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Old 02-26-2017, 09:47 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by pepepito View Post
I like this idea.



I really like the concept, but I would be concerned about the weight from above transferring to the skin of the bus. Maybe he plans to attach these over the ribs of the bus, or maybe having this attached to the skin right next to the rib is close enough that it transfers properly. I think I will feel much safer hauling several thousand pounds up above with the mounts on the hat channel between the windows. This will then transfer the weight to the frame of the bus.

After pricing out the couplings (Kee Klamps) that I had been looking at (posted in another thread here), I desided I am going to need to find a better method. That, or I may reduce the number of support points. I honestly feel like what is in the above thread is a bit of overkill. I think I could safely use the same system with half or even a third of the mount points.

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Old 02-26-2017, 10:05 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by pepepito View Post
I like this idea.


Would be much better to drill those curved plates with holes big enough to clear the existing rivet heads.
Then new holes for fasteners to secure the those plates directly on top of the ribs.

Using Uni Strut or Kee Klamps, or any other "tinker toy" type of system of structure building gets expensive.
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Old 02-26-2017, 11:46 AM   #23
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This photo shows a “hat” profile, with my roof-raising extension inside.






The hat section has the outside panel riveted to it. This piece is from window height, so there is only the narrow panel between the windows.






Here you see that better.





On Millicent, I have a few of these posts protruding straight up from the window post hat sections, where the wall curves inward and becomes roof. They are for hanging shade tarps, but same concept as for a deck. The post slips into the hat channel and is bolted to it. Next time I raise a roof, I think I will simply make the extensions long enough to also be roof deck posts. Of course, it requires frequent re-caulking to keep rain out.
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Old 02-27-2017, 10:19 AM   #24
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Elliot,

Why not run a weld around it? I know the roof skin is thin but baby mig and favor the post should be ok?
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Old 02-27-2017, 11:20 AM   #25
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Elliot,

Why not run a weld around it? I know the roof skin is thin but baby mig and favor the post should be ok?
I was about to say something similar. I like this install method, and if one were to say slide a plate with a hole the right size, over the square tube and down onto the roof of the bus, you could then weld the plate to the tube, and then seal and rivet the plate to the roof. This would create a "shield" over the top of the joint, and also stiffen the connection point to the bus roof/ribs.
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Old 02-27-2017, 06:04 PM   #26
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I saw this few months ago, is like a smaller version of the one I posted :


https://goo.gl/photos/fmUuZcy6AHDJFr178
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Old 02-27-2017, 06:13 PM   #27
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I like that. They used angle with holes in it. Good weight reduction yet maintain most of the structural strength. The roof mounts look simple as well.

Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
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Old 02-27-2017, 08:54 PM   #28
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If you tried to weld the box tube to the skin, would the black goop between the skin and the hat channel cause problems welding? What is that stuff called anyways? It kind of reminds me of roofing tar.
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Old 02-27-2017, 10:28 PM   #29
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Although a school bus body is immensely strong in terms of a crash, stuff like this tends to wriggle around, which could crack the skin if welded. I just re-caulk mine once in a while -- maybe couple years, when I see a gap.

That short bus.... I cannot quite make it out with my old eyes. But if the posts are bolted onto the outside.... They appear to be only about 1" wide, so they could punch thru the skin, into the channel of the hat section. Make them as wide as the brim of the hat -- two or three inches.

(If they are sunk into the hat section, "my" way... never mind.)
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Old 02-27-2017, 11:35 PM   #30
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Although a school bus body is immensely strong in terms of a crash, stuff like this tends to wriggle around, which could crack the skin if welded. I just re-caulk mine once in a while -- maybe couple years, when I see a gap.

That short bus.... I cannot quite make it out with my old eyes. But if the posts are bolted onto the outside.... They appear to be only about 1" wide, so they could punch thru the skin, into the channel of the hat section. Make them as wide as the brim of the hat -- two or three inches.

(If they are sunk into the hat section, "my" way... never mind.)
It would appear that they are bolted through the roof, through the middle of the roof rib. I would agree, making them the full width of the rib would not be much more difficult and would transfer more of the weight to the full rib and not take the chance of it "denting" in the area in the middle of the rib.


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- Uploaded with Skitch
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Old 02-27-2017, 11:46 PM   #31
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When I build mine I take out some of the the rivets and drill the base so the rest of the rivets can pop through and then I will bolt it through the rib with some welded nut in the other side for easy removal if needed, but I think that I will reinforce the rib a bit more before doing that.
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Old 03-01-2017, 08:13 PM   #32
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I Really like the curved mounting plates. I was debating spending the extra money and going all aluminum for the deck, using bleacher walkway as the decking and square tube as the supports.
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Old 08-14-2018, 04:42 PM   #33
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Galvanic corrosion.
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Old 08-14-2018, 04:50 PM   #34
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Galvanic corrosion.
If that were a concern, I would cut old tire tubes and put a rubber cushion pad between the roof and rack.
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Old 08-14-2018, 07:18 PM   #35
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Ya...aluminum is great for a deck but absolutely MUST be isolated from any steel. But...when I did the math...there is little weight benefit going with aluminum. By the time you get enough aluminum to do the job...you are within just a couple of pounds of what steel will weigh. At least on my shorty anyway.
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Old 08-14-2018, 07:34 PM   #36
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I think people are too anal about galvanic corrosion. 3 things need to be in place for it to happen. Dissimilar metals (aluminum and steel) have to be combined with an electrolyte to start the process. No electrolytes involved on the roof of a Skoolie. I built a lot of race cars with aluminum secured directly to steel and never ever saw any evidence of G corrosion.
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Old 08-14-2018, 07:55 PM   #37
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Ya...aluminum is great for a deck but absolutely MUST be isolated from any steel. But...when I did the math...there is little weight benefit going with aluminum. By the time you get enough aluminum to do the job...you are within just a couple of pounds of what steel will weigh. At least on my shorty anyway.
When boondocking or parking in sketchy or urban areas its best not to have a lot of exposed aluminum.
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Old 08-14-2018, 07:57 PM   #38
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My main aluminum usage is for the anti-alien, anti- government hat I wear.
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