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Old 06-21-2019, 05:52 PM   #101
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Originally Posted by HenrysCat View Post
Well there ya go, Christians not realizing their own transparency.
The cat Seems to think she’s of ownership. But Henry is the elder of the group.
Murtaugh: I don't think Burbank the cat's gonna like this.
Riggs: I've got ten on the mutt.

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Old 06-21-2019, 05:54 PM   #102
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Originally Posted by Sleddgracer View Post
I'm not sure if I'm looking forward to traveling that way or not - so many years of traveling to one kind of race or another - horse gymkhanas, ski races, and for the last 40+ years sled dog races - didn't really matter what kind of race it was, getting from here to there on time had more similarities than differences - all had to be done on a schedule - all seemed to be somewhere far away that took at least two days of almost non-stop driving to get there - how soon we left home was dictated by how much school the kids could afford to miss when they were still at home, or how much time I could take off from work without going bankrupt - when we had to get there was dictated by race draws or pre-race meetings - they all involved traveling fast in an over crowded and often over weight vehicle with limited stops that required an almost choreographed routine so that duties could be carried out swiftly, thoroughly, safely, without wasting too much time - the ski races and dog sled races meant driving on icy or snow covered roads - seeing snow on the road gave a sense of relief because it meant the course or trails would be in good condition - the condition of the road was just something you dealt with - lol - never had time to consider stopping to smell the flowers, let alone actually stopping to do it - - when/if the time comes that I can wander just because I want to wander, I'm not sure how I'll handle that - lol
Seems like a bus in the fast lane would suit you. If you give this guy your bus specs, and speed needs heíll look for a bus for you.
He has faster buses then this one for sure. The one I was looking at a few weeks back from him was cruising 75 most everywhere.

It was cool, heís building a 4wd bus currently. The axles off of a military vehicle.

Youíve got a lot of story there. A lot about getting things done! I wish more people were getting things done like that. Thatís part of why Iím hoping this slower bus will teach me more patience. Itís my weakest element. I need things to be done faster always. Even if things are on track. It took a few extra days working on a engine once due to some weather and lacking in the right tools, and I wasnít having it. I got anxious, frustrated, overwhelmed, and bored all in one.
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Old 06-21-2019, 05:56 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by plfking View Post
That will be my lifestyle in a few years.

But what if it rains? Does it make a difference?
When it rains itís snore, cuz when it rains Iíll be sleepin.
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Old 06-21-2019, 05:57 PM   #104
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I would not buy that bus for the rockies. It'll do it but just go SLOW.
We will estimate one hill a day. Hahaha
That way Henry doesnít get elevation sickness.
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Old 06-21-2019, 06:06 PM   #105
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Iíll take you up on that thanks!
Find one with 6th gear already unlocked and save yourself a bunch of headache.
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Old 06-21-2019, 06:09 PM   #106
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Originally Posted by HenrysCat View Post
Well there ya go, Christians not realizing their own transparency.
The cat Seems to think sheís of ownership. But Henry is the elder of the group.
The cats does have ownership, and the dog knows it. You know what the difference is between cats and dogs? Dogs say "These people feed me and love me and pet me. They must be Gods." A cat says "These people feed me and love me and pet me. I must be a God.
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Old 06-21-2019, 07:38 PM   #107
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Originally Posted by HenrysCat View Post
Seems like a bus in the fast lane would suit you. If you give this guy your bus specs, and speed needs heíll look for a bus for you.
He has faster buses then this one for sure. The one I was looking at a few weeks back from him was cruising 75 most everywhere.

It was cool, heís building a 4wd bus currently. The axles off of a military vehicle.

Youíve got a lot of story there. A lot about getting things done! I wish more people were getting things done like that. Thatís part of why Iím hoping this slower bus will teach me more patience. Itís my weakest element. I need things to be done faster always. Even if things are on track. It took a few extra days working on a engine once due to some weather and lacking in the right tools, and I wasnít having it. I got anxious, frustrated, overwhelmed, and bored all in one.


maybe my story is about making time in my life for adventure and trying to balance the adventure with the stability it took to raise a large family at the same time - it made it easier when most of my kids inherited my adventure gene - lol
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Old 06-21-2019, 08:22 PM   #108
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Originally Posted by Sleddgracer View Post
I'm not sure if I'm looking forward to traveling that way or not - so many years of traveling to one kind of race or another - horse gymkhanas, ski races, and for the last 40+ years sled dog races - didn't really matter what kind of race it was, getting from here to there on time had more similarities than differences - all had to be done on a schedule - all seemed to be somewhere far away that took at least two days of almost non-stop driving to get there - how soon we left home was dictated by how much school the kids could afford to miss when they were still at home, or how much time I could take off from work without going bankrupt - when we had to get there was dictated by race draws or pre-race meetings - they all involved traveling fast in an over crowded and often over weight vehicle with limited stops that required an almost choreographed routine so that duties could be carried out swiftly, thoroughly, safely, without wasting too much time - the ski races and dog sled races meant driving on icy or snow covered roads - seeing snow on the road gave a sense of relief because it meant the course or trails would be in good condition - the condition of the road was just something you dealt with - lol - never had time to consider stopping to smell the flowers, let alone actually stopping to do it - - when/if the time comes that I can wander just because I want to wander, I'm not sure how I'll handle that - lol



Sounds like you're part of the human race, I'm just a human being.
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Old 06-21-2019, 08:37 PM   #109
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Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post

And this is what you look for to determine air-brake equipped....

Attachment 34582
So maybe you know the answer to this: for me, pushing and pulling that yellow brake button is kinda painful. There's a snapping shock to it that I feel in the bones of my fingers (I have the beginning of arthritis going on in my hands). Do you know why that particular switch (which I guess is what it is) has to work like that? I'm thinking of rigging up some sort of jury-rigged thing for it where I pull it with a bungee cord and have some kind of padding on it for pushing.
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Old 06-21-2019, 08:40 PM   #110
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Bra-VO!!!
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Sounds like you're part of the human race, I'm just a human being.
Good one!
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Old 06-21-2019, 08:49 PM   #111
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Originally Posted by HenrysCat View Post
If you give this guy your bus specs, and speed needs heíll look for a bus for you.
He has faster buses then this one for sure.
Did you mention the spelling of "busses" to him? He might be confused by all the herring fishermen calling him.
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Old 06-21-2019, 09:09 PM   #112
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OK...
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Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
Did you mention the spelling of "busses" to him? He might be confused by all the herring fishermen calling him.
You got me on that one!
Kindly elucidate. Or is this a red herring..?
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Old 06-22-2019, 02:18 AM   #113
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"Busses" is an old usage for the now commonly used "buses", plural of "bus".
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Old 06-22-2019, 04:46 AM   #114
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No, I know that, what I'm not twigging to regards the herring fishermen calling...
I'm used to spewing arcane info, not so much so being on the receiving end!
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Old 06-22-2019, 05:48 AM   #115
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No, I know that, what I'm not twigging to regards the herring fishermen calling...
I'm used to spewing arcane info, not so much so being on the receiving end!
A buss was a type of sailing ship from the 1400s onward: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herring_buss

"Bus" comes from the name of a restaurant, weirdly enough.
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Old 06-22-2019, 06:35 AM   #116
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A buss was a type of sailing ship from the 1400s onward: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herring_buss

"Bus" comes from the name of a restaurant, weirdly enough.
Aaaaaaaaaaah! OK, then!
Congratulations on cutting down my tree, it's not often that I get stumped...
Which makes the verb form of the word more sensible now, i.e., "to bus tables."
Thank you for expounding on the word's etymology!!! Chilled legumes.
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Old 06-22-2019, 12:40 PM   #117
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Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
So maybe you know the answer to this: for me, pushing and pulling that yellow brake button is kinda painful. There's a snapping shock to it that I feel in the bones of my fingers (I have the beginning of arthritis going on in my hands). Do you know why that particular switch (which I guess is what it is) has to work like that? I'm thinking of rigging up some sort of jury-rigged thing for it where I pull it with a bungee cord and have some kind of padding on it for pushing.
I presume you are referring to the way this hand valve 'pops' when engaging the parking brake, or when system pressure is too low. I can imagine that might be a bit hard on someone with arthritis. Disengaging the parking brake requires smooth, easy pressure, which could still be difficult for someone with arthritis.

As to the internal dynamics of this component, I can't say with absolute certainty, but I believe this is nothing more than a hand-operated air valve with an air-pressure activated spring, which is likely the 'snapping shock' you refer to. The reason for this design has to do with the fail-safe for low air system pressure (the spring brake, after all, IS your emergency / parking brake). I can't offer a guaranteed solution, but taking your fingers out of the equation may help. A couple thoughts off the top of my head that might help you...

There is a tool called a pickle fork, commonly used with separating suspension components on conventional vehicles. Based on dimensions I'm seeing, maybe it's possible such a tool (or something similar) could fit over the shank of the knob where it joins the valve with something between it and the dashboard as a fulcrum, and be used as leverage to reduce the amount of pressure needed to pop it out. Would isolate your fingers and hands from the knob when it pops out, and reduce the amount of effort needed. They're not expensive, and you may even already have one, or know someone who does, so you can test this theory without buying one.

Careful, though, too much pressure could break or crack the knob, perhaps even crack plastic dashboards where the valve mounts. It shouldn't take much with such a tool for assistance. Like using a fulcrum and a lever to lift an object without which it wouldn't otherwise be possible. And perhaps this idea could be reversed using the door swing lever (if still installed) as a fulcrum of sorts for releasing.

Also, seeing as low system pressure forces the valve to pop itself out, here's an idea. Moisture and oil accumulation in the supply tank necessitate periodic purging anyway, so perhaps you could replace the manual drain valve with some sort of electric-controlled one that could be activated from the driver's seat? I know that some vehicles with air brakes have automatic air tank drains, maybe one of these could be remotely controlled with a solenoid or something.

If that could be done, basically the idea is that you would be purging the tank at the touch of a button, forcing the parking brake to set itself. Keeps your system free of moisture too, which is a problem in colder climates -- it will form ice in the lines and render the system inoperative. Been awhile since I had to purge a tank, so I'm fuzzy on how long it takes to bleed off. Downshot to this is that the system will have to build pressure again before you can release the parking brake, but it's generally a good idea to warm the engine before driving anyway. You could always set up a small electric compressor to build some pressure while parked to reduce build time when restarted. Just a thought. But be aware that if you go this route, your parking brake is NOT set until that yellow knob pops out on its own. Until then, keep your foot on the brake pedal.

If it helps, to disengage the parking brake, I've always used the very bottom of my palm, where the thumb joins, flat against the valve knob surface.

Just my $0.02. I'll think some more on it and let you know if I have any other ideas. Hope that helps!
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Old 06-22-2019, 12:54 PM   #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
So maybe you know the answer to this: for me, pushing and pulling that yellow brake button is kinda painful. There's a snapping shock to it that I feel in the bones of my fingers (I have the beginning of arthritis going on in my hands). Do you know why that particular switch (which I guess is what it is) has to work like that? I'm thinking of rigging up some sort of jury-rigged thing for it where I pull it with a bungee cord and have some kind of padding on it for pushing.
maybe you already own one of these?
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Old 06-22-2019, 01:14 PM   #119
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maybe you already own one of these?
LOL Sleddgracer, you read my mind. LOL. Though I think the automotive tool version would be more up to the task.
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Old 06-22-2019, 01:57 PM   #120
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maybe you already own one of these?
How dare you even suggest I don't own one!
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