Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-27-2020, 11:12 AM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 2
Making a Skoolie in Europe

Does anyone have experience with making a skoolie in Europe? Did you import a school bus or did you buy a non-school bus?


If the former, what were the costs like?


If the latter, what are some of the differences between buying old city buses and such and school buses? What kind of dimensions do the buses tend to have?
WeAreABridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2020, 11:56 AM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Lebanon, Indiana
Posts: 309
Coachwork: In the market
Showing my American ignorance - don't they have school buses in Europe? They may not be the iconic yellow American buses but I can't imagine everyone is within walking distance or they're as auto-centric as we are in America.

I would guess that importing an American diesel bus into the EU would be nearly impossible given emissions regulations. If you could get yourself an inter-urban bus which are probably quite similar to American inter-urbans and some even built by the same companies then it would simply be more like a motorcoach conversion than a skoolie conversion. If course there may be not nearly the volume of uses buses on the secondary market in EU than in USA so I understand if local shopping may seem limited. The other factor trying to import a unicorn bus is sourcing parts when things break which will be time-consuming, expensive and frustrating. Its like when Americans import an iconic London double-decker bus - unless you're making money with it as a tourist icon it'll bleed you dry as a personal vehicle-turned-RV plus may not be legal to drive everywhere in the US. I would fear you could run into these types of obstacles sooner or later.
Sehnsucht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2020, 12:01 PM   #3
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 20,128
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sehnsucht View Post
Showing my American ignorance - don't they have school buses in Europe? They may not be the iconic yellow American buses but I can't imagine everyone is within walking distance or they're as auto-centric as we are in America.

I would guess that importing an American diesel bus into the EU would be nearly impossible given emissions regulations. If you could get yourself an inter-urban bus which are probably quite similar to American inter-urbans and some even built by the same companies then it would simply be more like a motorcoach conversion than a skoolie conversion. If course there may be not nearly the volume of uses buses on the secondary market in EU than in USA so I understand if local shopping may seem limited. The other factor trying to import a unicorn bus is sourcing parts when things break which will be time-consuming, expensive and frustrating. Its like when Americans import an iconic London double-decker bus - unless you're making money with it as a tourist icon it'll bleed you dry as a personal vehicle-turned-RV plus may not be legal to drive everywhere in the US. I would fear you could run into these types of obstacles sooner or later.
Most kids in Europe walk or take city buses. On rare occasions like field trips they'll book a coach for the day.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2020, 12:28 PM   #4
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Lebanon, Indiana
Posts: 309
Coachwork: In the market
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
Most kids in Europe walk or take city buses. On rare occasions like field trips they'll book a coach for the day.
Now see there! It makes me wonder why with a little better route planning we here in the US cities at least couldn't utilize the same buses and routes for urban transit AND student transit instead of overlaying two completely separate networks that probably constantly intersect. I'm sure there's some perfectly reasonable regulatory reason why that's illegal or something.
Sehnsucht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2020, 01:00 PM   #5
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 20,128
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
The oil industry's iron grip on our economy and our litigious nature mean our kids ride to school in dedicated fuel guzzlers built to crazy standards. A lot of palms are greased along the way and its just a part of our culture.

There's a cool series on how kids in less fortunate areas get to school.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2020, 01:23 PM   #6
New Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
The oil industry's iron grip on our economy and our litigious nature mean our kids ride to school in dedicated fuel guzzlers built to crazy standards. A lot of palms are greased along the way and its just a part of our culture.

I think places in North America are just much further apart. I'm from Canada and when I visited Switzerland last summer, it really struck me how *close* everything is: you can drive five minutes and go through three different towns.


I think it's just that the nature of how places in North America were settled and built has created a different environment than in Europe.
WeAreABridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2020, 02:13 PM   #7
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 12,621
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DTA360 / MT643
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
city busses can and have been used for school service, vasrious programs have existed over the years (I know we used to here).. but the main concern became ensuring students got where they were supposed to... the tendency of students to jump off the bus and go to friends' houses, ice cream shops, etc.. caused issues.. whereas school busses drop kids in their own neighborhoods.. kids can obviously jump on thye wrong school bus and go elsewhere but seems like that doesnt happen as much as it did with city busses.. not to mention the city routes dont penetrate the neighborhoods near as much here in the USA like they do overseas....


there were combo routes in altoona PA.. they had a fleet of Fishbowls that were comno city busses but also had the school lights to make school stops.. a friend of mine has one..
cadillackid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2020, 04:22 PM   #8
Bus Crazy
 
musigenesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 1,947
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466e
Rated Cap: 65C-43A
I grew up in a college town where by agreement the local university's bus service delivered most of the kids via add-on routes with their transit buses. So I never got to ride a school bus growing up, except for the field trips to go see Shamu and cancerous lungs and whatnot. That's probably why I swooned over the first school bus I saw for sale.
__________________
Rusty 87 build thread
musigenesis is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2020, 07:30 PM   #9
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Lebanon, Indiana
Posts: 309
Coachwork: In the market
Quote:
Originally Posted by WeAreABridge View Post
I think places in North America are just much further apart. I'm from Canada and when I visited Switzerland last summer, it really struck me how *close* everything is: you can drive five minutes and go through three different towns.


I think it's just that the nature of how places in North America were settled and built has created a different environment than in Europe.
I think there's probably a lot of truth in that. America is relatively young compared to European countries and as such wasn't settled and built with the implied constraints of transit nor is it as geographically constrained to cause close proximity out of necessity. I think this is also one of the factors that makes high speed rail in America such a developmental challenge because it's just easier and faster to jump on a plane and be on the other coast in a few hours.
Sehnsucht is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
city bus, dimensions, europe, import

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×