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Old 02-10-2024, 05:39 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by kowalewska.ka View Post
Hi! Do you have any smart ideas how to fit bikes inside the bus?
My ideas was to do so under the bed (so bed would have to be like 3-3.5 ft above the floor. Then do to the sliding platform from the back. But the door being not super wide will make access to other stuff in the back difficult. I would love to see what did you guys do. I only saw photos of that sort of setup from vans, not buses.
I was wondering if cutting a hole on the side would work (and slide bikes from there) - kinda like creating side doors. But then it would have to be under the windows and might inflence bus framing.
Anyone ?
I set mine up at the rear and have my queen bed above on actuators

Was gonna send you a pic but can’t paste the picture for some reason

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Old 02-10-2024, 07:15 PM   #22
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can’t paste the picture for some reason
You can't post pics here until you've made at least 5 posts.
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Old 02-10-2024, 08:18 PM   #23
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Are we talking bicycles or motorcycles?

Obviously, bicycles you load by picking it up and carrying, motorcycles, which *I* am equipped to load since Moby has a Maxon hydraulic lift installed (similar to a Tommy Gate), require a little more of a plan.

Equally obvious, ramp loading can be *interesting* at the best of times. Throw in wet conditions (if not outright rain), and/or when alcohol is involved, then hilarity and possibly danger are almost guaranteed. Just saying.

Anyway, one of the schemes I gave serious thought to was using DC-powered screw jacks (four) so the bed lives overhead. Basically, I didn't want to give up floor space for something only used 1/3 of the day.

Or alternatively, a Murphy bed was considered. But in the end, we opted for a rather nice air mattress. Added to which, Moby (large, white, like Melville wrote about) is what's called a hotshot. Think big rig with sleeper cab meets 24' local delivery truck for a hot night of monkey sex. A hotshot is the lovechild that result. So, this means our Freightliner chassis is equipped with a dog house so it has bunk beds, already (think grandsons added to the adventure).

Anyway, because I've read (above) of removing seats and front wheels so I am suspecting bicycles is what some folks have in mind. Me? A motorcycle makes for ready transportation if the rig breaks down and for local transport and doesn't involved towing a car or jeep (as I often see being done). Since I own a girlie Harley already, wheeling it in and out, plus strapping it down for transport, were considerations. Note; otherwise it lives outside while we're at an event (meaning how we deal with it not being underfoot during the day or at night). If stolen, we have insurance for a reason. Also, including a bicycle is easy enough, if a need presents (but wife doesn't do bicycles at all, and motorcycles *only* in an emergency).

Minor point being, the Harley is really only for me, or in the event of breakdown for a short trip to maybe grab a hotel while mechanics make repairs since living in the rig whilst broken down on the side of an interstate (what with the constant rocking of traffic going by) is not high on my list of things I wish to experience for more than maybe 10-minutes, and certainly not for a day or three if you catch my drift.

After all, one thing to go camping, another thing altogether would be doing it on the side of a busy thoroughfare! So speaking of breakdowns, one especially nice thing about a Freightliner-based rig like ours is this; in a country like ours, one absolutely dominated by 18-wheelers (versus diesel pushers and bus-based solutions) this means obtaining mechanics and repair parts is an order of magnitude easier (and thus, cheaper). Of course, I'm only talking about in the event of breakdown whilst on the road.

Anyway, *my* build makes no pretense whatsoever of simulating a commercial motor home. E.g. instead of all the comforts of home, it's quite simply outfitted for it's primary purpose - temporary living quarters. This, because I fly model airplanes so the use is purely short term versus full-timing. For model airplane events, substitute attending motocross races, desert racing, NASCAR racing events, going to Moab for some rock crawling, or whatever your interests are - if - they don't include back to nature and being in the middle of nowhere.

And no, I am absolutely *not* pooh-poohing those for whom middle of nowhere is the goal, just explaining why for me, the rig is primitive. Honestly, if the need present, I could - if I had to - live under a rock for two or three days. Moby is better than a rock, or even a tent!

Meanwhile, at best, Moby can be charitably described as *a small step above a pup tent* and based on photos, some of you take these things quite seriously. And note; while Moby meets the technical definition required by my county for a motor home tag (the usual, e.g. lighting, cooking, power, bathroom, and sleeping arrangement) my being (per my Dad whilst growing up), a wannabe guardhouse lawyer means;
  • Toilet requirements are met with a Loveable-Loo, and
  • Showering is a full size shower with 175 gallons (gray water only), and
  • Thus, zero blackwater handling, e.g. kitty litter (dispose of a bag, and
  • Cooking is met with a microwave (on site food vendors, or fast food)
  • Refrigeration is a dorm-type 110 via converter
  • Power is an onboard diesel (6KW Rigmaster) tied into main tanks, and
  • Is also met with six solar panels and two packs from a Mach-E, and
  • Cooling (comfort is important) is via 19kBTU via high SEER split
Re: motorcycle transport, I have a 24' Featherlite and it has these loop thingies bolted to the floor expressly for toting motorcycles. Basically (drop down bottom hinged rear door), and you just wheel it in, compress the forks, strap it down tight . . . and Bob's your uncle. Don't see why this can't be done with a bus and you're ready to go with it safely ensconced! Ramp that's four feet wide is surely bound to be easier than store bought, types.

Last thing; don't dismiss the idea of four screw jacks out of hand. This was the leading candidate until I realized a $100 air mattress would do well enough and in the event of failure, I'm just a Walmart run from replacement. However, I'm an engineer and amongst my enterprises is a machine shop. So fabricating this from 5/8 threaded rod (readily available in 10' sticks) and cheapo DC motors sourced off eBay plus bearings may be outside your wheelhouse, but not mine. Also, as usual, when you can't make it, but it so money solves everything.

Real point being, if you've never considered one of these air mattresses, you owe it to yourself to explore the possibilities. Ours has an air pump that will keep it inflated automatically, and doubles as the tool for emptying it with alacrity (5 minutes, max). Since it runs off a wall wart, the pump is actually DC based (if I were ever in a pinch).
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Old 02-10-2024, 08:22 PM   #24
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Guy's already said its bicycles. Mountain bike(s).
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Old 02-12-2024, 12:58 AM   #25
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Thanks! Those are definiately some ideas! I think they have to go under the bed, and based on what you say - either slide in or mounted brackets.
Since i dont have a w/c access, and i see that generally we should not cut the walls, then i need to load them through rear door. I am going to be measuring our bicycles in the next few days and see what we come up with. Ill keep you posted, thanks for help!
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Old 02-12-2024, 01:34 PM   #26
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There is also the question of what bike to store.... our road bikes take up less room than our mountain bikes. I'm not averse to taking off the pedals, and both the front and rear wheels to make them compact. We have travel bags for them for checked luggage.

Another option, depending on your intended use, is a smaller folding bike. I've seen these with RVs for around the park and around town. They are not the compromise you might think - the seat/pedal/handle bar geometry are about the same as a road bike, and they're fun to ride.

I travel with this bike on business sometimes. I've had it in the UK on gravel, and rode around Manhattan one afternoon. Fits in a suitcase at less than 50 pounds.
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Old 02-12-2024, 02:56 PM   #27
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i like eastcosatCB,s idea!
turn the handlebars the same direction as the front wheel.
hang the two tires on mounted hooks on the ceiling.
simply swing the bike up and secure it with a latch.
so the bike is flush/high as it can get on the ceiling.
put the pedals in the center/highest part of the ceiling if its arched.
could be quick and easy if ya have the headroom.

short busses dont have much room.
i keep everything under my bed as to keep my area as open as possible with no clutter.
all windows are not blocked either to help it feel bigger inside.
plus the 360 degree view when you wake up is awesome!

remember to keep a eye on your total gross weight during your conversion.
have fun!
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Old 02-12-2024, 05:23 PM   #28
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Ah, yes, with closer reading I see where I missed he did indeed clarify, bicycles. My bad.


Schwinn LeTour, sweet bike. I had an early 70s in light blue. Stolen a few years back. Pretty sure it was the cleaning lady's son and didn't have the heart to make a big stink so I wallowed hard and looked the other way. Rode it all through university and it was my daily exercise bike until then. Miss it and totally get your point about nice simplicity. Even today with my Trek crossover (mix of MTB and full on street bike), I miss how simple gear changes and derailleur changing was with the Le Tour as they were mounted on the down tube instead of on the bars. Sigh.
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Old 02-12-2024, 05:29 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by jbeech View Post
Ah, yes, with closer reading I see where I missed he did indeed clarify, bicycles. My bad.


Schwinn LeTour, sweet bike. I had an early 70s in light blue. Stolen a few years back. Pretty sure it was the cleaning lady's son and didn't have the heart to make a big stink so I wallowed hard and looked the other way. Rode it all through university and it was my daily exercise bike until then. Miss it and totally get your point about nice simplicity. Even today with my Trek crossover (mix of MTB and full on street bike), I miss how simple gear changes and derailleur changing was with the Le Tour as they were mounted on the down tube instead of on the bars. Sigh.
Yeah I sure love the downtube shifters. My LeTour has been reborn a few times. Its a sorta ratty bike after all these years but it rides so nice I'll never part with it. I've found some newer bikes are going to simpler drivetrains and even some downtube shifters on some new bikes.
My wife's roadbike is an 80's Miyata that's got shimano downtube shifters. That bike is a dream. Its fast and its so solid. If CadillacKid ever gets back to our neck of the woods we're wanting to give it to him in return for some help he gave us in the past.
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Old 02-12-2024, 10:25 PM   #30
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Pullout Drawer

I have mine in a 5' pullout drawer under my bed

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Old 02-12-2024, 11:04 PM   #31
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I like the pull-out design and would have done that too were it not for the fact that I used my single-speed hard tail to measure clearances… my full-suspension with dropper-seat requires just a little more than 5’ length and 30” height to fit…
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Old 02-14-2024, 03:52 AM   #32
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Not sure what is legal in US but in the UK I just fitted a tow ball point to the rear and use a removable bike rack that fits to the tow ball. Works fine for 2 bikes.
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