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Old 07-27-2020, 03:38 PM   #1
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Heater line removal

Hello everyone my name is Paul and my partner Meredith and I have a 1999 Chevy 3500 Thomas built short bus. We have started the conversion process and are currently prepping for bodywork. We have some rust issues because the vehicle was purchased from Ohio and the winters here suck LOL.
As I uninstalled the rear defroster/heater that sat in the back left of the bus I realized those lines that hold coolant are connected to the entire coolant system for the motor of the vehicle. I’m unsure of how to cap them or keep them from leaking excess antifreeze out and inevitably overheating the engine.
We are currently unable to drive the bus because there’s no coolant in it. Is it as simple as finding some sort of fitting to plug the end of the lines and then tucking them up nicely on the frame so they don’t get damaged while we drive?
Or is there a better way to shorten the lines in Them while still maintaining the proper amount of coolant for the engine?
Any input would be appreciated thanks in advance

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Old 07-27-2020, 03:54 PM   #2
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You can cut them and then link them together so one feeds back into the other. Or replace them altogether with one short piece for the loop. No worries, the engine and radiator have all the coolant needed. The stuff in the heater lines is extra just for the heater.


If it were me, I'd keep the heater, possibly relocate it. I kept mine.
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Old 07-27-2020, 04:36 PM   #3
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Awesome thank youuuu
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Old 07-27-2020, 04:50 PM   #4
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Multiple people recommended to me to connect the lines together so the flow still has a complete circuit and you don't have to fool around with the system itself. I was going to remove mine but I decided to keep them since we get tons of rain where I live.
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Old 07-27-2020, 09:32 PM   #5
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Inline coolant pump

Piggybacking onto this thread as itís pretty much exactly where Iím at.

Working on our new (to us) 2001 GMC 3500 4-window Blue Bird (6.5 L diesel) with the same heater setup. Planning on disconnecting and removing the coolant lines tomorrow and I found a pump on one of the lines. Can I just do away with that and loop the lines Ďbeforeí that?

It wouldnít bother me, but the pumpís just sitting on top of my battery, not bolted to anything, on a flimsy little piece of foam.

My gut tells me itís no big deal to remove the pump, but Iíve learned enough lessons the hard way that I ask before I act. Most of the time.

Once I have them out, is it really just as simple as plugging in the new piece of coolant hose that I bought?

Thanks in advance!
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Old 07-27-2020, 09:57 PM   #6
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I would guess that the pump is either (a) for very cold winters, used in combo with a coolant heater, to keep the motor from freezing and help it start faster; or (b) the water pump went out and this was some rigged job done by someone with no cash to spend.


If (a), then rip it out.
If (b), get a new OE water pump, and then rip it out.
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Old 07-28-2020, 06:59 AM   #7
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I wouldn't think that little pump could move enough coolant to keep a 6.5l diesel cool, that is what some would call a booster pump (similar to a lift pump in a diesel fuel delivery system), it takes load off the water pump by pushing (or pulling) the coolant out and back.
With the mix and match valves and the unrestrained placement of the pump, I would imagine that is 100% aftermarket hack.
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Old 07-28-2020, 07:05 AM   #8
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those little pumps are heater boost pumps.. you can take them out if you are removing your rear heaters..



the engine water pump is for cooling the engine
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Old 08-10-2020, 10:41 AM   #9
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I am planning to remove my rear heater, but leave the one located by the driver. Coming from the engine, the coolant lines go to the driver heater, then to a pump, then to a rear heater across the bus. Do you think the pump is needed for only the drivers heater?

Thanks
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Old 08-12-2020, 08:22 PM   #10
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I did the exact same thing just two weeks ago on a 2000 GMC 3500 Thomas short bus. If you follow the two lines from the heater all the way to the engine compartment you will find a series of little T fittings. The T fittings split the radiator hoses for the engine and allow the heater lines for the rear to branch off. I removed the T fittings and replace them with brass heater hose connectors for three dollars each. I then removed the hoses that ran from the Engine compartment all the way to the rear of the bus. Warning… It’s messy! The entire job took about an hour. I don’t have any leaks and I don’t have to worry that some hose bent back on itself can crimp etc.
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Old 08-12-2020, 09:15 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flying Pig View Post
I did the exact same thing just two weeks ago on a 2000 GMC 3500 Thomas short bus. If you follow the two lines from the heater all the way to the engine compartment you will find a series of little T fittings. The T fittings split the radiator hoses for the engine and allow the heater lines for the rear to branch off. I removed the T fittings and replace them with brass heater hose connectors for three dollars each. I then removed the hoses that ran from the Engine compartment all the way to the rear of the bus. WarningÖ Itís messy! The entire job took about an hour. I donít have any leaks and I donít have to worry that some hose bent back on itself can crimp etc.
I traced the lines back and it was a simple job to remove the lines going to the rear and just go in and out of the front heater. Thanks for the advice
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