Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-20-2024, 01:42 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2022
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 6
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Chevrolet
Chassis: Thomas Built
Engine: Chevrolet 366 Big Block
Rated Cap: 53
Red face Looking for thinnest flooring/subfloor option with some insulation

Hi! I have a 1988 Chevy B6000 I've lived in for 2 years and we're finally insulating it. The South Dakota winters have been really hard. Our original bus floor is 3/4" thick and we need the replacement to be the same or thinner, as my wife is already taller than the bus ceiling (just barely) and a roof raise is not in our budget yet. It would definitely be nice to have some insulation on the floor, but if we can't, we can't. Is there any really thin insulation or a good subfloor option with insulative properties?

We've lived in this bus for 2 years without doing a full conversion, and it sure has been hard. It would just be nice for my pet's water bowls to not freeze at night.

ridetherails is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2024, 02:15 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
ewo1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Central Tx.
Posts: 2,091
Year: 1999
Chassis: Amtran / International
Engine: DT466E HT 250HP - Md3060
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridetherails View Post
Hi! I have a 1988 Chevy B6000 I've lived in for 2 years and we're finally insulating it. The South Dakota winters have been really hard. Our original bus floor is 3/4" thick and we need the replacement to be the same or thinner, as my wife is already taller than the bus ceiling (just barely) and a roof raise is not in our budget yet. It would definitely be nice to have some insulation on the floor, but if we can't, we can't. Is there any really thin insulation or a good subfloor option with insulative properties?

We've lived in this bus for 2 years without doing a full conversion, and it sure has been hard. It would just be nice for my pet's water bowls to not freeze at night.
If your not driving the bus at all, permanantely parked, do you have any skirting under the bus ?
ewo1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2024, 02:58 PM   #3
Bus Geek
 
Jolly Roger bus 223's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Swansboro,NC
Posts: 3,010
Year: 86
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford B700
Engine: 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
some metal skirting or sand bag skirting and a forced air heater blowing under the bus with something like crawlspace louvres.
Jolly Roger bus 223 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2024, 05:59 PM   #4
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2022
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 6
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Chevrolet
Chassis: Thomas Built
Engine: Chevrolet 366 Big Block
Rated Cap: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ewo1 View Post
If your not driving the bus at all, permanantely parked, do you have any skirting under the bus ?
We're not permanently parked. We stay around the same area because I'm in college.
ridetherails is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2024, 06:17 PM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: topeka kansas
Posts: 1,798
Year: 1954
Coachwork: wayne
Chassis: old f500- new 2005 f-450
Engine: cummins 12 valve
Rated Cap: 20? five rows of 4?
lowest cost

lay down 1" thick foam . walk directly on the foam. shoes off at the door.

william
magnakansas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2024, 06:27 PM   #6
New Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2022
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 6
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Chevrolet
Chassis: Thomas Built
Engine: Chevrolet 366 Big Block
Rated Cap: 53
We're not parked...
ridetherails is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2024, 08:31 PM   #7
Bus Crazy
 
ewo1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Central Tx.
Posts: 2,091
Year: 1999
Chassis: Amtran / International
Engine: DT466E HT 250HP - Md3060
If your not parked i'm guessing the bus moves frequently.
replacing the floor insulation, I don't know of any materials that would help you.

Easy fix for now... place some 1 inch foam board around the outside of the bus, creating a temporary skirting. Use foil tape to seal it all up. you can even paint it to match the bus or background. when the weather warms up, remove the skirting, store it or FB marketplace it...your choice.

Easiest way to solve your problem until next fall.
ewo1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2024, 09:20 PM   #8
Bus Crazy
 
turf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 2,391
Year: 1993
Coachwork: bluebird
Engine: 5.9 Cummins, Allison AT1545
Rated Cap: 2
my bus came spray foamed underneath from the factory.

i'd have a similar problem if i had to insulate inside the bus, but the way it is, i fit fine.

you'd have to clean the undercarriage pretty good, but i've seen it done to other buses as well.

i probably have an 1.5" of foam thats been under my bus since 93. a lot of miles and that stuff is darn near indestructible. dont believe someone that says it wont last.

good luck
__________________
.
Turfmobile Build Thread
turf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2024, 05:42 PM   #9
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 229
Year: 2003
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DT466e 215hp Allison 2500
Rated Cap: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by magnakansas View Post
lay down 1" thick foam . walk directly on the foam. shoes off at the door.

william

Yes the foam is warm on bare feet, maybe a thin layer of cork flooring on top of the foam for a better look...
Timeline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2024, 03:09 PM   #10
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Location: Full-Timers
Posts: 134
Year: 2001
Coachwork: International
Chassis: 3800
Engine: DT-466e, AT-545
Chuck Cassady (YouTube) just put down some of that pink foam board, no framing or anything. He has a whole video (maybe a few now) about why he does it and how well it works. Probably what I would do if I did it again.

Also, I would put a big conduit under the floor somewhere, running left-to-right across the bus so I can run wires to the opposite side easier for any future upgrades/renovations. I have the darndest time trying to get wires to the other side of my bus now, and really wish I had some conduit there to make it easier.
Beeb2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2024, 03:28 PM   #11
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Snowflake, Arizona
Posts: 344
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: All American Rear Engine
Engine: C-8.3-300 Cummins MD3060
Rated Cap: 40 Prisoners
Insulation

You might look into Air Skirts. The old Bluebird Wanderlodge had the underside spray foamed so it is very durable.
Dragonpop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2024, 04:03 PM   #12
Bus Nut
 
Rock-N-Ruth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Freedom Field, New Mexico
Posts: 461
Year: 1998
Coachwork: International
Chassis: Amtrans
Engine: 444E
Rated Cap: 84 pas
When putting insulation on top of the floor is not really viable, the obvious answer is put insulation under the floor. It can be some work, and currently pink insulation foam board is expensive, but it will give you the desired effect without making your inside space smaller.
At the current price of 2 in XPS foam, a spray foam kit may actually be more affordable.
Rock-N-Ruth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2024, 06:04 PM   #13
Bus Crazy
 
nikitis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2023
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 1,019
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beeb2 View Post
Chuck Cassady (YouTube) just put down some of that pink foam board, no framing or anything. He has a whole video (maybe a few now) about why he does it and how well it works. Probably what I would do if I did it again.

Also, I would put a big conduit under the floor somewhere, running left-to-right across the bus so I can run wires to the opposite side easier for any future upgrades/renovations. I have the darndest time trying to get wires to the other side of my bus now, and really wish I had some conduit there to make it easier.
Thanks for this idea, I'm at this stage with flooring, and didn't even consider putting a hot/cold water pipe, and electrical conduit, maybe one in the front and one in the back for easier upgrades down the road.
nikitis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2024, 07:09 AM   #14
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: Baja often, Oregon frequently
Posts: 436
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Our hot little grubbies...
Chassis: Ford CF8000 ExpeditionVehicle
Engine: Cummins 505ci mechanical
Rated Cap: Five Heelers
2003, we built our ExpeditionVehicle with 1" pink-board laid on the box floor.
Atop that, we laid half-inch plywood, painted on all surfaces to seal.
.
Our visible floor is bamboo around the perimeter, slate in the center.
.
We heat using a Wave 3 catalytic heater.
Sitting on the slate on its stubby legs, it warms the slate, then that radiates throughout the interior.
Over two decades full-time live-aboard, zero issues with the pink-board crumbling or otherwise deteriorating.
.
Our introduction with plenty of portraits, plus our reasons for our decisions:
https://vanlivingforum.com/threads/e...8/#post-576110
LargeMargeInBaja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2024, 09:20 AM   #15
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2023
Posts: 8
"When putting insulation on top of the floor is not really viable, the obvious answer is put insulation under the floor. It can be some work, and currently pink insulation foam board is expensive, but it will give you the desired effect without making your inside space smaller."

How far from your exhaust do you need to maintain to keep your foam viable?
Red_Fir is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2024, 09:39 AM   #16
Bus Crazy
 
nikitis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2023
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 1,019
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 29
If there is room under the bus that is the best solution. The target R Value you want to reach is 20. The best materials man can purchase to reach that is the XPS boards, and you need 4 inches of that. Spray Foam is also fine but you cannot walk on that, but you could maybe foam under the bus, and then put a protective paint on the foam itself.



Most people can get by with R15 value unless you live in extreme climates.


Ideal is 20, but even for extreme climates 20 can be underwhelming. You definitely don't want any less than R15 or you won't really feel much of a difference, These levels are needed to keep the temperature in the bus from an AC or heater. Otherwise it leaves easily and requires longer cooling or heating runs which also in turn means more electricity wasted on the AC/Heater which is one of the largest electricity used items.



The unfortunate reality is you're gonna need 4 inches of XPS to reach R20, that hard limit is a materials limitation. This is why people opt for roof raises all the time because they once they put 3 inches on the ceiling, and 4 on the floor it's now 7 inches smaller.
nikitis is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
floor, floor insulation height, insulation, subfloor

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.