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Old 12-15-2022, 09:33 AM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Question Waterproofing Question

From the research I've done it suggests getting the bus's outside finished first so that it is water tight. Do I need to precut holes for the mini-split, woodstove, electrical... etc. before starting on the inside?

I have not purchased those big ticket items yet so I am not sure of the dimensions I would need to precut if that is what is recommended.

Also my wife recommends I plug our Instagram whenever I post something so people can follow along if they want to on our Double Decker Bus Build: Double_Decked_Out

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Old 12-15-2022, 10:14 AM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
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It's certainly wise to make sure the exterior is watertight, so nothing gets damaged during your build. But you can always cut hatch, vent, pipe openings later and on seal them properly. Generally, you'd sand down to metal and seal the flanges with something good, like 3M 5200 or 4200 or some of the Sika products...anything but silicone. Then you can cover that with the same product you put on the roof (like TropiCool or whatever you're using).
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Old 12-15-2022, 10:56 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double_Decked_Out View Post
Also my wife recommends I plug our Instagram whenever I post something so people can follow along if they want to on our Double Decker Bus Build: Double_Decked_Out
I'm not sure how many users here actually go looking at Instagram, Youtube or Facebook accounts, but probably some do - almost certainly not enough to boost your viewer counts significantly. You could save yourself some typing and put the links in your signature (which is added to the bottom of all of your posts automatically).
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Old 12-15-2022, 11:06 AM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Oh thanks, I'll start doing that instead of typing it out like that.
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Old 12-15-2022, 11:08 AM   #5
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rossvtaylor View Post
It's certainly wise to make sure the exterior is watertight, so nothing gets damaged during your build. But you can always cut hatch, vent, pipe openings later and on seal them properly. Generally, you'd sand down to metal and seal the flanges with something good, like 3M 5200 or 4200 or some of the Sika products...anything but silicone. Then you can cover that with the same product you put on the roof (like TropiCool or whatever you're using).
Thank you! That will help save some money not buying everything all at once
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Old 12-24-2022, 03:51 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rossvtaylor View Post
It's certainly wise to make sure the exterior is watertight, so nothing gets damaged during your build. But you can always cut hatch, vent, pipe openings later and on seal them properly. Generally, you'd sand down to metal and seal the flanges with something good, like 3M 5200 or 4200 or some of the Sika products...anything but silicone. Then you can cover that with the same product you put on the roof (like TropiCool or whatever you're using).
Just just want to say Amen to the, " anything but silicone" comment. Absolutely nothing sticks to silicone except silicone.
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Old 12-24-2022, 03:55 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rossvtaylor View Post
It's certainly wise to make sure the exterior is watertight, so nothing gets damaged during your build. But you can always cut hatch, vent, pipe openings later and on seal them properly. Generally, you'd sand down to metal and seal the flanges with something good, like 3M 5200 or 4200 or some of the Sika products...anything but silicone. Then you can cover that with the same product you put on the roof (like TropiCool or whatever you're using).
what do you think/know about lexel?
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Old 12-26-2022, 01:10 AM   #8
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Yes you should definitely get your waterproofing done as far as you can. I am a big fan of keeping the factory bus windows, I like the light and fresh air provided and can deal with the heat lose and am not ashamed of my school bus heritage Lol. I removed and cleaned all window frames before stripping and reprinting them then reset them in polyurethane (good enough for car windshields) Good adhesion and elasticity. Another area of the window to consider a leak source is the seal between the glass and aluminum. Ok so now you think you've got your windows all sealed up and the very next rain you've got water on the windows and floor, maybe it's not the window after all that's leaking and it's time to start looking up. The riveted body seams on the roof can dry out and crack from the body flexing and leak with that water running down your hat channels and pooling on your windows (ask me how I know this) these seams can be cleaned out from the roof and re-sealed with automotive seam sealer then painted and coated with your preferred roof coating, I prefer Dicor sealant as the final top coat on seams, hatch's and such. Two years on the West coast of British Columbia, so pretty much a rain forest and holding strong(fingers crossed)
Good luck, safe travels
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