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Old 09-24-2021, 11:20 AM   #1
Skoolie
 
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Year: 1995
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What's in your kitchen cabinets?

Skoolie fam!
Getting ready to set out on 1 year of full-time road livin' in about 50 days.
Thinking about our plates, drinking glasses, and mugs banging around in the cabinets only to open the door to find a pile of broken glass.

I'm curious, what do you all use to eat on / with? Wood? Plastic? Is glass not that big of a problem if secured?

Cheers, see you on the road!

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Old 09-24-2021, 11:25 AM   #2
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I use plastic or stainless steel for everything. But I'm just a weekend warrior. Full-timing you might wanna use the real stuff sometimes.

Vaccuum insulated stainless keeps your hot chocolate warm all morning too.
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Old 09-24-2021, 11:46 AM   #3
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I’ve used normal (ceramic?) plates and they’re mostly fine. Not going to say they won’t get chipped here and there but I’m not careful. Glasses have also been fine with the exception of wine glasses. They need special care. I made a hanging rack after I am mostly parked but they wouldn’t survive that either.

I hate plastic so my suggested alternative is the enamel coated camping plates and bowls, but I dislike drinking coffee out of anything other than traditional coffee mug and they’ve given me no issues at all.

Hope that makes some sense, too tired to edit.
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Old 09-24-2021, 12:27 PM   #4
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I’ve used normal (ceramic?) plates and they’re mostly fine. Not going to say they won’t get chipped here and there but I’m not careful. Glasses have also been fine with the exception of wine glasses. They need special care. I made a hanging rack after I am mostly parked but they wouldn’t survive that either.

I hate plastic so my suggested alternative is the enamel coated camping plates and bowls, but I dislike drinking coffee out of anything other than traditional coffee mug and they’ve given me no issues at all.

Hope that makes some sense, too tired to edit.
Haha totally makes sense, thank you! Glad to hear ceramic is working out for you - I also dislike plastic for eating or drinking, and metal isn't much better.
I'm thinking with some rubberized cabinet mats for cusion and grip, I might be able to get away with a few ceramic plates and glasses for drinking.
Maybe I'll add rubber dividers in the cabinet keep everything from sliding into eachother....hmmm
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Old 09-24-2021, 12:31 PM   #5
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I think the rubberized mats are a great idea. My stuff would slide around a bit and probably caused most of the problems I have had and I was thinking of doing that but I ended up parked for the time being.
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Old 09-24-2021, 01:59 PM   #6
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I have square wooden plates made from acacia wood that I'm going to be using in my bus. Everybody I know freaks out at the thought of wooden plates but they think nothing of eating cheese and whatnot off of cutting boards. I plan on getting some wooden bowls and goblets as well.
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Old 09-24-2021, 02:53 PM   #7
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I have square wooden plates made from acacia wood that I'm going to be using in my bus. Everybody I know freaks out at the thought of wooden plates but they think nothing of eating cheese and whatnot off of cutting boards. I plan on getting some wooden bowls and goblets as well.
We're going wood if the dishes we have don't work out. Any brand or style you can recommend over others?

We have some pretty sturdy drinking glasses (thanks mom!) that come with lids! Double as some pretty great storage containers for leftovers. I think they will stand up fine on their own - nice wide base and bottom-heavy.
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Old 09-24-2021, 03:50 PM   #8
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All my stuff is stainless steel, except the wooden chopsticks, and the glass cutting board. All lightweight thin-metal backpacker's stuff, except the silverware and cutting board. Pots are the size of a small bowl. Perfect for one person. Except I have a 2-gallon stew-pot with a fry-pan lid that is still light enough to backpack with. (although some millennial that I went on a beach-campout with used the fry-pan over a big, hot fire, only heating one side, and warped it pretty good. city girls with electric stoves..... Heating it back up mostly fixed it, but not perfect.)
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Old 09-24-2021, 05:18 PM   #9
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We stored ours on an open shelf above the sink. The dishes were held in place with 4 dowels drilled into the shelf around the perimeter of each stack of dishes (saucers, bowls and plates) to keep them from shifting. We put a layer of that rubberized shelf liner in between each dish or bowl. Our glasses were pint sized Mason jars and, while driving, they were screwed into their caps that were attached to the shelf and while stationary they set upright into the caps. We never broke one dish in our 2 years of travel. A similar setup could probably be done in cabinets or you could probably get by with the rubber shelf liner between dishes in secured cabinets.
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Old 09-24-2021, 07:21 PM   #10
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We're going wood if the dishes we have don't work out. Any brand or style you can recommend over others?
I dunno, I bought my plates at a store in Ann Arbor 25 years ago and they don't have any brand on the back (they just say "acacia" lol). These plates from Pacific Merchants seem exactly the same, though.

I've never done anything other than wash them with soap and water and dry them right away, no tongue oil or anything like that. They're a little scratched from two decades of use, of course, but otherwise they seem completely indestructible, and they look pretty cool as well.
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Old 09-24-2021, 07:52 PM   #11
Skoolie
 
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We stored ours on an open shelf above the sink. The dishes were held in place with 4 dowels drilled into the shelf around the perimeter of each stack of dishes (saucers, bowls and plates) to keep them from shifting. We put a layer of that rubberized shelf liner in between each dish or bowl. Our glasses were pint sized Mason jars and, while driving, they were screwed into their caps that were attached to the shelf and while stationary they set upright into the caps. We never broke one dish in our 2 years of travel. A similar setup could probably be done in cabinets or you could probably get by with the rubber shelf liner between dishes in secured cabinets.
Love the dowel idea, like a little stand for the dish to sit in The mason jar idea is genius also, love that they screw into place to keep them from shifting around - I can definitely replicate this with our glasses.
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Old 09-24-2021, 07:53 PM   #12
Skoolie
 
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I dunno, I bought my plates at a store in Ann Arbor 25 years ago and they don't have any brand on the back (they just say "acacia" lol). These plates from Pacific Merchants seem exactly the same, though.

I've never done anything other than wash them with soap and water and dry them right away, no tongue oil or anything like that. They're a little scratched from two decades of use, of course, but otherwise they seem completely indestructible, and they look pretty cool as well.
Thanks for the link! They are some great looking plates - we might go this route and just pack up the stone wear / ceramic plates that we have.
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Old 09-25-2021, 07:41 AM   #13
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I think in our first bus, we used regular old Corell ware, same stuff we still use in our home. Not 100% unbreakable, but darn near. I don't remember what we used for drinking. You can fully stock your kitchen wares with yard sale stuff, less painful to toss what does break, there's almost always a yard sale near where ever you are to replace things. We try to avoid using disposable stuff.
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Old 09-25-2021, 08:42 AM   #14
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I think in our first bus, we used regular old Corell ware, same stuff we still use in our home. Not 100% unbreakable, but darn near. I don't remember what we used for drinking. You can fully stock your kitchen wares with yard sale stuff, less painful to toss what does break, there's almost always a yard sale near where ever you are to replace things. We try to avoid using disposable stuff.
x2 on the Corelle. It's a very good option if you want "normal" dishware. I think it's some form of tempered glass, so it holds up better than regular ceramic while being much thinner and lighter. We took our hand-me-down Corelle on on our first bus and had no broken dishes in 2 years of very rough driving.

The dishes lived on a metal shelf and for some reason we never figured out the trick of putting that non-slip rubbery stuff between each dish. That experience revealed the downside to Corelle - it can be very loud, and in a ringy way that my ears found especially aggravating. It's a good option, but I think this next time around we'll be trying out some form of wood/bamboo like MG suggested to minimize the overall sound volume when driving on washboards.
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Old 09-25-2021, 01:37 PM   #15
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Tejon and BarnYardCamp, thanks for thr info! I did not know about the Corelle dishware, or didn't realize the difference. Good to know to keep an eye out for that!

And amen to no disposable dishware, I'm already burning diesel all over the country, I want to keep the rest of my footprint as small as possible
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Old 09-25-2021, 01:57 PM   #16
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That experience revealed the downside to Corelle - it can be very loud, and in a ringy way that my ears found especially aggravating.
Interesting. I'm amazed at how stable the middle of my bus rides (as opposed to the overhangs). All my stainless steel cookware/plates/cups/water-bottles are in piles in two boxes on shelves. I assumed they would drive me crazy, but I never hear them. Not at all.


The old metal-frame bunk-bed squeaked like mad. That's gone.
The wheelchair lift in so many public buses I've ridden in is so loud. Mine is quiet, even when it looses pressure and gets floppy; I don't hear it. The sheets of galvanized metal stored behind the lift don't make noise.
The cover for the in-dash heater vibrated like mad, but a piece of self-adhesive window-sealing foam stopped that.
Now my double-door is vibrating, and from what I can tell, it's the arm. Hmmm....how to fix that.
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Old 09-25-2021, 03:02 PM   #17
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Now my double-door is vibrating, and from what I can tell, it's the arm. Hmmm....how to fix that.
Wasn't that problem solved by the burned up transmission? No drive = no vibrate, right?

*sorry if it's too soon to joke about the tranny
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Old 09-29-2021, 05:34 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Tejon7 View Post
Wasn't that problem solved by the burned up transmission? No drive = no vibrate, right?

*sorry if it's too soon to joke about the tranny
took a minute, but I thought it was funny
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Old 09-30-2021, 01:27 PM   #19
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: Baja often, Oregon frequently
Posts: 167
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Our hot little hands...
Chassis: Ford CF8000 ExpeditionVehicle
Engine: Cummins 505ci mechanical
We trudge up rough logger tracks to remote mountain lakes and across deserts to isolated Baja beaches.
None of our stuff gets 'babied'; if it works, we keep it.
.
During our early years, we learned a lot by joining caravans of experienced travelers, always listening and observing, rarely speaking.
.
* Beverages -- an eccentric collection of stainless-steel mugs acquired second-hand for a buck apiece.
* Dishes -- mis-matched ceramic, acquired new from some independent Dollar-type store someplace (Billings? Bozeman?).
.
* Cooking -- cast-iron exclusively, some antique, some this century then polished to a mirror with a metal 60-grit on the orbital.
(Anytime we snag a nail, we 'shop' for a Lodge skillet to file it back to flush (Lodge makes an impressive weapon against the likes of BigFoot or Godzilla, but other than that...)).
(We are convinced Lodge charges by the ton.)
(And how much effort would it take for Lodge to polish their cooking surfaces just a little; the darn stuff is coarse as a frost-heaved salted road in Minnesota!)
.
For browning ground meats, we prefer a Dutch oven.
Tall sides contain pops, simplifying clean-up.
After the meat is browned, it transfers to a holding mug.
While warm, that filthy disgusting Dutch oven gets the water to boil for noodles -- we like garbonzo flour or chia flour noodles.
Drained, the noodles and beef is mingled (aka 'co-mingled') in the Dutch, sauce added, then famished forks dig-in communally.
[smiling just thinking about it!]
.
The Dutch works for a quick-warm of zoodles for spaghetti, too.
.
At a small independent resellers shop a couple-three decades ago (in Apache Junction?), we found some new-in-wrapper stumpy-fat quart-size stainless-steel 'lunch' jugs with wide-mouth screw-off tops.
After hauling them all over tarnation, we finally found a use for them:
We soak our rare oatmeal in hot water overnight in the jugs... inventively named our 'brunchers'.
.
Our oatmeal-ish recipe:
The evening prior to TheMainEvent, we add a tiny splash of vinegar to the boiling water to break-down the phytates/phytic acid in the grain.
How much water?
The amount normally used (aka 'exact same') to cook it from cold in the morning.
Next morn about brunch-time, the screw-off top is lifted to reveal... nicely-soaked oatmeal completely cooked and ready for browned seasoned ground meat... our version of haggis.
Other than this, we avoid grains and legumes.
.
* Utensils -- stainless-steel, each set-up stored in our 'owned' mugs.
Each of us normally uses one fork for meats and chopped vegetables, one honking spoon for stews or stirring tea and smoothies.
(Apparently, this's different from every YouTube tour of every van-conversion: "And here is our utensils drawer where we store our utensils when we are not using our utensils.")
(I know, I know... we need to 'get with the program'.)
.
.
Each individual is responsible for retrieving their individual 'owned' drink/eat equipment, using it, worshing it, then putting it back some place they can remember.
It may not always happen with this precision, but it is a nice goal irregardless.
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Old 09-30-2021, 04:54 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tejon7 View Post
Wasn't that problem solved by the burned up transmission? No drive = no vibrate, right?

*sorry if it's too soon to joke about the tranny
It's worse at idle. (the resonation frequency)



I'm still driving, just slowly. (or even more slowly than before) Slow to accelerate, top speed is down to about 40-45 these days, from 55 last month, and 75 when all was good. But still movin'!


your joke is all in good fun! no worries!
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