced foam board actually has foil on both sides. It's just that one side has color on it for some reason. I just installed some 3M stuff in a warehouse where we had the same long discussion/argument about which way the "shiny" side goes...in or out.

Then someone read the fine print info right on the boards which said...it didn't matter. Both sides were actually the same.

Don't know what you are working with but, like they say,
when all else fails...read the instructions. Worked in our case.
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Old 02-19-2018, 04:24 PM   #77
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Im in the middle of insulating my bus walls right now, and have been using Great Stuff "big gap filler" cans of spray foam.

Its... well... great stuff.

After tearing out the stock insulation there was around a foot tall space below the steel rail the seats bolt to which i filled with the stuff. Cost around 70 bucks total. Im putting fancy wood planks up to replace the inside wall panels and filling the gap with foam as i go, around 8" a day working upward. Projected foam costs are about $175, but may be more since ive bought out the local menards and home depot of the stuff...

It is a closed cell expanding foam and does not absorb water

It does catalyse with moisture to cause expansion, so make sure surfaces are fairly dry (blasted the heat for 12h 1st) beforehand to avoid trapping a pocket of moisture against the steel - that is the reason some say 1 part foam corrodes steel.

I recommend it for anyone wanting spray foam w/o the cost of a pro installation

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Old 02-19-2018, 06:33 PM   #78
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Any idea how that might compare to liquid nails or some other strong adhesive? Holding a panel upside down on a ceiling that gets hot in the summer and freezing cold in the winter year after year, all the time getting vibrated while driving. That's what kept me from using rigid in the first place.

Signed, no faith in glue.
I just saw a pinterest skoolie where the guy did the ceiling in (nice) plywood that he flexed by compression. It would hold the rigid stuff up in place nicely I would think.
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Old 02-19-2018, 06:40 PM   #79
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I use foil side out (of insulating foam board) in my window covering sections. All the work I have seen used foil side out. What is everyone else doing?
The windows don't have a steel skin, so it makes sense to me to put the foil side OUT on the windows, especially if you are trying to deal with heat outside as opposed to cold outside.

If you want to keep your heat in because you live in Alaska, in theory anyway you'd want to foil on the inside. If you live in Arizona, you'd want it foil side out.

Naturally I'm trying to do both things so...... Still trying to figure this out!
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Old 02-19-2018, 07:24 PM   #80
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Just for the record...Great Stuff eats metal. And if sprayed into a closed location...will never cure.

Not "Great" for use on an RV or Skoolie.
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