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Old 03-03-2021, 08:28 AM   #1
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Propane tank location??

Wondering if anyone has some input on propane tank location. The plan was to build a compartment just behind the left front wheel. When brainstorming with my son yesterday we realized that it fits perfectly in the engine compartment of my RE bus. The only thing it feeds is an on-demand water heater so I only need a 20# tank. The space is well ventilated and I doubt that temperature would be an issue. Is there anything I am not thinking of?20210302_203155.jpg20210302_203145.jpg

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Old 03-03-2021, 08:42 AM   #2
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NO. NO. NO. You do not want it there. It will get way to hot. My RE compartment runs about 145-175 in the summer. If it blows off do to high pressure your alternator can ignite the vapor and your hard work goes up in smoke. I don't mean to be rude, but no fires please.
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Old 03-03-2021, 08:55 AM   #3
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NO. NO. NO. You do not want it there. It will get way to hot. My RE compartment runs about 145-175 in the summer. If it blows off do to high pressure your alternator can ignite the vapor and your hard work goes up in smoke. I don't mean to be rude, but no fires please.
Thatís good points about the temperature, pressure relief, and ignition sources.

If youíve never experienced a propane tank pressure relief venting, take it from me, itís a real thing and 120 degrees is enough to make it happen.
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Old 03-03-2021, 09:20 AM   #4
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I used to drive a propane transport truck and have a healthy respect for LPG. Do not ever take it lightly.
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Old 03-03-2021, 10:15 AM   #5
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I used to drive a propane transport truck and have a healthy respect for LPG. Do not ever take it lightly.
Stifler - Hear Hear.jpg

Unlike the world at large. I see idiots lighting up cigarettes in frigging gas stations right next to a rack of propane tanks. Some people are just too stupid to be left unsupervised, and in many cases, it's a special kind of stupid that only learns with a baseball bat applied in a certain manner. This, and my asthma, are why I get my gas at 3 am when no one is around.
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Old 03-03-2021, 11:29 AM   #6
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Old 03-03-2021, 12:17 PM   #7
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Old 03-03-2021, 04:28 PM   #8
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You can tell by some of the responses people care about you!

Best to keep it under the bus, outside of the conditioned air space (your bus 'envelope'), and never in front of the front wheels nor behind the rear wheels.

If you must put it in the conditioned air space inside your build, put it in an airtight locker that has a 2" diameter vent coming in from the top, from all the way outside the bus, and a 2" diameter vent going down, all the way under the bus. Total of four of these if you have two barbecue-sized tanks. The vent is for getting rid of propane gas if leaked (it is heavier than air).

Lots of people do it wrong, so congrats on asking the question!
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Old 03-03-2021, 04:30 PM   #9
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I mounted my propane tank below the floor, alongside the transmission in both of my Crown conversions. That area is all open underneath with lots of airflow. I am rather sure it never gets overly hot in there. Going down the road airflow would push any leakage from overpressure in the tank toward the rear or out from under the bus that way. The engine temperature doesn't get past 190 degrees on either Crown, and the exhaust and radiator are on the opposite side of the bus from the propane tank. The alternators are about 4 feet from the propane tank. I would mount the propane tank as far from the engine as reasonable (and any exhaust system components)
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