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Old 11-26-2017, 04:57 PM   #21
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I'm planning a 1000# motorcycle lift on either the front or back. The Yamaha weighs around 650# and I want to be able to carry it.
Luckily for me, mine is 400. I came across this video that you might find interesting, cause I like how she retrofitted the lift. I don't know if you've seen it.

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Old 11-26-2017, 05:30 PM   #22
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I was hoping for a feedback on my layout as to whether or not it will work. Any takers? With the loss of 66 inches for the bike and another 74 inches for the bed, that leave me with 13 ft 4 inches to play with. This is one of two setups for the front half. If you take a look at the 1st picture you can see an outline of the closet I want to put in. It juts out 3 ft from the wall to give some privacy to the back. They are taken from the front and the back of the bus. I like how the couch is setup, but I have to deal with the front wheelwells. The couch can deal with one side, but the other side is a different thing. This was the reason I was asking whether the front wheelwells could disappear. When I saw the pictures of the bus and seeing it was flat in the back, I thought it was the same in the front. Imagine my surprise when it wasn't. In front of the couch it's clear. The only other thing will be the kitchen.
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Old 11-26-2017, 06:44 PM   #23
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Does that still have the metal ceiling panels in it?

Your layout will primarily be determined by your tanks and plumbing. The rest of it seems to fall into place after that.

We all work on buses with the same general purpose yet they all turn out differently.
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Old 11-26-2017, 06:53 PM   #24
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Does that still have the metal ceiling panels in it?

Your layout will primarily be determined by your tanks and plumbing. The rest of it seems to fall into place after that.

We all work on buses with the same general purpose yet they all turn out differently.
I know that each bus is different, but this is my attempt on something major, especially when it comes to the design that no one has ever seen before. I think. I got the layout from an Italian website.
Just started with the flooring, luckily there all phillips screws as far as I can tell. Some has come out easily, some are just turning nothing else, and the rest are stripped so far.
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Old 11-26-2017, 07:39 PM   #25
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It's considered lucky to get a, pardon the expression, screwed bus rather than a riveted bus. I have no comparison since I've only done a riveted bus. Panel removal seems like it's a PITA either way.

You shouldn't worry about your floorplan to much at this point because you'll change plans to make things fit as your build progresses. Think of your floorplans as a general guideline.
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Old 11-26-2017, 07:55 PM   #26
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It's considered lucky to get a, pardon the expression, screwed bus rather than a riveted bus. I have no comparison since I've only done a riveted bus. Panel removal seems like it's a PITA either way.

You shouldn't worry about your floorplan to much at this point because you'll change plans to make things fit as your build progresses. Think of your floorplans as a general guideline.
I agree with you on that part. Like I said earlier, the layout is based off of something that was 10 ft wide not 7.5. But I can always hope, but be prepared anyways. Your right about the "screwed" part. After the misinformation I got from the seller saying it was a cummins and then finding out it was a caterpillar (which luckily it's in good shape), I'm glad I've got screws. I'm on my own when it comes to this, but that's ok. I'm going to school while I'm working on it. So it will be a slow process.
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Old 11-26-2017, 08:55 PM   #27
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It's considered lucky to get a, pardon the expression, screwed bus rather than a riveted bus. I have no comparison since I've only done a riveted bus. Panel removal seems like it's a PITA either way.

You shouldn't worry about your floorplan to much at this point because you'll change plans to make things fit as your build progresses. Think of your floorplans as a general guideline.
Thomas use screws instead of rivets, for the most part.

Along with their 78" ceilings in most (but not all), just another good reason to like them.
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Old 11-26-2017, 08:57 PM   #28
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Thomas use screws instead of rivets, for the most part.

Along with their 78" ceilings in most (but not all), just another good reason to like them.
I so lucked out. I've seen how much a pain in the arse to deal with rivets.
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Old 11-26-2017, 09:09 PM   #29
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I so lucked out. I've seen how much a pain in the arse to deal with rivets.
An Air-Hammer is your friend. Center punch all the rivets with a pointy chisel, then go round with a sharp flat chisel.

What went in, will come out!
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Old 11-26-2017, 09:14 PM   #30
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What's a couple thousand rivets on a hot summer day? I'd have rather been at the swimming hole honestly. Screws are good if they aren't stripped, otherwise they're kind of like rivets too.

My bus lost nearly a ton by taking out the interior steel ceiling and wall panels.
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Old 11-26-2017, 09:45 PM   #31
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Once the flooring has been removed and depending on how rusty it is and dealing with it. What would do you suggest in insulating floor? And what about the walls and ceiling? Spray foam or the other stuff? I know spray foam is more expensive but doesn't have a better R factor?
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Old 11-26-2017, 10:15 PM   #32
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That's a very old argument on this site. Foam versus panels.

I used spray foam, but I can't imagine cutting panels would be substantially more work and it would certainly be cheaper to use panels. If I do the insulation process again I'll use panels. The foam was a pretty labor intensive process in my case as well as being expensive. Lots of mess and cleanup with the foam too.

I just wasn't that impressed with the foam.
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Old 11-26-2017, 10:45 PM   #33
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That's a very old argument on this site. Foam versus panels.

I used spray foam, but I can't imagine cutting panels would be substantially more work and it would certainly be cheaper to use panels. If I do the insulation process again I'll use panels. The foam was a pretty labor intensive process in my case as well as being expensive. Lots of mess and cleanup with the foam too.

I just wasn't that impressed with the foam.
Ok what about the floor? Do use you tyvek for the flour?
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Old 11-26-2017, 10:48 PM   #34
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Ok what about the floor? Do use you tyvek for the flour?
Sheet foam and plywood.

You can frame out the floor if you want, or simply have a fully floating floor. Glue the foam board down then glue plywood on top. It will be quite strong enough to take the screws that frame out the walls, etc. 5/8ths or 3/4" ply will work.

The floor doesn't need a vapor barrier, it already has one.
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Old 11-26-2017, 11:07 PM   #35
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Sheet foam and plywood.

You can frame out the floor if you want, or simply have a fully floating floor. Glue the foam board down then glue plywood on top. It will be quite strong enough to take the screws that frame out the walls, etc. 5/8ths or 3/4" ply will work.

The floor doesn't need a vapor barrier, it already has one.
Which would be better?
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Old 11-26-2017, 11:18 PM   #36
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Which would be better?
Which what?

If you are asking about framing ... I don't think it necessary and I won't frame out my floor. Others prefer to frame the floor and cut the foam board to fit. Everyone who insulates the floor uses foam board, it's designed for the job.

A few hardy souls have spray-foamed the underside of the floor, but that has some issues.

Oh, I'll use 3/4 ply for the floor. It's a bit heavier, and costs a little more, but with no framing it provides a better foundation for screwing into.
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Old 11-26-2017, 11:53 PM   #37
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I had planned to spray under the floor initially but have since changed my mind. The foam I have seems to shrink and expand based on temperatures. To me that means spray foam under the floor would eventually work loose and even drop off. Yes, I could attach wire to the underside of the floor to help retain the foam, but that's when it starts getting to complicated and defeats the purpose of the bus. Simply put, if it's cold, drive South..

If I was headed up to AK I might still try under floor insulation, but AK is currently only a summer destination in my opinion.
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Old 11-27-2017, 03:23 AM   #38
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That's a very old argument on this site. Foam versus panels.

I used spray foam, but I can't imagine cutting panels would be substantially more work and it would certainly be cheaper to use panels. If I do the insulation process again I'll use panels. The foam was a pretty labor intensive process in my case as well as being expensive. Lots of mess and cleanup with the foam too.

I just wasn't that impressed with the foam.
I like your honesty, man!
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Old 12-02-2017, 07:42 AM   #39
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I've got a question that I've tried to find out on my own, but with questionable results. Can you use kitchen appliances that are meant for a stationary home in a skoolie that's setup for boondocking?
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Old 12-02-2017, 10:43 AM   #40
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I've got a question that I've tried to find out on my own, but with questionable results. Can you use kitchen appliances that are meant for a stationary home in a skoolie that's setup for boondocking?
Brief answer is "Yes".

Generally you will want smaller appliances. You are fitting out a "Tiny house" not a McMansion.

Fridge: The biggie, because of the power requirements. Modern domestic fridges are super-efficient and demand much less power than the usual "RV" fridge that runs on 12/120V. It's because they work in a completely different way. Try a Magic Chef od around 10 cu foot capacity and run it from your inverter. Power consumption is very modest, but still large compared with most electrical you use. RV makers are now, by and large, fitting domestic fridges in their units. There are some marine fridges that are very efficient, but they also cost a fortune. There is little to be gained by fitting a chest-style fridge either.

Microwave .... You will want a lower powered mw. Even then it will require a decently large inverter and battery bank to run, or a small generator.

Stove ... I'd go for a smaller domestic stove, or cooktop and oven, that can run on propane out of the box. I plan on using propane for cooking and water heating, and for a barbeque with an external propane skin fitting. That is, you plug the BBQ into the bus to use it.

Those are the major appliances. There are other ways to do this, but broadly that's what I am looking at doing.

Bear size in mind. You have to get them into the bus.
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