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Old 10-10-2021, 10:29 PM   #21
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Years ago, I found the Material Safety Data Sheet for WD-40. Unlike nowadays, it was possible to understand it.
Cannot find it now -- I think I lost it in a hard drive crash.

But WD-40 is essentially 85 percent kerosene and 15 percent sewing machine oil.

Less flippantly, 85 percent a solvent very similar to kerosene, and 15 percent a light lubricating oil.

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Old 10-11-2021, 11:03 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by adic27 View Post
I was reading up on a few reddit posts about how WD-40 being a lubricant is misleading or not really true. I'm sure you can use it to lubricate some things but read that it should be followed up with some oil otherwise it anything that can rust will, eventually?

I just cleaned where my last driveshaft piece connects to the pumpkin and was wondering, does this part get greased by the grease that's inside the u joint or should I rub grease on it in certain places before connecting it.

I sprayed brake cleaner on it not realizing the rubber piece (see image). I sprayed WD-40 on the whole area after blowing it dry with compressed air. Should I put oil on the rubber? If so, can it be any oil? I have a gallon of oil leftover from when I changed the oil.

Thanks
The original WD-40 is not and has never been intended for use as a general-purpose lubricant. It was developed as a treatment for the outside metal surfaces of missiles to prevent corrosion. It is supposed to dry and leave a film that prevents moisture from attacking the metal. That film also attracts and traps dust, which is also why you should never use it to lubricate locks. It will simply gum things up and ruin the lock. Want a lubricant? Use something that is labelled as a lubricant. I use WD-40 to coat anything that I don't want to be ruined by corrosion, like the entire engine.

The company that makes WD-40 has finally reacted to all the criticism and turned "WD-40" into a brand name. They also sell products under their brand name that ARE lubricants, but you are required to exert your brain to do something too many people find impossible to do: READ the label.
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Old 10-13-2021, 03:07 PM   #23
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I recommend something called Blaster instead of wd for lubrication...it's much better.
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Old 10-13-2021, 03:56 PM   #24
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I recommend something called Blaster instead of wd for lubrication...it's much better.
Instead of looking for brand names, look for the ingredients on the label.
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Old 10-15-2021, 04:37 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by dognamedboo View Post
...WD was the 40th attempt at making a Water Displacement formula. It's really thin as an oil and disappears pretty quick...
.
Agreed.
As a kid, I sprayed WD-40 on fishing reels, then noticed a gummy residue as the carrier evaporated.
That residue interfered with the reel operation, and was an all-around bad idea.
.
The 'water displacement' formula was developed decades ago.
In the decades since, we developed specific lubricants to fit individual requirements for shear resistance, heat-tolerance, and corrosion prevention.
.
If moisture in your distributor cap is preventing your spark-plugs from firing (or firing in the correct order), a 'water displacement' spray might get you moving again.
Or wipe around the contacts with a paper-towel.
Or just wave a warm hair-dryer at it.
.
On computer-controlled or diesel engines, WD-40 is an anachronism.
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