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Old 08-11-2017, 10:02 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf View Post
Yep! $10K solar system
$3500 system and 400AH lithium ion battery probably tips over that.

Your right - it does. I still don't want to scare anyone off though - my entire system is an extreme example. Some folks consider their solar charging system just to be the panels and controller. Some folks talk about their entire electrical system (inverter, electrical storage, etc...). 500 watts, PWM controller, a couple lead-acid batteries, and a 500 watt inverter is enough for most folks - probably $1,000 total.
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Old 08-11-2017, 10:05 AM   #22
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and please vote for your cost in this poll

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f18/an...ost-16739.html

whats your annual expense... isn't that what the OP asked for?

the last Skoolie get together i attended include someone with a trailer and a 600lb bouncy house. its all part of the hobby!

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Old 08-11-2017, 11:55 AM   #23
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most people are somewhere in between paying for all maint or having the skill set not only to convert but do complete rebuilds of all components themselves. i wouldnt have a bus if i didnt know how to r/r rear axles, rebuild mechanical components including the transmissions. and so on.
as far as 1k engine oil changes... it is way cheaper than that and i dont mind saving the oil for other uses like lube and starting brush fire, etc. also works in drip oil burner stove like my friend has...
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Old 08-11-2017, 12:17 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by debit.servus View Post
I feel the skoolie community is hiding the truth, because they want uninquisitive people to go for it, discover the maintenance is unaffordable, then have to sell the bus at a huge loss, which ends up registered to a bus veteran who has money or skill to keep it on the road.

I asked a reasonable question in a reasonable tone of voice, and clarified it over and over to eliminate all confusion.

Assuming the bus is acquired in good to great mechanical condition, like when it's retired from the school district. Can Skoolie veterans fill in the estimated price ranges (the question marks) for expected vehicle drivetrain maintenance for a big skoolie, including 5000 miles of wear and tear per year (like a car, wear and tear adds to the maintenance cost) for realistic numbers.

The four tiers of skoolie owner (and basically all of society):
Shoestring - does everything but rebuilding the engine and transmission:
?-?k budget per year

Frugal - does all basic and some intermediate maintenance, pays an honest mechanic to do everything else:
?-?k budget per year

Modest/middle class - all maintenance is at the shop by school bus pros:
?-??k budget per year

Loaded - bus drivetrain is show-ready, looks & drives like it's brand new:
??-??k budget per year.

Perhaps better cost figures can be had by estimating (or sharing your numbers) maintenance cost to a bus to keep it on the road for ten years, to factor in big overhauls. If cost figures can't be made, we can invent a rule of thumb or two if there are not good ones already.

If I don't get a comprehensive answer here. I'll go to Oak Grove School districts bus yard and try to ask their mechanics the maintenance costs, and maybe get onto their bus retirement contact list (if they have one).

I won't ask churches, But will scrutinize their buses for sale if or when I'm bus hunting.

I actually looked at a 30' Bluebird school bus in person, and the engine under the hood looked like a engine found in a semi tractor.

I'm too wise to speculate on things, and can't afford to go in without knowing what I can expect to pay for maintenance on things. I'm 23 going on 24 this November and I can't afford to lose any more of my young years to toil and hardship. I need to get into a rig for the decades to come, and live life exploring North America as soon as next year. I rather pay for quality upfront than pay the cost of cheap repeatedly.

Right now, the plan is to convert a 28' cargo trailer and pull it with an 80s work truck for the versatility and relatively low maintenance costs to the length of the rig. I estimate the truck will cost $1-3,000 a year to maintain and the trailer less than $500 per year to maintain its axles & wheels. If a skoolie costs a couple thousand more than this annually Im going for my original desire.
Quote:
I feel the skoolie community is hiding the truth, because they want uninquisitive people to go for it, discover the maintenance is unaffordable, then have to sell the bus at a huge loss, which ends up registered to a bus veteran who has money or skill to keep it on the road.
Dude- I hope you come to realize how unrealistic this statement is. I've NEVER seen this happen. We literally BEG some folks not to buy the crappy low rent buses they're asking us about, and once they realize how much SUCK they've purchased, none of us want anything to do with such buses.
The average idiot who buys a bus and then realizes its too much work for them typically sell it on CL for MORE than they paid. To folks who we try to steer towards buying direct from schools. But they want a bus NOW....
By and large we on this forum pride ourselves on helping save others a lot of grief in their bus purchases.
To suggest we're underhandedly giving people bad advice is rude, man.
I have helped at least a dozen folks find their buses, I've gained NOTHING from that other than making new friends and helping folks out the best I can.
A travel trailer will be cheaper and you should probably go that route. No oil to change. Just tires once in a great while.
IDK how others are spending so much but it costs me around $65 to change my oil and filter. My fuel filter was $40. Air filters are $50.
Tires are $250 each.
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Old 08-11-2017, 02:36 PM   #25
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Location: Essex, MD
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Year: 1999
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: Blue Bird TC RE 3904, Flat Nose, 40', 277" wh base
Engine: 8.3L Cummins ISC 260hp, MT643, 4.44 rear
Rated Cap: 84 pax or 1 RV; 33,000lbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by debit.servus View Post
What is your average cost to keep your big skoolie drivetrain mechanically sound per year?
'98 Blue Bird All American:
SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE

MONTHLY OR 1,000 MILES
• Grease safety barrier latch on Braun wheelchair lift.
• Lubricate roof hatch weatherseals & lock mechanisms.
• Inspect all emergency equipment mounting fasteners.
• Lubricate window latches and slides.
• Lubricate hinge pin on entrance doors.
• Lubricate pivot points on outward opening door.
• Check/adjust roller bracket and control rod bracket on jackknife door.
• Check/adjust air pressure in power jackknife door.
• Inspect outer fasteners and lubricate electric stop arms.
• Check air filter.
• Lubricate rear emergency door positive hold open hinge.

MONTHLY OR 3,000 MILES
• Check fuel system (Drain fuel and contaminants, if required).
• Check battery water level.
• Inspect brake chambers.
• Inspect manual transmission fluid level.
• Inspect clutch master cylinder and slave cylinder.
• Inspect Ridewell air suspension.
• Adjust shoe-type brakes.

3 MONTHS OR 3,000 MILES
• Inspect fire extinguisher to see if fully charged.
• Check first aid kits to see if fully equipped.
• Oil all hinges and window latches for ease of operation.
• Lubricate all window channels with silicone or graphite.
• There is one drain hole in each floor section under windows. Be sure hole is clear of debris so any
water may escape.
• Clean all rubber door seals and lubricate with rubber lubricant.
• All rear and side emergency door latch slide bars to be lubricated with light grease to reduce friction.
• Tighten all tie down bolts to 37-41 foot pounds torque at 1,000 miles, 2,000 miles, and quarterly thereafter.
Change main heater air filter (depending on operating conditions).
• Check seat cushion clamps.
• Inspect mounting bolts on body tie down.
• Inspect mounting fasteners and upholstery on seats.
• Lubricate bridge plate hinge and pivot on Collins wheelchair lift.
• Clean and lubricate fold cam slot, platform cam slots and handrail V-block on Collins wheelchair lift.
• Check fluid level in Collins wheelchair lift.
• Lubricate hinge and latch mechanisms on access doors.
• Check internal fasteners on electric stop arms.
• Inspect Bendix air dryer for excessive reservoir moisture.
• Clean and lube treadle valve mechanical actuating parts.

6 MONTHS OR 6,000 MILES
• Check lubricant level in rear axle.
• Inspect rear axle vent.
• Check power steering fluid level.
• Lubricate steering drag rod.
• Check single and double check valves.
• Lubricate spring pin.
• Inspect alternator.
• Clean battery posts.
• Disassemble and clean the air compressor governor and repair, as required.
• Lubricate entrance door vandal lock.
• Check/adjust emergency door vandal lock.
• Lubricate lock mechanism and door hinge on emergency door.
• Inspect destination sign for proper operation.
• Lubricate hinges and roller gears on destination signs.
• Check/adjust curtain on destination signs.
• Lubricate all working part joints on driver’s seat using lithium-based grease (aerosol).
• Check/adjust door control rod on manual entrance doors.
Replace fuel filter and fuel inlet screen.
• Lubricate sliding bolt mechanism on vandal lock.
• Inspect drive shaft.
• Lubricate universal joint and slip joint.
• Lubricate clutch release bearing.
Change engine oil and oil filter.
Change Perry water filter.
• Inspect fuel cap, tank, fuel lines and fuel tank valve.
• Inspect and check radiator and shutters.
• Lubricate brake camshaft, king pins, tie rod ends and slack adjusters.
• Inspect coolant hoses.
• Inspect accelerator system.
• Check fuel water separator and drain as required.
Change engine fuel filter.

12 MONTHS OR 12,000 MILES
• Complete Quarterly Maintenance Check List.
• Remove all seat cushions, thoroughly clean with upholstery cleaner and reinstall on a rotating basis.
• Adjust door control rod and closing mechanism to entrance doors.
• Bleed all air from heaters.
• Tighten all heater hose clamps.
• Check cylinder chains, hoses and wires on the Braun Wheelchair lift.
• Check heater hoses, motor wheels and fans on heaters.
• Clean heater core.
• Tighten heater hose clamps. (Tighten after first 1000 miles)
• Inspect power steering pump.
• Inspect steering gear.
• Lubricate steering column.
• Check front and rear suspension U-bolt torque.
• Check spring pin lock bolt.
• Check spring pin and bushing wear.
• Inspect suspension system and components.
• Inspect shocks.
• Inspect suspension hanger bracket to frame fastener torque.
• Inspect quick starting aid.
• Inspect engine block heaters.
• Pressure test engine cooling system.
• Check radiator fan and motor.
• Inspect electrical fuel transfer valves.
Replace engine air filter.
• Check air tank pop-off valves.
Change automatic transmission fluid.
Change internal and external automatic transmission filter.
• Inspect automatic transmission vent.
Change power steering reservoir filter.
Change lubricant in rear axle.
Change manual transmission fluid.
• Clean radiator.
• Clean shutters

24 MONTHS OR 24,000 MILES
Change thermostat.
• Clean relay valves, spring brake valves, parking brake valves, and quick release valves.
• Clean pressure protection valves.
• Inspect and clean Stratoflex air dryer.
Clean and flush cooling system.
• Inspect turbocharger.
• Steam clean engine.
These check lists are suggested. They do not replace or supersede local or state required driver inspection
procedure.
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Old 08-11-2017, 02:45 PM   #26
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Engine: 8.3L Cummins ISC 260hp, MT643, 4.44 rear
Rated Cap: 84 pax or 1 RV; 33,000lbs
I think I got most of the filter changes and the like.
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Old 08-11-2017, 02:54 PM   #27
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Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Essex, MD
Posts: 3,711
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: Blue Bird TC RE 3904, Flat Nose, 40', 277" wh base
Engine: 8.3L Cummins ISC 260hp, MT643, 4.44 rear
Rated Cap: 84 pax or 1 RV; 33,000lbs
Can't find the oil capacity for some reason.

Coolant
Cummins ISB
24.6 Quarts 23.6 Quarts
Cummins
ISC 38 Quarts
Cat 3126 41 Quarts

Tranny fluid
Cummins
ISB
20 Quarts 6.5 Quarts
Cummins
ISC 19 Quarts
Cat 3126 20 Quarts

Front Axle Fluid Capacities
Axle Model Oil Capacity
(pints)
Grease Per
Axle (lbs)
FD965 4.00 2.1
FF944 4.00 2.1
FF966 4.00 2.1
FF944 4.00 2.1
FG943 4.00 2.1
FH941 5.50 2.9
FF967 4.00 2.1

Rear Axle Fluid Capacities
Axle model Oil Capacity (pints)
RS-15-120 18.4
RS-19-144 32.3
RS-21-145 32.3
RS-23-160 39.5
RC-23-160 39.5
RC-23-161 39.5
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Old 08-11-2017, 02:58 PM   #28
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Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Essex, MD
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Year: 1999
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: Blue Bird TC RE 3904, Flat Nose, 40', 277" wh base
Engine: 8.3L Cummins ISC 260hp, MT643, 4.44 rear
Rated Cap: 84 pax or 1 RV; 33,000lbs
Fluid Capacities
Engine
Crankcase
Oil
With Filter Without
Filter
Cummins
ISB
18 Quarts 16 Quarts
Cummins
ISC
24 Quarts 20 Quarts
Cat 3126 30 Quarts 27 Quarts
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:59 PM   #29
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Thanks Everybody.

Thank you everybody who shared their numbers and expected costs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
Dude- I hope you come to realize how unrealistic this statement is. I've NEVER seen this happen. We literally BEG some folks not to buy the crappy low rent buses they're asking us about, and once they realize how much SUCK they've purchased, none of us want anything to do with such buses.
The average idiot who buys a bus and then realizes its too much work for them typically sell it on CL for MORE than they paid. To folks who we try to steer towards buying direct from schools. But they want a bus NOW....
By and large we on this forum pride ourselves on helping save others a lot of grief in their bus purchases.
To suggest we're underhandedly giving people bad advice is rude, man.
I have helped at least a dozen folks find their buses, I've gained NOTHING from that other than making new friends and helping folks out the best I can.
A travel trailer will be cheaper and you should probably go that route. No oil to change. Just tires once in a great while.
IDK how others are spending so much but it costs me around $65 to change my oil and filter. My fuel filter was $40. Air filters are $50.
Tires are $250 each.
I didn't mean to be rude. I felt like in the first page, people were beating around the bush on costs, withholding their numbers. I felt like I broke an unwritten rule on the forum "Do not share your bus maintence costs" .

I was looking at buying my bus from craigslist but now will buy from the school district.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Paranoid, much? If you have to keep asking AND you drive a big rig for a living (should have an idea of costs?), maybe find a less-expensive hobby.

I have a friend who enjoys scrapbooking and she says it is very relaxing.
I'm going to be a Company Driver, as I plan have months off every year so I can live life. I'm considering become an O/O, so I live in the tractor full-time working to live. If I'm going to become an O/O I want to put as little time and money into the tractor as possible, as trucking for me is stepping stone to get ahead in life and even if I wanted it as a lifelong carrer the autonomous trucks are coming in the next few decades.

For me right now, I'm looking at a skoolie as a unconventional looking place to live, function coming before form. Since I need to get into a rig ASAP I plan to going the trailer route I described, then later a bus.

I'm working to expand my means instead of mastering frugality, so I don't have to look for cheaper hobbies.
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:22 PM   #30
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Its not a set cost as it varies with each bus how many miles will you drive? We dont know that or how good your bus is. I drive truck also and dont think its a gold mine and im at 52cpm
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:48 PM   #31
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No matter what you buy , your costs will never compare to anothers. Where are you going to store that bus when you are out trucking and at what cost?
Why would you even expect people to dish out figures to someone they have barely talked with. You are only 24 you say and you have a lot to learn young man. There is a helluva lot more to life than knowing where every cent is going too. If the truth be told, if you have to ask about prices, then you cannot afford it. Same goes for boats, toys of any type.
You should just move on with your life while you are ahead of the game. With a bus comes debt. Debt keeps you a slave to the man and you are in the game for life. A slave just like the rest of us unfortunately to the almighty worthless piece of paper known as a dollar.

If you want any respect, show some.

John
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Old 08-15-2017, 05:57 AM   #32
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Year: 2000
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: 7.3L 210HP Turbo Diesel T444E
Rated Cap: 28 + 3 wheel chairs.

Monthly maintenance cost is $46.87 - don't let anyone fool you. Which mean $562.44 a year - and never a cent more.

I'm kidding. It's true there is no set yearly cost. It depends largely on what you are doing with your bus - I just had to get new tires, I had an International Dealer do a thorough check up on the engine - and had an oil / lube - rear axle leak repair... but I think that next year things will be less.

I read on a forum once to expect about $5000 a year in repairs / maintenance - and hope to never need to come close to that.

But... I am either going to be driving up and back down the east coast - or sitting in a locale in Florida - so one route will cost me a little more. If you change your oil and filters and lube parts yourself - it will be a lot less - some truck stops will have a deal on Oil / lube changes - but they can cost between $250 and $400 (every 5000 miles or so...).


It's like owning any machine. A bit like your yearly car maintenance costs and owning a house maintenance cost yearly. But either more than that or less.


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Old 08-15-2017, 05:58 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackJohn View Post
No matter what you buy , your costs will never compare to anothers. Where are you going to store that bus when you are out trucking and at what cost?
Why would you even expect people to dish out figures to someone they have barely talked with. You are only 24 you say and you have a lot to learn young man. There is a helluva lot more to life than knowing where every cent is going too. If the truth be told, if you have to ask about prices, then you cannot afford it. Same goes for boats, toys of any type.
I created this thread to help people, including myself. How are aspiring skoolie owners going to get realistic numbers for yearly running costs when nobody has made a thread about it before? Costs will never compare to others, but the range and expected costs can get into the ballpark.

My plan is to start trucking to make the money to buy a 28' cargo trailer, and convert it into a studio apartment on wheels piece by piece. I might go into debt for it depending on my then-circumstances. debt is a tool, the higher the interest rate the more motivated I will be to pay it off fast. The trailer will sit at my mom and dads house until I'm financially self sufficient.

I consider myself very wise for my age, and know what you wrote (it doesn't look like i conveyed myself that way). Life is too short to be deferred longer than needed, and thus the plan to get into a rig with relatively low running costs. I'm not going for a bus at this stage in life. This is not because I'm a cheapskate, quite the opposite with my planned quality and luxury for the trailer (read more at my blog debitservus.wordpress.com). The low running costs will allow for more nomadic experiences that I desire.

I'm working to expand my means as There is a helluva lot more to life than knowing where every cent is going to. I asked so I can gauge the financial viability of a skoolie as my next rig, not desiring to get in over my head, and get in debt before i get to have nomadic experiences with the bus. Or get on a hamster wheel working to pay seemingly-endless maintenance bills on a rig I'm unable to enjoy because I'm working to pay seemingly-endless...

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackJohn View Post
You should just move on with your life while you are ahead of the game. With a bus comes debt. Debt keeps you a slave to the man and you are in the game for life. A slave just like the rest of us unfortunately to the almighty worthless piece of paper known as a dollar.

If you want any respect, show some.

John
I'm done revisiting doing a skoolie. I'm going to introduce myself later this week in the appropriate skoolie.net forum, stay tuned.
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Old 08-15-2017, 06:07 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by debit.servus View Post
I created this thread to help people, including myself. How are aspiring skoolie owners going to get realistic numbers for yearly running costs when nobody has made a thread about it before? Costs will never compare to others, but the range and expected costs can get into the ballpark.

My plan is to start trucking to make the money to buy a 28' cargo trailer, and convert it into a studio apartment on wheels piece by piece. I might go into debt for it depending on my then-circumstances. debt is a tool, the higher the interest rate the more motivated I will be to pay it off fast. The trailer will sit at my mom and dads house until I'm financially self sufficient.

I consider myself very wise for my age, and know what you wrote (it doesn't look like i conveyed myself that way). Life is too short to be deferred longer than needed, and thus the plan to get into a rig with relatively low running costs. I'm not going for a bus at this stage in life. This is not because I'm a cheapskate, quite the opposite with my planned quality and luxury for the trailer (read more at my blog debitservus.wordpress.com). The low running costs will allow for more nomadic experiences that I desire.

I'm working to expand my means as There is a helluva lot more to life than knowing where every cent is going to. I asked so I can gauge the financial viability of a skoolie as my next rig, not desiring to get in over my head, and get in debt before i get to have nomadic experiences with the bus. Or get on a hamster wheel working to pay seemingly-endless maintenance bills on a rig I'm unable to enjoy because I'm working to pay seemingly-endless...



I'm done revisiting doing a skoolie. I'm going to introduce myself later this week in the appropriate skoolie.net forum, stay tuned.
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Old 08-15-2017, 07:03 AM   #35
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EastCoast, That was exactly what I was thinking.
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Old 08-15-2017, 08:56 AM   #36
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Engine: 5.9 Cummins, Allison AT1545
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewerbob View Post
Can't find the oil capacity for some reason.

Coolant
Cummins ISB
24.6 Quarts 23.6 Quarts
Cummins
ISC 38 Quarts
Cat 3126 41 Quarts

Tranny fluid
Cummins
ISB
20 Quarts 6.5 Quarts
Cummins
ISC 19 Quarts
Cat 3126 20 Quarts

Front Axle Fluid Capacities
Axle Model Oil Capacity
(pints)
Grease Per
Axle (lbs)
FD965 4.00 2.1
FF944 4.00 2.1
FF966 4.00 2.1
FF944 4.00 2.1
FG943 4.00 2.1
FH941 5.50 2.9
FF967 4.00 2.1

Rear Axle Fluid Capacities
Axle model Oil Capacity (pints)
RS-15-120 18.4
RS-19-144 32.3
RS-21-145 32.3
RS-23-160 39.5
RC-23-160 39.5
RC-23-161 39.5

i'm sorry i complain about my first oil change. it was really just $997. they did a bit more than the just the oil. it was a full fluids change on a vehicle unknown to me at the time. that included 4 gallons of syntran and parts and labor to add a shut off cable to the bus because the fuel shut off solenoid had failed.

i was going to do that first oil change myself and i went out and bought a big truck sized metal oil catch pan. as i got ready to change the oil, my truck was at an angle on the driveway. before i took out the plug, i thought a better move to flat spot...... when i got out from moving the truck, i looked back and had driven over and crushed my brand new oil catcher.

after a few curse words, i decided to take it to some pros for its first service.




so.....maybe i exaggerated the cost of the oil change. i meant getting my first oil change cost me that much. (there were some extra things)
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:07 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf View Post

i was going to do that first oil change myself and i went out and bought a big truck sized metal oil catch pan. as i got ready to change the oil, my truck was at an angle on the driveway. before i took out the plug, i thought a better move to flat spot...... when i got out from moving the truck, i looked back and had driven over and crushed my brand new oil catcher.
Man, that is the FUNNIEST thing I've heard in awhile. I can see you getting out, saying "What was that crunch noise?"

Sorry, totally something I would do.
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:25 AM   #38
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Year: 1997
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Chassis: International
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 32 Passenger
You know, I haven't laughed at a thread so much as this one. I love the sarcasm. I have always considered myself as a PROFESSIONAL SMARTASS !!!

WATCH THE POLICE & THE TAX MAN MISS ME,
I'M MOBILE !!!!!
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:48 AM   #39
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Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,617
Year: 1993
Coachwork: bluebird
Engine: 5.9 Cummins, Allison AT1545
Rated Cap: 2
lol, instantly, i knew exactly what that crunching sound was.

i wish i had taken a picture of it because it was so shiny new. it was one of these:

except with a big tire track thru the middle.

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Old 08-15-2017, 11:40 AM   #40
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Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Essex, MD
Posts: 3,711
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: Blue Bird TC RE 3904, Flat Nose, 40', 277" wh base
Engine: 8.3L Cummins ISC 260hp, MT643, 4.44 rear
Rated Cap: 84 pax or 1 RV; 33,000lbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by debit.servus View Post
but the range and expected costs can get into the ballpark.
Ranges and expected skoolie life have been covered before. This forum(like most) doesn't return very good search results unless you are looking for the part number to the starter for a 1998 Blue Bird with 5.9 engine (something very particular and precise). Should I buy a skoolie will get you a million hits and be based on a million criteria.

Quote:
My plan is to start trucking to make the money
There are MANY full time and ex truck drivers on this site. Mentioning that as a job and the next question asking how much and how often an oil change should happen is going to ruffle a feather or 3. How is this kid old enough to see over the dash if he doesn't know what an oil change costs?

Quote:
I consider myself very wise for my age, and know what you wrote (it doesn't look like i conveyed myself that way).
I think it had to do with your wording but as stated several times already... hypothetically you bought a '98 Thomas and drove it 13 miles before it blew a sleeve. Look up Dead Pirate, Our beastie died. His died andit's replaced already. I bought the same bus and drove it 3200 miles across the U.S. and didn't have to so much as top off the oil. Your bus has a 150,000 on it but it came from FL (DO NOT BUY A BUS FROM FL). It's a complete POS. My bus came with 250,000 loving miles from out west. Not a single spot of rust or oil anywhere. It's the same as buying a used car. Expected maintenance from new is easy to calculate for an industry standard. Still gotta exclude the lemons tho. Hopefully the bus lemons blew up before hitting 150k miles.

I posted the manual schedule for my bus. I've no idea if they vary widely or not. I suspect not. So at 6k it's an oil change. In my bus, that's 20 whatever quarts. Google your favorite auto parts store and 27 quarts *$4.95 a quart... Starters, alts, fuel pumps are going to vary by year make and model. I have no idea what those cost as I've not had to replace anything. Knock on wood, I won't have to for another 100,000 miles.
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