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Old 11-29-2016, 09:00 PM   #1901
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Spent a good part of the day working on my floor. And after seeing a number of other posters pix of the same...I should probably write an "Ode to Asphalteum". Royal pain to clean up, but hey...my 70 year old floor looks like new compared to all the late model crumbling stuff I have seen here. Nothing remotely close to rust though on mine and very little in the way of even surface oxides. Too bad they didn't do a better job of applying it more evenly. Except for the big lumps here and there I probably could have just let it be.

But it does beg the question...why can't modern science and fancy chemistry seem to do nearly as good a job?

I will get a couple of pix tomorrow of that shiny antique metal.

ONWARD!
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Old 12-01-2016, 11:19 AM   #1902
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Follow up to "Ode to Asphalteum" --- As previously noted, the floor in my 70+ year old skoolie is in remarkable condition. Granted, scraping and cleaning the old asphalt based coating is a chore but apparently the stuff protects pretty darned well as you can see below.


What little surface oxides are present are mostly from my having cleaned and left some areas exposed for a couple of years. I thought I had welded all the bolt holes but found a couple of more under the tar.


Also began work on the area where my power panel will be. Part inside and part outside via a yet to be fabbed box that will be adjacent to my Honda gennie on the rear deck.


And while I was in the neighborhood, I cut out a small area of rust through that was right at the floor line. Have to finish tacking today, then a little body filler. "Weld Through" primer has been a life saver on this project since I am working on so may things at once and can't leave any metal exposed to Houston humidity.

Back to work.

ONWARD!
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Old 12-01-2016, 01:40 PM   #1903
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wow that floor is in amazingly good shape!! of course its probably higher quality and heavier metal than what they use nowadays.. and obviously better protected than shoving soon-to-be-moisture-laden plywood into the floor of a bus...

I remember as kid / teen riding the school bus that in heavy heavy rains even our brand new busses leaked water down to the floor from the windows...

im guessing its been an issue with skoolie windows all along so in your bus they got ready for it by protecting the heck out of the metal!
-Christopher
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Old 12-01-2016, 06:16 PM   #1904
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Yeah...skoolie windows have always been a problem. The originals on mine dropped down inside the walls along with tons of water. The coachmakers clever solution was to simply drill big holes in the brackets at the bottom and let it drain out that way. Problem there was that dust and dirt clogged the holes and by the time I got the bus, all of the brackets had totally rusted away.

But...that may be what saved the floor. Along with the asphalteum.
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Old 12-01-2016, 06:44 PM   #1905
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GM used the same technique for the window seals on cars!!.. the infamous drip-dry body they called it... holes in the bottom of the body that if werent clogged by dirt surely were if you Ziebarted your car.. (which alot of people did in the 70s and 80s)...

-Christopher
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Old 12-01-2016, 08:24 PM   #1906
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Tango, what a fine project! I can hardly wait for a chance together to compare notes. I know that the last thing I should be thinking about is another ancient bus project but somehow I keep a keen eye out for one anyway. Over the last year or so I have found none. Hopefully, we are not at the end of the line for these old gals!

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Old 12-01-2016, 10:32 PM   #1907
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Hang in there Jack. Hope springs eternal for that one, amazing "Barn Find"! Besides...you have way too much time on your hands.
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Old 12-02-2016, 01:01 AM   #1908
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Nice bus I would love to stop by and see it on my way out of town. You do some amazing work.
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Old 12-02-2016, 08:48 AM   #1909
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Hey Syntax...feel free to stop by. Just PM me and we can try to sort out timing. The rest of you folks are welcome as well. I am headed there now so I won't get email until tonight. My phone is nearly as old as my bus and only makes phone calls.
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Old 12-02-2016, 05:21 PM   #1910
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Its too late now but I got a trick that MAY help on the floors. Dry ice. I've prepped a few Mazda MX-5 race cars-and we have to take off the sound deadner goop in the interior. You take chunks of the stuff + set it on the tar + wait about an hour. It turns hard and can scrape it up with a putty knife. You get it right + its like scraping shingle off a roof. Wonder if it would work on older stuff.
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Old 12-02-2016, 06:41 PM   #1911
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I like the dry ice idea. Plus it would keep my margarita chilled while I work.
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Old 12-02-2016, 06:54 PM   #1912
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Its too late now but I got a trick that MAY help on the floors. Dry ice. I've prepped a few Mazda MX-5 race cars-and we have to take off the sound deadner goop in the interior. You take chunks of the stuff + set it on the tar + wait about an hour. It turns hard and can scrape it up with a putty knife. You get it right + its like scraping shingle off a roof. Wonder if it would work on older stuff.
Be nice if I could flip my bus 180 degrees, and use the dry ice method on the ceiling.
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Old 12-03-2016, 10:47 AM   #1913
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Body work...I HATE doing bodywork! --- More metal patching. An area adjacent to where I am building an electrical box was rusted out along the floor line so I took on the task of patching it. Made a patch out of some 18 gauge, traced it onto and over the offending area, cut it out with a grinder and cutting wheel, tacked it in, filled in the tacks all around, ground'em down then started on the Bondo work. But first...I watched a couple of YouTube vids on the subject. They helped a bunch.


Measure, cut, tack then tack some more.


Apply Filler, sand, more filler, sand.


Not pushing this brand but I did learn online is that the newer, fiberglass infused fillers are far superior to the old, creamy types. Stronger and more flexible.


A final thin layer of conventional filler and a top coat of Putty made for a fairly decent finish. Turned out much better than any of this type work I have done (bungled) before.

Next is to glue and screw some heavy gauge material around the perimeter of the big opening to provide a better welding base for the electrical box.

ONWARD!

PS...just for the record...vehicles made in America during the war years (WWII) were fabricated from whatever metal that was left after the government used the "good stuff" and is a nightmare to weld. So many impurities that it wants to blow out at any setting on my mig.Like trying to weld lead.
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Old 12-03-2016, 11:43 AM   #1914
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Apply Filler, sand, more filler, sand.
PSR- Putty Sand, Repeat. I feel your pain, it's such fun even when working with styrene models. Especially when there are huge gaps because of crappy moldmaking or age of the kit.
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Old 12-03-2016, 06:59 PM   #1915
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Looking good Tango. I doubt a "real" body man could do any better. Funny how it goes, I really enjoy working with body filler. On the other hand, while I can do it, I really don't enjoy working with wood. Go figger. Jack
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Old 12-03-2016, 07:04 PM   #1916
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I hate body work too... and it shows,.. seems any bidy work I do doesnt last very well...

im glad you know how to do it... its a great skill to have!!
-Christopher
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Old 12-06-2016, 08:01 PM   #1917
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Kinda reminded me a little of yours Tango.

https://www.facebook.com/toyman01?hc...WSFEED&fref=nf
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Old 12-06-2016, 09:53 PM   #1918
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Nice rig! Thanks Flyboy...love those old timers.
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Old 12-08-2016, 10:02 AM   #1919
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Moving right along...Got the big hole cut out for my electrical box as well as replacing some rusted body metal. This time I decided to "glue & screw" some supporting material to which the actual box will attach. As I previously have stated, the metal used for civilian purposes during WWII is next to impossible to weld since it contains so many contaminants so I took the easy way out. One inch x 1/8" flat strap all around the edge of the hole using poly adhesive and nuts & bolts. When the box is built I will be able to easily weld directly to the straps.


Fitting the straps and drilling a bunch of bolt holes.


Mostly finished. A few more bolts were added across the bottom but I needed to get the other pieces positioned and welded together first.

Now I can start on building the enclosure for the electrics.

ONWARD!

PS...discovered some body lead while working on that area. Great filler if you don't mind the brain damage that comes along with working with it.
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Old 12-08-2016, 10:49 AM   #1920
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'tis a little unnerving to cut a giant hole in an otherwise perfect body panel isn't it?
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