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Old 08-24-2020, 12:11 PM   #1
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International Travel

Hello!
Would anybody know if thereís any restrictions for worldwide skoolie travel?
Such as, do some countries not allow a bus to enter because of structural restrictions...and only accept vans?
(My plan is long term travel - into the central and south Americas, onto ferries into Hawaii...all around)
Thank you!

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Old 11-18-2021, 07:57 AM   #2
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I live in Argentina and I can assure you youíll have no problems. You will need to take into account the ~4k thatís going to cost you to ship the bus from Panama to Colombia as thereís no route there.

Youíll also need to plan your electric system as the US and Canada are the only countries that use 120v, the rest of America uses 220v.

Hope that helps !
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Old 11-18-2021, 01:15 PM   #3
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You need to research whether an American-made vehicle can be serviced or repaired where you want to travel. Mexico has plenty of US-name trucks, but all the long-distance buses there have European running gear. South of MX you'll find mostly European trucks and buses: Mercedes, Iveco, MAN, Scania, Volvo, etc. Why not buy a Mercedes Sprinter van instead of a skoolie? You can probably get it fixed in most places around the world. There are very few countries that have no Mercedes vehicles!

John
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Old 11-18-2021, 06:43 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Franco View Post
I live in Argentina and I can assure you youíll have no problems. You will need to take into account the ~4k thatís going to cost you to ship the bus from Panama to Colombia as thereís no route there.

Youíll also need to plan your electric system as the US and Canada are the only countries that use 120v, the rest of America uses 220v.

Hope that helps !

Yup, about 70 miles and it costs big bucks to get past that barrier. For which there are apparently no plans for putting in a road. 100 years ago that made some bit of sense as it provided a bit of a natural barrier to disease that would have time to gestate while on a sail or steam ship. But with today's airline system, it just seems a bit "last century".


That 70 miles dashed our idea of making the trip to Tierra Del Fuego as we're not going to invest 4K (and the time) each way to ferry across that gap.
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Old 11-18-2021, 06:58 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Franco View Post
I live in Argentina and I can assure you youíll have no problems. You will need to take into account the ~4k thatís going to cost you to ship the bus from Panama to Colombia as thereís no route there.

Youíll also need to plan your electric system as the US and Canada are the only countries that use 120v, the rest of America uses 220v.

Hope that helps !
Not quite. Cuba, Jamaica, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and most of the islands on down the line of Antilles operate on 110v. Even the British Virgin Islands runs on 110v. Canada is also 120v on single phase. The list goes on and on.

https://www.generatorsource.com/Volt...y_Country.aspx
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Old 11-18-2021, 07:05 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Iceni John View Post
You need to research whether an American-made vehicle can be serviced or repaired where you want to travel. Mexico has plenty of US-name trucks, but all the long-distance buses there have European running gear. South of MX you'll find mostly European trucks and buses: Mercedes, Iveco, MAN, Scania, Volvo, etc. Why not buy a Mercedes Sprinter van instead of a skoolie? You can probably get it fixed in most places around the world. There are very few countries that have no Mercedes vehicles!

John
Navistar has a large network of dealers in Latin America and is the number one manufacturer of diesel engines in Brazil. Other companies also have similar presences. The service manual for many of the school buses is also available in Spanish. About the only real challenge is parts, but only if you're really out in the boonies. Just means you get to practice "maŮana."
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Old 06-14-2024, 05:28 AM   #7
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I've been in a similar spot with needing to transport multiple horns for gigs and auditions. It can definitely be a challenge finding the right case that's both compact and protective, especially without breaking the bank.
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Old 06-23-2024, 01:53 PM   #8
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I've been in a similar spot with needing to transport multiple horns for gigs and auditions. It can definitely be a challenge finding the right case that's both compact and protective, especially without breaking the bank.
Have you checked out Protec cases? They offer some great options that fit under airplane seats and are more affordable compared to the pricier brands. I've used one for my P5-4 and found it reliable for travel.
Also, if you're into finding travel hacks, I recently stumbled upon a method for snagging cheap business class flights that's really upped my travel game.
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