Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-13-2020, 02:39 AM   #1
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,544
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Oops, that load was not secured!

My wife ran across this video from 10-10-2020 where a semi rear-ended another semi and his load shifted right through the engine!


https://m.facebook.com/1000031507808...1985192916475/
Native is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2020, 02:43 AM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
CHEESE_WAGON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,474
Year: None
Coachwork: None
Chassis: None
Engine: None
Rated Cap: None
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
My wife ran across this video from 10-10-2020 where a semi rear-ended another semi and his load shifted right through the engine!


https://m.facebook.com/1000031507808...1985192916475/
Every trucker's nightmare. Much more common with open-deck (flatbed) loads than anything else. In fact, we call rolls of steel sheeting chained down with the ability to roll the length of the bed 'suicide' loading because it's so easy for the roll to break loose and just roll right through the back of the truck cab on heavy braking. And it WILL kill the driver.

I've seen my share of this sort of thing, though I was fortunate enough that it never happened to me. Mostly because I did my job, made sure the load was secured properly, did my required inspections and checklists, and didn't roll with equipment that was questionable. Probably pissed off a lot of dispatchers, shippers and receivers, but I probably saved a lot of lives, too.
__________________
"Cheese Wagon" <anomaly.va@gmail.com>

Former owner - 1989 Ford B700 64-pass Blue Bird (Rest In Peace, Cheese Wagon)
CHEESE_WAGON is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2020, 04:55 AM   #3
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 3,544
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Did you notice that the rebar went under the driver's seat and between his legs?


It is amazing nobody got hurt.
Native is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2020, 05:02 AM   #4
Bus Crazy
 
CHEESE_WAGON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,474
Year: None
Coachwork: None
Chassis: None
Engine: None
Rated Cap: None
Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
Did you notice that the rebar went under the driver's seat and between his legs?

It is amazing nobody got hurt.
Yurp... Driver needs to buy a lottery ticket IMO.
__________________
"Cheese Wagon" <anomaly.va@gmail.com>

Former owner - 1989 Ford B700 64-pass Blue Bird (Rest In Peace, Cheese Wagon)
CHEESE_WAGON is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2020, 06:00 AM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
Ronnie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,718
Year: 1971
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: International Loadstar 1700
Engine: 345 international V-8
Looks like he had plenty of straps on it. Wonder what happened that he was in a position to rear end another truck?
Ronnie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2020, 06:32 AM   #6
Bus Crazy
 
CHEESE_WAGON's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,474
Year: None
Coachwork: None
Chassis: None
Engine: None
Rated Cap: None
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
Looks like he had plenty of straps on it. Wonder what happened that he was in a position to rear end another truck?
Straps mean nothing with this type of load. That load should never have been put on a flatbed without an integral forward bulkhead -- period. Or at least a headache rack on the back of the sleeper cab to protect the driver.


BSF and I can both tell you they were likely not paying attention or following too closely. We're trained to look 15 seconds down the road and allow 600-800 feet following distance. This guy is probably out of a good truck and likely going to have a hard time finding a job. I can't think of a safety director in the world that wouldn't call this one preventable. Guy's lucky to be alive.

This is exactly why I tell fellow skoolie owners to be mindful of their surroundings and following distance when driving their rigs... They don't stop near as quick as you would need them to sometimes. I recommend 58 mph cruising speed in 60-65 zone, and 63 in 65-70 zones. So what if it pisses everybody else off, that's what the passing lane is for. You'll find that you use the brakes about 500% less, keeping them cool for when you REALLY need them.
__________________
"Cheese Wagon" <anomaly.va@gmail.com>

Former owner - 1989 Ford B700 64-pass Blue Bird (Rest In Peace, Cheese Wagon)
CHEESE_WAGON is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2020, 10:07 AM   #7
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Lebanon, Indiana
Posts: 592
Year: 2000
Coachwork: Winnebago
Chassis: Ford F53
Engine: Ford Triton V-10
Rated Cap: currently 2
Flatbed loads are the most intimidating looking simply because you can see the freight and how tenuously it is secured! It is important to remember though that ALL tractor trailer trucks carry heavy and often unpredictable loads even if it's all out of sight inside an enclosed van. I had a load last week that was a mix of various sizes gaylords in a dry van trailer. The rear row was strapped for stability but along the route someone cut me off and the electronic collision mitigation system applied the brakes hard enough to shift the load. When I arrived at my destination, the strap was hanging limp and the pallets were several feet forward of the strap! That much shift can be enough to unbalance a truck and cause a rollover, or make the truck no longer legal based on the weight distribution, and in many cases cost the driver and/or carrier the value of the freight when the consignee refuses to accept it in that condition. All because some ignorant car driver was talking on their phone and didn't decide until the very last possible second that they wanted to take that exit three lanes away so they swerved in front of an 80,000 pound wrecking ball doing 65 miles per hour.

I don't know about the situation in the video but it seems likely the truck driver was following too closely and/distracted as it seems he rear-ended another truck which caused the situation. Indeed also without a headache rack or integrated bulkhead he is lucky to be alive.
Sehnsucht is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2020, 11:14 AM   #8
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 201
Year: 2003
Coachwork: Blue Bird All American
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Rated Cap: 2 adults and two pigeons
I don't miss being an OTR driver. My loads in the trailer would shift even if I nailed down the pallets to the floor and strapped them. So many idiots who would just cut in front and hit the brakes. I enjoyed seeing the country and that was it. The dispatchers always pushing harder and harder. This was in 1993. Logs were easily fudged by pen. I would take the byways to avoid weigh stations just to make it in time. Hated that whole part of it. Aside from that, it Was fun and without GPS nobody would really bother you. Cell phones were a true luxury. A beeper is all I had and a row of 20 pay phones at the nearest truck stop to return calls to the dispatcher. Now they can pinpoint exactly where you are, shut you down and put you out.
__________________
--Simon


Found my Bus at AAAbus in Phx!
Bus'n it is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×