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Old 05-30-2022, 11:40 PM   #1
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What Type Framing Screws?

What kind of screws are you guys using to attach wood framing to the metal ribs of the bus? There are so many options of head design like a typical v head wood screw, a pan head, heads with washers, etc. Then the thread style and pitch, coarse and fine, self drilling, ??? Any suggestions and why you chose that style would be awesome! Thanks!

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Old 05-31-2022, 08:03 AM   #2
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I have a riv-nut tool. Would a nut insert and panhead style bolt grip and hold better than a sheet metal style thread?
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Old 05-31-2022, 08:36 AM   #3
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Wood to Metal framing screws

#12 x 2-1/2" Reamer Tek Star/Torx T-30 Screw Head Self-Drilling Wood to Metal Screws for Flatbeds, Trailers, or for Fastening Wood to Steel

Check out the recently updated thread (link below) regarding the same question.

https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f10/f...rips-5121.html
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Old 05-31-2022, 09:10 AM   #4
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^^^^^^ What DeMac said ^^^^^


Just make sure to measure the screw and the combined depth you need to sink them to, and choose the appropriate length fasteners. Different manufacturers of the same style appear to make different lengths, so sometimes you need to shop across brands. As the threads end well before the drilling end of the screw, you gotta be sure you've chosen a length that goes far enough to engage the threads fully into the metal you're screwing into, but not so far that the tip of the screw hits whatever is behind it (which could cause you to either drill through the exterior of the bus, or create a 'stop' that destroys the threads you just made). Longer screws are kind of a pain to get started (for me), so in those cases pilot holes in the wood aren't a bad idea.
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Old 05-31-2022, 11:10 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by TheHubbardBus View Post
^^^^^^ What DeMac said ^^^^^


Just make sure to measure the screw and the combined depth you need to sink them to, and choose the appropriate length fasteners. Different manufacturers of the same style appear to make different lengths, so sometimes you need to shop across brands. As the threads end well before the drilling end of the screw, you gotta be sure you've chosen a length that goes far enough to engage the threads fully into the metal you're screwing into, but not so far that the tip of the screw hits whatever is behind it (which could cause you to either drill through the exterior of the bus, or create a 'stop' that destroys the threads you just made). Longer screws are kind of a pain to get started (for me), so in those cases pilot holes in the wood aren't a bad idea.
-------------------

Yes. All that.



Measure the each section of the shank to ensure that the threads are gripping, not too far. Check a couple sizes if you must.

Definitely predrill the wood or the threads will act as a screw-conveyor, lifting the wood away from the surface. (breaks tips, too)

I also, predrilled pilot holes into the ribs, through the wood beam. (Cutting oil is ok w/wood) Clamps and a partner make it all possible.
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Old 05-31-2022, 01:41 PM   #6
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Thanks for the advice! Any advice for orientation of the wall framing (verticle or horizontal)?
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Old 05-31-2022, 03:53 PM   #7
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I attached wood to the ribs in two different ways. Like DeMac, I ran the 3/4" furring strips on my ceiling front-to-back and screwed them directly to the ribs with Teks wood-to-metal screws. For the walls, I screwed c-brackets to the back of 2" deep pieces of 2X4 using wood screws, then the c-brackets fit over the ribs and I attached them with Teks self-drilling sheet metal screws run into the sides of the ribs. The force on the Teks screws in this case is all shear - no force acting to pull these screws out of the ribs. Does it matter? Probably not and it's certainly more work to do it this way.
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Old 01-16-2024, 03:16 PM   #8
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When I had to fix wood to metal in my project, I used self-drilling screws with a flat, round top. These are super handy because you don't need to drill holes first – they do it as you screw them in. This saved me a lot of time.

I chose screws with more extensive, rough threads since they stick better to the metal, especially when the wood is soft. It's essential to pick the suitable screws so everything stays put. I buy my screws from a High Tensile Fasteners manufacturer because their stuff is strong and lasts a long time. You want screws that can handle being screwed into metal, and these high-strength screws are perfect for that.
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Old 01-16-2024, 09:44 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeMac View Post
-------------------

Yes. All that.



Measure the each section of the shank to ensure that the threads are gripping, not too far. Check a couple sizes if you must.

Definitely predrill the wood or the threads will act as a screw-conveyor, lifting the wood away from the surface. (breaks tips, too)

I also, predrilled pilot holes into the ribs, through the wood beam. (Cutting oil is ok w/wood) Clamps and a partner make it all possible.




i had trouble with the wings on these screws enlarging the steel channel and the threads not engauging. went up 1 size (in diameter) and ground the wings off. i predrilled the wood but not the channel.this is where 2 drill/drivers are handy. i also used sill insulation behind all wood to metal contact points.
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Old 01-16-2024, 09:48 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bridg73988 View Post
I have a riv-nut tool. Would a nut insert and panhead style bolt grip and hold better than a sheet metal style thread?
these are good til they spin. when i use these i put a couple of tac welds on each other. sorry but i had a few bad experiences with these to use without the welder
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Old 01-17-2024, 05:46 AM   #11
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i predrilled the wood but not the channel
I had to do the same to get these to work properly. Without a predrilled hole in the wood (wider in diameter than the threads), the screw would bite the wood and force it away from the channel rather than digging into the metal. I also countersunk the predrilled holes for good measure to prevent the furring strips from splitting.
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