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Old 01-02-2019, 09:37 AM   #21
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I wear leather gloves.
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Old 01-02-2019, 07:23 PM   #22
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You must be in a lot of pain. Don't be hard on your self . Accidents do happen to experienced and in-experienced people. I almost never have a guard on because it limits your usage and you cannot see very well with the guard on.
I do use a small lightweight angle grinder and preferable battery operated. They are less powerful and yes it takes a little longer but in most cases when it hangs up it does not rip itself out if your hand.
Get better and I hope they can fix the damage that has been done.

Later j
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Old 01-02-2019, 07:34 PM   #23
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Power tools, and grinders in particular, are dangerous with the guards, they just lesson the damage to non respecting users. Grip the grinder with authority and respect. I've always pulled the guards immediately due to the reasons joeblack stated. I have the scars to show I have learned the respect the hard way. I notice I grip that grinder a bit more than the other tools.
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Old 01-02-2019, 07:46 PM   #24
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I run my guard mainly because even if I grip the grinder hard, ive had cutoff wheels fly apart before... and those pieces flying all over the garage noting the gouges in the guard made me realize those couldve easily been in my shoulder or busted through my plastic face helmet .... there are times that the guard can get in the way but I'll find a way with it on...

-Christopher
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Old 01-02-2019, 08:42 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
I run my guard mainly because even if I grip the grinder hard, ive had cutoff wheels fly apart before... and those pieces flying all over the garage noting the gouges in the guard made me realize those couldve easily been in my shoulder or busted through my plastic face helmet .... there are times that the guard can get in the way but I'll find a way with it on...

-Christopher
Same here.
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Old 01-02-2019, 09:52 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by elliot_peas View Post
I had taken the guard off to remove floor bolts, forgot to put it back on, and was using it overhead to take the ceiling panels down. I lost my grip when it got caught and it landed in my shoulder. Now I might have to sell the bus to pay for the medical bills.

PSA don't be a dumbass like me!


Anyway, do y'all have advice about getting the ceiling panels off without major injuries? Other than "put the guard back on" because I don't think I'll have the arm strength to hold that thing any time soon and also I'm just not ever putting it over my head again. I tried tapping the rivets with a drill and it works for the slightly rusted wall panels but the ceiling enamel makes the drill bit just bounce around. Maybe I can take it off with a wire brush.

Anybody near Asheville want to come give me a hand? I'm scheduling friends as spotters for the next time I pick up a power tool.
so glad you're ok!
and I'm not picking on you... just wanted to get this reminder out there.
If you're ever welding... keep a fire extinguisher nearby and a "fire watcher" if you've got one.
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Old 01-03-2019, 09:53 AM   #27
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Huh. I was using leather because of the sparks & metal shards flying from the grinder. You think nitrile would be a better idea?
Not really, I only mentions that as an example of a glove that will tear easily.

with the proper shields on and aimed correctly, the sparks fly away, it looks impressive but very few if any sparks will touch your hands. If you are close to a wall, the spark may bounce back and that is what you feel. Wear cotton cloths, flannel works good. plastic cloths, ie polyester, nylon etc all melt.

I don't use any gloves.

The worry with leather is that it WON'T tear like skin but will pull your finger, arm whatever into the spinning blade or drill bit and then the glove, being hung up in the blade, will hold your finger there while you naturally thrash around making the wound much worse; maybe even instinctively putting your other hand in trying to pull the first one out.

Also think about where the sparks are going. You hear a lot about welders starting fires. A spark can smolder for a long time before the fire starts. Watch out for saw dust, oil, plywood floor etc. The "spark" is a very small piece of red hot metal, it is still hot after it stops glowing. You wouldn't be the first welder to come back to a job site the next morning and wonder why it burned down. On well run union jobs and government jobs, there is an observer watching for fires and inspecting the site afterwards. You have to do all those things.

I would punch and drill, its slower but everything is lighter and less kinetic. As you work at this for a while you will develop better muscle tone and a more acute sense of what is happening and what is suppose to happen.
It sound like your a little like me, I want to jump to light speed right away and see progress fast.

I have learned that even if I'm just pounding nails, when i start to bend more than I drive, I quit. I have lost my muscle tone; Im tired and out of shape. That is when accidents happen. That is the advantage of working for yourself, you are not a slave to a boss or corporation; when its unsafe - stop- take a break.


oh yea, once you figure out what size drill bit you need, get a dozen in that size.
A machine shop supply store will have them in bulk. Its amazing what a sharp drill bit will do. Sharp tools are safer than dull one and less work.
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Old 01-03-2019, 10:48 AM   #28
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Sorry to hear about your injury. I for sure wouldn't be using an angle grinder on the ceiling unless there was some specific reason that kept the air chisel method from working. And a manual hammer and chisel sounds like way too much work! Let the air do the work!
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Old 01-03-2019, 02:05 PM   #29
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Saying sorry doesn't real help you much Ms elliot but hope you are on the mend now. Looks like an awful gash hiding under that dressing.



Did you get a tetanus shot by the way?


For me the grinder is the right tool for that job with practice of course. Don't be intimidated, figure out what works most comfortably for you.


Don't rush the cutting. Don't work if your arms are tired.

Don't let anything take away your concentration when you go to make the cut.

Scratch that itch before or wipe your brow sweat, get really comfortable in your positioning and stance.

Start on the outside edge where you don't have to reach so much above your head but out in front of your face so you can see what you are doing.
As you move into the centre of the bus, make a platform to raise you up so you work the same manner as on the outside edge.
Try to keep that grinder close to you so eliminate fatigue from holding it and work slow. Let the cutting wheel do its work without forcing it .
Try tight gloves like golf gloves as the grinder will get hot and be hard to hold on to. When it gets to that point, stop and cool it down and rest yourself.
Once you get a nice rhythm going the job will proceed well for you.


I hope you recover and back at it if nobody else can help.

We are all pulling for you, this is one tough tool to master, but you can.


Good luck,


John
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Old 01-03-2019, 03:40 PM   #30
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If your leather gloves are getting caught on angle grinder discs you're holding it wrong and nothing will help you anyhow.
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Old 01-03-2019, 07:11 PM   #31
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Have been doing metal fab work for 40+ years and I have all 10 fingers and toes. Whenever I can (which is almost always) I use the guards that came with the tools always eye protection I was not too good about ear protection until my 50's hence my needing 2 fairly powerful hearing aids.When I raised the roof on my bus I removed the rub rail and forward and rearmost ceiling panel rivets with a 40grit flap disc took almost no time and was a very smooth operation and took two discs and left a nice smooth surface for refinishing.
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Old 01-04-2019, 07:57 AM   #32
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grinders are more dangerous than a loaded gun, i cant believe they are still legal in california.(joke) i've got lots of hours using a grinder and i can say i've had some scary close calls. of all the tools i use its the grinder everytime that gets me, once you get complacent its just there waiting to get you. i see people on youtube with no guard and a weak grip, sometimes no safety glasses. it makes me cringe. its either exploding like a grenade or launching out of your hands.

TLDR ALWAYS USE A GUARD. i know its so impractical sometimes but just do it if at all possible. you can never have enough safety equipment. full face shield, gloves, long sleeves, pants, boots... so sorry this happened to you but its a very good lesson to learn. you're not a wimp use safety equipment. in the long run its going to safe you TIME AND MONEY. its economically intelligent to use as much as you can.
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Old 01-04-2019, 03:52 PM   #33
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instead of resurrecting an old thread...
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/do...der-14446.html
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Old 01-04-2019, 08:37 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elliot_peas View Post
Center punch chisel is a taper I whack with a hammer, right? That sounds helpful. Especially with safety glasses. And maybe chainmail.
Maybe some kind of full faced helmet too? Lol...how many stitches?
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Old 01-09-2019, 06:54 PM   #35
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Grinders

If your buying cheap knock off blades from a Bargain store (HF) be aware there is no quality control and at high speed the blades blow apart “buyer beware”.
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:03 PM   #36
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If your buying cheap knock off blades from a Bargain store (HF) be aware there is no quality control and at high speed the blades blow apart “buyer beware”.
Had one explode on me that was bought cheap..glad your ok
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:28 PM   #37
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If you insist on using really cheap cutoff blades...at least spend some money on really good face shields & gloves.


That said..even the "good" blades can and do come apart from time to time.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:19 PM   #38
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I cut a ton of steel on my roof raise project. All cheap HF cutoff wheels used correctly. I always cut metal with gloves and a full face shield. None exploded though. I used em down to the wear line.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:31 PM   #39
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They have a wear line???? I just know the 4" discs don't cut worth a damn once they are down to about a 1/4" from the hub. I've never been bit by a grinder--but then there is always sheet metal. Cut a tendon in your finger and it rolls up like a cheap window shade BTDT.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:34 PM   #40
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I'm in Asheville if ya wanna meet up and talk buses n power tools. =)
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