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Old 12-12-2017, 06:24 PM   #41
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Location: Billings, MT
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Year: 2003
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Chassis: HDX
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At least 1" of rigid insulation is necessary. More is better. You might have to do some trimming around the rear dog house (for RE buses) and the AC channels.

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Old 07-06-2019, 07:56 PM   #42
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I have extra 1/4” cork underlayment leftover from the subfloor, so I’m planning to glue this to the side walls, then glue 1” rigid insulation over the top of that to fit between the sidewall steel ribs. Will add wood furring strips to the steel ribs and attach finish pine to that for interior wall.
Ceiling I have a different plan.
I have dynamite layer on the roof in the front for engine and road noise while driving.
On top of that, I have 3” rockwool insulation and will build wood furring strips on the steel ribs to extend the roof 1” to fit the insulation (no compression!) then, the pine finish wood will screw into those wooden strips.
With radiant barriers in standard homes/ green building construction, you need a 1” air gap between the hot surface and the foil face so the air can escape and move around behind that space. Adding radiant barrier blocked in with no air gap is not going to work as intended to block that radiant heat. Keep this in mind on your builds!
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Old 12-13-2020, 09:27 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by Shorty22 View Post
I have extra 1/4” cork underlayment leftover from the subfloor, so I’m planning to glue this to the side walls, then glue 1” rigid insulation over the top of that to fit between the sidewall steel ribs. Will add wood furring strips to the steel ribs and attach finish pine to that for interior wall.
Ceiling I have a different plan.
I have dynamite layer on the roof in the front for engine and road noise while driving.
On top of that, I have 3” rockwool insulation and will build wood furring strips on the steel ribs to extend the roof 1” to fit the insulation (no compression!) then, the pine finish wood will screw into those wooden strips.
With radiant barriers in standard homes/ green building construction, you need a 1” air gap between the hot surface and the foil face so the air can escape and move around behind that space. Adding radiant barrier blocked in with no air gap is not going to work as intended to block that radiant heat. Keep this in mind on your builds!

Hello there! Can you tell me a little more about how you designed your floor insulation with cork underpayment? Did you use anything else. like foam board or plywood? Is the cork your insulation, or is it serving as your floor?

Thanks so much! Eager to focus on as much non toxic as possible.
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Old 12-13-2020, 11:49 PM   #44
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@Savier

My flooring layers are:
-Sheet metal body (bottom), with galvanized metal primer
-1x2” “floor joists” spaced every 24” o.c. along width (parallel to axels) glued to metal floor AND -Between the wood floor joists are 1” rigid foam board (meant for subfloors)
-reflectix (foil bubble wrap stuff) layer over the top
-5/8” plywood layer, edges meet floor joists, screwed to wooden floor joists, taped and caulked seams
-1/4” cork underlayment layer, seams taped
-tongue and groove engineered hardwood floating floors (top)

furniture will be secured to side walls (mainly along the chair rail and 2x4” wood studs between steel ribs) and will wedge a over the floor to secure the flooring in place with various locations where furniture will be screwed down.

In hindsight, I wish I would have spaced the floor joists where it would match up perfectly with the base of my furniture and/or taken into consideration lining up the wall studs (steel bus ribs) with the floor joists for a cleaner lineup.
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Old 02-08-2021, 08:51 AM   #45
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I know this was posted 13 years ago, so asking a question might be a long shot. That being said:
After putting the aluminum flake/asphalt mix on, would one be able to drill through it easily enough? We want to partially deck the top of ours, but I know the paint must come before the decking.
Thanks for reading/replying. Any other advice would be appreciated. We will be buying our bus sometime this month and are ready to drop $5k to start the build!
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Old 07-01-2021, 11:10 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Steve View Post
Another thing you see people doing is drilling some holes in the panels and squirting expanding foam up into the roof so that you don't have to actually remove the panels.
I know this is 14 years old, but i like this idea. A lot.
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Old 07-01-2021, 11:29 AM   #47
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https://www.retrofoamofmichigan.com/...ion-difference
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Old 07-01-2021, 11:30 AM   #48
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Join Date: Sep 2014
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http://https://www.vermontfoaminsula...existing-walls
Quote:
Injection Spray foam insulation is applied as a liquid and very slowly expands in size. ... Unfortunately, spray foam cannot be added to a wall that has already been insulated with fiberglass.
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Old 07-01-2021, 12:24 PM   #49
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^^^ Doh! Right. So they say.... lol. Id have to look into why.

even if not that easy, id still prob go that route. strip then re panel then fill. Bus im looknnat has 2 ac's (broke im sure) but maybe it was insulated good and dont have to touch it.
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Old 07-05-2021, 09:56 AM   #50
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Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: Baja often, Oregon frequently
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Year: 1996
Coachwork: Our hot little grubbies...
Chassis: Ford CF8000 ExpeditionVehicle
Engine: Cummins 505ci mechanical
Rated Cap: Three RedHeelers
2003, we converted a 1997 Ford CF8000 commercial truck to our concept of an ExpeditionVehicle.
.
We chose this vehicle after a couple years of delivering RecreationVehicles manufacturer-to-dealer and dealer-to-shows.
With decades of experience in many dozens of different RecreationVehicle types -- including BillionBuxBus conversions -- compressed into a hundred thousand quick miles, we realized RecreationVehicle insulation is less effective than we require.
Less.
.
Similar to most civilized housing, RecreationVehicle indoor comfort relies on inputting brute force in the form of massive amounts of petroleum, wood, coal, or electricity.
That just don't make a whole lot a sense... but that is merely my opinion.
.
For our conversion, we mounted an adhesive-backed acoustic insulation to our interior walls and ceiling.
Inside that, we glued one-inch 'pink-board' designed for wet environs such as a bathroom in a stand-still house.
Inside that, we have two-inch foil-sided expanded foam-board.
.
As usual, my go-to adhesive is Vulcum 116 in the caulking-style squeeze-tube.
.
.
Our floor is one-inch pink-board with half-inch plywood over it.
For visual impact, we have a bamboo perimeter with slate center.
.
The dry-van box on our rig had zero-zero-zero insulation, so our choices were simple.
.
To help stabilize our interior temperature, our windows are 36x12 (a foot tall by three feet wide) dual-pane sliders designed for a stand-still house.
I installed these at our eye-level standing inside, about eight-feet above pavement.
.
Tiny windows plus massive insulation... plus NO HOLES IN THE ROOF.
Holes in the roof are a trade-mark signature designer 'feature' of Shiny! factory RecreationVehicles, and no rational person believes any good could come of that.
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