Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×


Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-15-2022, 08:19 AM   #1
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Seeking bus models w/12' or longer swingout for 36'-38' long front-engine flat nose

I am not made of money nor do I own a frame and body shop, so I have come to accept the idea that chopping from the middle of the bus is not going to happen on my budget.

So that means I'm removing it all from the tale so that the project can remain feasible since I am on a small and tight budget. So I need the longest swing out (that's the distance from the rear axle to the rear bumper) on a 36 or 37-foot bus.

If they make a 38' long bus with a 14' swing out, I'd be very happy to hear about it, but I doubt it exists. However, I guess stranger things have happened.

~~~

So far I sorta assume the longest swingout is about 12.5' long, but I could be mistaken.

Who has the longest swingout for a 36-38 foot long bus is the question at hand. Longer than 38' does NOT work! So please no 40' long suggestions.

Thanks in advance for all your helpful consideration and responses!
Attached Thumbnails
30 + 30 best of all 2.jpg  

FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-15-2022, 08:47 AM   #2
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Who likes complexity when it can be simplified? So here are some helpful examples of max swingout lengths, so you know what specs I am looking for according to each foot of length.

~~~

If the swingout is 12 feet long, then since I require 6 feet for the swingout, I would remove 6 feet from the tale and the result of that must be a 30' long bus. So a 12' swingout is good for a 36' long flat nose bus.

If the swingout is 13 feet long, then I can remove 7 feet from the tale leaving a 6-foot long tale, and this works on a 37' long flat nose.

If the swingout is 14 feet long, then I can remove 8 feet from the tale leaving a 6-foot swingout, and this is good on a 38' long flat nose.

~~~

I feel I need a max load rating because my build is extra heavy and I don't want to end up overweight on probably the rear axle or overweight on the GVWR.
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-15-2022, 10:11 AM   #3
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: West Ohio
Posts: 3,010
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 1753
Engine: 6.9 International
Rated Cap: 65
From your picture, I assume you're looking at making a coach and trailer set up with both living quarters. It'd be a neat project, but likely a daydream if you're not made of money or owning a frame/chassis shop.

However, I'll indulge in the fantasy with some thoughts.

For starters, most buses are rarely overweight on the rear axle. The front axle is where it's most likely to occur. Especially on an FE transit bus, which is what you'll likely use if you plan on having a hallway between the bus and the trailer. For instance, rear axles can be had in weight ratings over 40k lbs, fronts not so much. You can get heavier then 12k lbs on the front, but you still have to account for the limit of the tires, normally 6k each or so. Unfortunately you can't run a dual on the front like you can on the rear .

FWIW, when the district was ordering a new bus, we'd recommend opting for one with heavier axles on the front. Stock would be something like a 12k, and I believe the upgrade was 16k. Granted we were still limited by the tire weight rating, and the plate would still state 12k or so, but we went through way less king pins, tie rods, brakes etc. with the heavier axle. That heavier axle was predominantly used in dump trucks IIRC, as when I'd call the nearby truck dealer for parts, they'd always comment something like that about it.

If you need heavier rating then a 12k lb, you can upgrade the front to 24.5 inch tires, or you can run a super single on the front for even more weight, but you'll likely have to clearance both to fit under a bus. Also, those super singles are often limited to 55mph when used as a steer tire, so don't plan on going 75 with them.
__________________
My build: The Silver Bullet https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/p...llet-9266.html
Booyah45828 is online now  
Old 08-15-2022, 10:40 AM   #4
Bus Nut
 
fo4imtippin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Location: Jax Beach, FL
Posts: 371
Year: 2003
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: TC2000 28ft
Engine: Cummins ISB 5.9 24v, MD3060
Rated Cap: 14
my bus is 28ft and tagged at 30k. It has 21k rear axle and 13.5k front axle. They make same axle (slightly beefier) at 23k and 25k. Most of these buses have similar frame rails (mine are same as a class 8 truck and could hold a lot more than the rated GVWR). I know you have a fantasy about chopping a particular bus into pieces (if you ever find one with the exact specifications you require). It would be much more practical to find the body you want and move the axle forward or backward (the suspension bolts onto the frame rails, usually with frame inserts or cross bracing). If the bus you find doesn't have the high GVWR you are seeking, then you can swap an axle found through Vanderhaags or a truck parts store. If the slide out is dependent on wheel wells, then you can have the bus lifted and remove the wheel wells for a flat floor (get air ride to make that easier). With these solutions, you don't need to start a new thread each time you decide how much exact tailswing you need to perform your surgery. All of these specifics about tailswing are pointless. You cant shop by VIN or whats in Thomas's catalog. You find busses by searching craigslist, facebook, or auctions. People have enough trouble finding buses based on general size limits coupled with reliability, if you actually want something to work out, i think you should start looking at whats actually for sale and estimate pictures by counting windows. Then if something is close, reach out to the seller for detailed measurements.
fo4imtippin is offline  
Old 08-15-2022, 12:42 PM   #5
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
...
However, I'll indulge in the fantasy with some thoughts.

(1)For starters, most buses are rarely overweight on the rear axle. The front axle is where it's most likely to occur. Especially on an FE transit bus, which is what you'll likely use if you plan on having a hallway between the bus and the trailer. For instance, rear axles can be had in weight ratings over 40k lbs, fronts not so much. You can get heavier then 12k lbs on the front, but you still have to account for the limit of the tires, normally 6k each or so. Unfortunately you can't run a dual on the front like you can on the rear .

(2)FWIW, when the district was ordering a new bus, we'd recommend opting for one with heavier axles on the front. Stock would be something like a 12k, and I believe the upgrade was 16k. Granted we were still limited by the tire weight rating, and the plate would still state 12k or so, but we went through way less king pins, tie rods, brakes etc. with the heavier axle. That heavier axle was predominantly used in dump trucks IIRC, as when I'd call the nearby truck dealer for parts, they'd always comment something like that about it.

(3)If you need heavier rating then a 12k lb, you can upgrade the front to 24.5 inch tires, or you can run a super single on the front for even more weight, but you'll likely have to clearance both to fit under a bus. Also, those super singles are often limited to 55mph when used as a steer tire, so don't plan on going 75 with them.
Ok! Thanks for the interesting and informative post.

(1) Right on. You make a good point. I will use this info to reassess my swingout situation. Because having a shorter swingout puts more weight on the front axle like you were sorta pointing out.

It pays to have the heavier duty axle. Thanks much for the excellent tip on axle ratings and also tire ratings. So helpful!!!

~~~

(2) I love this section. I feel like I already owe you lunch and a d@b my friend. Oops, ok, well you might be more of a beer or a martini guy. IDK, I just like to push the good stuff is all. LOL

Awesome info. Wishing for a deep dive but will take what I get. I have LONG wondered what is more narrow than a super single, but larger than a standard semi or bus tire, like a 11R22.5 I guess is a defacto size.

Can't I go from 11R to 12R and larger, or?

~~~

(3) I love this info! I was a trucker so if my CB was working, I could literally turn it on, and break 19 for the answer and I would probably get it in short order. LOL

They would know about how to run super singles for steers if they want to go over 55. Probably need to get a high enough load rating version for higher speed, so they are probably even more expensive than the already expensive super singles for the rest of the rig.

I kinda remember talking to a driver about that about 2 decades ago back when I was still driving semi-OVR.

~~~

He probably did say the fronts cost more than the rest so that almost certainly verifies your point about the steers having the higher spec and higher price, sorta like doing the work of two wheels in one.

I was always just a company driver, but of course, he was an owner-operator. I didn't really learn much but got me interested in the topic. Was a short conversation.

Live and learn. I would buy full-speed steers even if they cost 150 more each, or even if I needed to go back down to a fat standard tire of proper load rating. Safety first, so the fun can be repeated over and over again.
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-15-2022, 01:08 PM   #6
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by fo4imtippin View Post
(1)my bus is 28ft and tagged at 30k. It has 21k rear axle and 13.5k front axle. They make same axle (slightly beefier) at 23k and 25k. (2)Most of these buses have similar frame rails (mine are same as a class 8 truck and could hold a lot more than the rated GVWR). (3)I know you have a fantasy about chopping a particular bus into pieces (if you ever find one with the exact specifications you require). It would be much more practical to find the body you want and move the axle forward or backward (the suspension bolts onto the frame rails, usually with frame inserts or cross bracing). (4)If the bus you find doesn't have the high GVWR you are seeking, then you can swap an axle found through Vanderhaags or a truck parts store. (5)If the slide out is dependent on wheel wells, then you can have the bus lifted and remove the wheel wells for a flat floor (get air ride to make that easier). (6)With these solutions, you don't need to start a new thread each time you decide how much exact tailswing you need to perform your surgery. All of these specifics about tailswing are pointless. You cant shop by VIN or whats in Thomas's catalog. You find busses by searching craigslist, facebook, or auctions. People have enough trouble finding buses based on general size limits coupled with reliability, if you actually want something to work out, i think you should start looking at whats actually for sale and estimate pictures by counting windows. Then if something is close, reach out to the seller for detailed measurements.
(1) Thanks for the thoughtful post and awesome tips. I might not agree with some of your conclusions, but I respect what you said for the benefit involved. Which is suspect is not small. Thanks for being so helpful.

So how does one know if they have the standard or the beefier axle version on any school bus? I suppose I simply need to look into it myself and cross check part numbers or talk to the parts guy who handles both kinds of axles. Maybe some companies have three different versions, IDK, but you gave me great food for thought.

(2) Ok, right on. That is sorta what I assumed, but did not know. It's basically a people version of a big truck.

~~~

(3) Nope, I hate the idea and wish to just do a simple build instead. But I do wish to bob the tale, and that's not the terrible offense you seem to make it out to be, as some here has already explained. Ya slice off the rear section, last 6" or to the last window, whatever structurally works out better, and just remove that small endcap.

Next, you remove like 6 feet of the bus, and then reattach the endcap! Not a huge hairy deal. Oh it's a serious challenge, one I would give to the frame shop, but this is far from fantasy and wishing to cut my rig "into pieces". No, not at all.

(4) Really, awesome. This is excellent info for the trailer build which is first.

~~~

(5) Thanks but I already thought of that. Like you suggested, I'm installing a raised floor, creating a crawlspace under the vaulted floor for massive storage and the various subsystems being indoors.

I might not have outside compartments as I am favoring max ground clearance for mild offroading.

(6) Right on and I would agree except that is not what I am doing. It was a fundamental change in which vehicle I was looking for. And the last time my post was hit by derailing trolls.

~~~

I get to start a new thread simply because my last one was trashed. Ok? Thanks for the craigslist and window counting strategy tip. I quit watching TV 25 years ago to avoid false propaganda and to seek and honor the truth for myself.

One of the best life choices I ever made. Since then I have been blessed with outstanding discoveries and inventions.

I found the answer to prayer in discovering the correct way to understand the bible. And I invented outstanding new alternative energy designs to bless mankind.

~~~

So I suppose I understand how to discover the truth for myself. Thank you, and I am glad to see you think for yourself too. Well done. However I am not asking how to study, I was asking if other people happened to already know of a model that would work given my specs listed.

If you must know, I'm actually starting on the TT RV first, so there is no need for me to divert my work to what is not presently needed. Unless you know better. LOL JK

I am trying to be topical not personal.
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-15-2022, 01:17 PM   #7
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: West Ohio
Posts: 3,010
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 1753
Engine: 6.9 International
Rated Cap: 65
11r is(was) the standard for quite a few years IMO. A lot of stuff is going to low profile p-metric stuff as of late.

If you need more weight, you can go 12r22.5, but that is a taller and wider tire. A 295/80 would be the same height as an 11r, but wider with another 1500 lbs in weight capacity. If you can go taller, but not wider, you can go with a 24.5 rim and tire. It all depends on the room you have.

Super singles on the front is primarily dump truck/cement truck stuff. Stuff that usually doesn't go over 55 anyways. I'm sure you could get ones that are faster, depending on cost and covid availability.
__________________
My build: The Silver Bullet https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/p...llet-9266.html
Booyah45828 is online now  
Old 08-18-2022, 07:53 AM   #8
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Might be a foot long, but this is very close!

I think I found a model that fits the bill. Bluebird flat nose FE.

It's a 5-window "swing out" (rear axle to rear bumper).
5x29=145 = 12.1' This one is nice because all the windows are the same size.

Total length window count...
14 passenger winders 14x29=406"
door and front cap 30+9=39"
406+39=445"
445/12=37.08'

~~~

At 37' long, I'd have to remove 7' leaving 5' swingout, which is good, but I wanted a 6' swing out.

Not bad.

Does anyone know what model this is? I realize it's flat nose and FE.
Attached Thumbnails
37' 12' swingout.jpg  
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-18-2022, 08:00 AM   #9
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
11r is(was) the standard for quite a few years IMO. A lot of stuff is going to low profile p-metric stuff as of late.

If you need more weight, you can go 12r22.5, but that is a taller and wider tire. A 295/80 would be the same height as an 11r, but wider with another 1500 lbs in weight capacity. If you can go taller, but not wider, you can go with a 24.5 rim and tire. It all depends on the room you have.

Super singles on the front is primarily dump truck/cement truck stuff. Stuff that usually doesn't go over 55 anyways. I'm sure you could get ones that are faster, depending on cost and covid availability.
Sounds like I'd be interested in the 295/60 or /75 as I don't mind losing some ground clearance and might not mind going down to 19.5 wheels for smaller wheels for better overhead clearance.

But can I do that without losing load capacity rating? I like my tires wide and kinda short, and I guess I am not into super singles because I require max road safety even at max highway speed, not just 60mph.

Great tips! Thanks, much appreciated!
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-18-2022, 06:13 PM   #10
Bus Crazy
 
Ronnie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,123
Year: 1971
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: International Loadstar 1700
Engine: 345 international V-8
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeEnergy4All View Post
I think I found a model that fits the bill. Bluebird flat nose FE.

It's a 5-window "swing out" (rear axle to rear bumper).
5x29=145 = 12.1' This one is nice because all the windows are the same size.

Total length window count...
14 passenger winders 14x29=406"
door and front cap 30+9=39"
406+39=445"
445/12=37.08'

~~~

At 37' long, I'd have to remove 7' leaving 5' swingout, which is good, but I wanted a 6' swing out.

Not bad.

Does anyone know what model this is? I realize it's flat nose and FE.



That is going to end really front heavy. Rear engine buses have less swing out and better balance why not use one of them, and not cut it?
Ronnie is offline  
Old 08-18-2022, 07:21 PM   #11
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Posts: 47
Is this a bobbed-bus conversion towing a trailer? What's the importance of the swingout? Is that rear overhang?
La Camioneta is offline  
Old 08-19-2022, 09:12 AM   #12
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: West Ohio
Posts: 3,010
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 1753
Engine: 6.9 International
Rated Cap: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Camioneta View Post
Is this a bobbed-bus conversion towing a trailer? What's the importance of the swingout? Is that rear overhang?
It's not bobbed, he's wanting to do the opposite I think. Swingout is the distance behind the axle that the bumper is. They call it swing out because the bumper actually swings outside of the tire tracks in a turn.

IMO swing out is not important, or even wanted. It's a necessary evil when you have a long length vehicle with a shorter wheel base.

Some folks get stuck on it because they feel they can engineer a system where with the correct swingout distance, the trailer will actually follow in the bus's tracks, making navigating tight areas easier. They never account for trailer sway, and how having a long swingout will always create that, which makes for an unpleasant ride.

More swingout also amplifies any up and down movement experienced, thanks to the leverage effect, every inch the rear axle goes up, the bumper will travel upwards more then an inch, depending on the ratio between wheelbase and the hitch point behind the axle.

The best spot for a hitch point on a vehicle is over the rear axle. That will give you the best ride and best experience. Yes, the trailer will track inside the turn radius of the vehicle when turning, but it's not a big deal. And on a trip, do you spend more time driving straight or turning?
__________________
My build: The Silver Bullet https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/p...llet-9266.html
Booyah45828 is online now  
Old 08-19-2022, 09:19 AM   #13
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Posts: 47
So OP would be better suited with an ex-uhaul type power unit to tow whatever trailer with?
La Camioneta is offline  
Old 08-19-2022, 09:33 AM   #14
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: West Ohio
Posts: 3,010
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 1753
Engine: 6.9 International
Rated Cap: 65
IDK about that. An ex uhaul would have the same issues towing a trailer that a bus would.

If you look at the sketch in the first post, He's trying to build a bus/trailer combo where both units are used as living quarters. Both units will also have slide outs, to double living space as well. So Instead of like most skoolies having 40x8 of living space, he'll have 40x14 in the bus and 30x14 in the trailer for living space.

It's a neat idea, but you'll need a lot of building/fab/welding/engineering experience to build such a rig. And most school buses wouldn't have near enough power to pull such a thing either. Some people complain about lack of power in a bus with only a modest conversion. This thing will be heavy. My suggestion is if you're after so much living space in a mobile environment, google "toter home" and copy one of those designs. Or call one of those manufacturers and have them build you one.
__________________
My build: The Silver Bullet https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/p...llet-9266.html
Booyah45828 is online now  
Old 08-19-2022, 10:11 AM   #15
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
...

Both units will also have slide outs, to double living space as well. So Instead of like most skoolies having (1)40x8 of living space, he'll have 40x14 in the bus and 30x14 in the trailer for living space.

It's a neat idea, but you'll need a lot of building/fab/welding/engineering experience to build such a rig. (2)And most school buses wouldn't have near enough power to pull such a thing either. Some people complain about lack of power in a bus with only a modest conversion. This thing will be heavy. (3)My suggestion is if you're after so much living space in a mobile environment, google "toter home" and copy one of those designs. Or call one of those manufacturers and have them build you one.
1-Actually the bus motorcoach would be 30x14, not 40x14. And the trailer would be 30x16, not 30x14 as you said. Thanks for saying it's a "nice" idea. I think it's a great idea, but to each their own, obviously, you don't clearly understand it yet, so go figure.

2-Not a bad point and I agree. I am shooting for a more powerful engine, and when the drivetrain is upgraded, I'm going with electric for better performance and economy.

3-Too late brother. LOL They stand to learn from me, but you believe what you wish, as I am not designing for racing teams or millionaires but for off-the-grid boondocking, so it's two different goals.

~~~

I am from where these things were originally built a looong time ago, and I have been inspired by them over a decade ago and have been designing similar designs for school buses instead of big trucks.

School buses are better if you reuse the body as I am planning, so there is no reason to convert a big truck, plus school buses come with automatic transmissions while big trucks come with manual unless you're made of money.

The big problem is just getting a bus with a strong enough drivetrain, as you rightly mentioned.
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-19-2022, 10:34 AM   #16
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
(1)It's not bobbed, he's wanting to do the opposite I think. Swingout is the distance behind the axle that the bumper is. They call it swing out because the bumper actually swings outside of the tire tracks in a turn.

(2)IMO swing out is not important, or even wanted. It's a necessary evil when you have a long length vehicle with a shorter wheel base.

(3)Some folks get stuck on it because they feel they can engineer a system where with the correct swingout distance, the trailer will actually follow in the bus's tracks, making navigating tight areas easier. (4)They never account for trailer sway, and how having a long swingout will always create that, which makes for an unpleasant ride.

...

(5)The best spot for a hitch point on a vehicle is over the rear axle. That will give you the best ride and best experience. Yes, the trailer will track inside the turn radius of the vehicle when turning, but it's not a big deal. And on a trip, do you spend more time driving straight or turning?
1-Maybe I don't know what cutting off the tale means, but Bobbing the tale is the plan. I don't know how you get this so wrong, or maybe I don't know what bobbing the tale means, so please explain what bobbing the tale means or accept the fact you have no reason to suggest I am against bobbing the tale.

2-I can't disagree more, but I was a professional truck driver and I understand backing and leverage, so I seem to have an advantage in experience. Having a modest swingout is much better for controlling a trailer than having none. I consider more than just trailer sway but you don't seem to have that skill set yet.

To an extent that you don't allow for, having a reasonable swing out is a blessing for better controlling a trailer and not a necessary evil as you dubiously said.

3-This is rich, you are stuck on zero swing out and I am willing to change my mind based on new improved information. You seem stuck, not others here.

No, I don't wish to have the trailer track in the same track as the motorcoach, that's nearly impossible.

I just wish for the tracking to be better than terrible like if it's attached at the axle, which sadly, is what you suggest and does NOT help when towing the vehicle unless you only care about stabilizing the trailer at max highway speed.

But since I have both a huge and stable towing vehicle, I don't need max towing stability by attaching at the axle and can EASILY deal with a short swingout that has insignificant stability and swingout risks while improving trailer tracking.

I am taking it all into account, not just a few issues you focus on. I am exceptional, you can't get simple things correct, but don't feel too bad about prejudging against me and that I exceed your expectation. I am from the Amish and we excel at not doing what's typical.

4-Simply not true, one can easily consider both "highway trailer sway" and "turning swing out" at the same time. Perhaps that's why we don't see things eye to eye. I do not limit my view to a few ideas but all practical helpful considerations.

5-Totally disagree, and this demonstrates shortsightedness as a modest swingout that does not cause problems with trailer sway helps with trailer tracking that is not available when hitched at the axle. I hope this clarifies.
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-19-2022, 10:55 AM   #17
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Camioneta View Post
Is this a bobbed-bus conversion towing a trailer? What's the importance of the swingout? Is that rear overhang?
Yes, its tale is shortened to allow for increased load rating as the build is heavier than most conversions. But the trailer will also probably be a bus minus the drivetrain and maybe also minus the body. That much has not been determined yet.

"If" I can design and plate a trailer with steerable wheels at low speed then I would be ok with an even shorter swingout/overhang. But so far that seems like a pipe dream. I call the swingout the distance from the axel to the bumper as I said in the original post.

Unless I can build a 30' long trailer with steerable wheels, I require at least a modest swingout on the tow vehicle to help maneuver the trailer around tight offroading or when backing up. Without that overhang, it's much harder to control the trailer, so I require a modest swingout.
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-19-2022, 11:17 AM   #18
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Location: Central Kentucky
Posts: 164
Coachwork: Busless for now
tail, tail, tail
Kentucky Dreaming is online now  
Old 08-19-2022, 11:18 AM   #19
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by La Camioneta View Post
So OP would be better suited with an ex-uhaul type power unit to tow whatever trailer with?
Not a bad idea, and I might reconsider it if it has as much load capacity as a school bus.

I designed this as a mild off-road rig, so I prefer the max ground clearance of a bus compared to a step van. I did not whip up this idea overnight. If the bus is 37' long, then I am bobbing the tale 7 feet shorter, leaving a 5' overhang/swingout.

This gives my build a heavier load capacity than a 30' long bus offers, which is required for my heavier build design. ;)
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Old 08-19-2022, 11:22 AM   #20
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2022
Posts: 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kentucky Dreaming View Post
tail, tail, tail
LOL yes, I am ideally seeking a long tale on a 36' long bus. LOL So I can trim it back short at the tale.

However, it seems like the bus I posted earlier is more like 37' long.

That's probably close enough but wishing for a 36' model with 12' swingout/overhang,, and flat nose front engine.
FreeEnergy4All is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.