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Old 10-19-2018, 09:19 AM   #21
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I have very much enjoyed your well written post! I must say that your endeavor reminds me of another kind of similar tale that had you been there in the "time" you surly would have been up for. While all this happened 50 years ago it is clear to me that you-all are made of the same stuff. I hope you will take the time to enjoy this trek from days long gone. Jack

https://www.hemmings.com/blog/2014/0...huff-and-puff/.
Hey, thanks for that, Jack -- I read the whole story you linked to, and enjoyed it very much! Although I feel like they hardly make folks like that anymore; the patience and knowhow required to do so much maintenance on a cross-country road trip is mind-blowing. That spirit is definitely something to aspire to.
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Old 10-19-2018, 10:23 AM   #22
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Yesterday morning I'm at the breakfast table, reading the news and free Craigslist like I always do, and I find an ad for a free king-size foam mattress that's guaranteed to be clean, no bedbugs, etc.

My first thought was: a king-size mattress is exactly three times the width of the narrow bunks in my bus. I'll be able to cut this thing into thirds, so that along with a futon pad on a bottom bunk, I'll have legit mattresses for the four bunk spaces!

I email the person, ask if I can come get it, etc. The reply comes after I've already arrived at my office, dressed for work. The person says it's really heavy and I'll need help. I'm thinking, meh, it's a big foam mattress, it can't be that bad, but I say I'll bring help, so the person gives me the address.

We get there and there's snow on the porch and I'm not really dressed for manhandling large objects across slippery decks and onto vehicles. And it's a large object for sure: the mattress turns out to be a foot thick. But it is clean, and by now I'm committed to it. I get the thing home and put it in the garage and go back to work. And yes, I'm thankful to have a job that gives me the flexibility to go and get mattresses when they pop up for free on the Internet.

After work I get home and start grokking this thing. What am I going to be able to do with a foot-thick mattress? The clearance in my bunks is already low, and I built them with four-inch mattresses in mind. Now I'm looking at tripling the thicknesses? Well, I remove the zip-off cover and take scissors to the sewn-up fabric outer layer. I do the latter with a bit of heartbreak, because in the interim I've googled the make and model, and have found that this thing is worth more than a thousand bucks brand-new, and it's in immaculate condition.

Inside, the mattress is made of three layers: the base is about seven inches thick, and then glued really tightly onto that is another three-inch layer, and finally, there are two inches of memory foam. They're definitely not made to come apart; I work the corners a little and it almost seems like the layers are melted or fused together. Bummer.

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/member...cture20237.jpg

Nevertheless, and undeterred, I begin hacking the thing into three pieces with a serrated bread knife.

Here it is after I've cut off the first third:



Oh yeah, a word about methods: I put the thing up on a bunch of plastic bins, which, in my garage, are generally used as sawhorses, regardless of contents. I let the one-third I wanted to cut basically hang from the edge of where I situated the bins, so that as I cut, gravity would pull the cut wider and I'd be able to slice deeper and deeper into the mattress. The knife blade was only about ten inches long, so I had to work at it like a samurai with the world's tiniest katana. Still, it was quick work -- probably ten minutes total.

The memory foam is kind of rubbery, so I expected to be able to slice it smoothly. The puffier, drier yellow foam underneath, though, worried me. I worried that the blade would tear it rather than slice it, and I'd end up with a really ragged cut with a lot of ripped and balled-up pieces of foam. True to the word of a million serrated-bread-knife advocates online, though, it all worked very well. Thanks, Pioneer Woman™; five stars for your knife, although I have no idea how well it cuts bread.

I think the first big cut was better than the second, because on the first, I worked slowly and didn't cut too deeply, and used several passes to slide deeper into the mattress. On the second, I got overconfident, and also got a little too into the samurai thing while my seven-year-old cheered me on. I was sinking the blade all the way in, the way a hungry neanderthal goes to work on a mastodon carcass. The knife turned out not to be quite vertical, but in the end, all three pieces were basically the same width.

Only the middle piece was knife-sliced on both sides; the other two, of course, each had a smooth, factory-cut side that I could face outward. Probably doesn't matter, though, because now I'm on the lookout for free/cheap fabric that I can sew around the mattresses.

Let's not think too far ahead, though. You'll recall that I now have three foot-thick mattresses, for bunk beds that are already short on headroom. So after all the slicing in the garage, I haul them out to the bus and put them in place.



The young Padawan expresses doubt. And rightly so; at the very bottom, you're seeing a tiny strip of wood, and then foam foam foam, more foam, foam, and memory foam, and then a coffin-sized space where a person can squeeze in. Up top, it's even worse:



Hard to see in the photos, but look how the mattress basically covers the windows completely. All you end up with is the curved roof space above the windows. Sure, for sleeping, it's pretty great, on a Princess and the Pea level of luxury. I'm thinking if the kids complain, I'll be like, 333 dollars' worth of mattress had to die for you to enjoy this comfort. But it also means that the bottom bunks are useless as seating, and with six people potentially crammed in this shortie on a rainy day, it's not going to work.

Then the Padawan says, "Hey, Dad, look: the sections of the mattress are loose right here, and we might be able to pull it apart." Sure enough, he's right: maybe it was all the bending and hauling and cutting, but a couple of places along the edge of the mattress have come loose, and the layers can be slowly peeled apart where they were glued.

For about the next hour, I worked my way around the corners and edges, peeling one of the mattresses into two layers. One was the seven-inch-thick regular foam, and one was the five-inch-thick layer of regular foam + memory foam. I figure those are still thick, but they're thicknesses I can work with.

With a lot of patience, and occasional help from the Pioneer Woman™ when the layers started to rip rather than peel, I got about 2/3 of the way through the first mattress. It was looking good, though. But it was dark, and about 30 degrees outside, and time for dinner.

I'll finish it, and rip the other sections, ASAP. But I'm kind of pumped; now it looks like I'll end up with six quality bunk mattresses. I'll probably use four for the bunks, and continue using a futon pad up front for when I fold out the big sleeping platform (which I've finished...more on that later!), and then have two of the foam pieces left as spares.
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Old 10-20-2018, 03:34 AM   #23
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I was sinking the blade all the way in, the way a hungry neanderthal goes to work on a mastodon carcass.


I'm thinking if the kids complain, I'll be like, 333 dollars' worth of mattress had to die for you to enjoy this comfort.


Started laughing about 20 minutes ago, and figure I'll either stop soon, or die of oxygen deprivation.

You write almost as well as Dave Barry. A good laugh is a great way to start the day.
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Old 10-20-2018, 01:42 PM   #24
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Just read your thread. I enjoyed it and love the progress. keep up the great work.
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Old 11-02-2018, 02:32 PM   #25
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You guys are great!

So here's where I am now:

Storage area in the way back:

I've pretty much finished the big stuff in the rear of the bus. At the very back, inside the back door, I have floor-to-ceiling shelving on both sides. It takes up less than one window's worth of length, but each shelf is about 24"x26", and they vary in depth. Right now I'm storing a dog crate that holds our two small dogs, a full-size cooler, a bunch of stacked-up camp chairs, a huge duffel bag that holds everyone's sleeping bags, a bin full of camping equipment like hatchets, rope, Coleman fuel, etc.

Oh yeah, and I turned one of the "shelves" into a countertop, pulled the sink out of my derelict pop-up camper, and installed the sink so it drains into my two-gallon "gray water tank," which is a repurposed wide-mouth plastic bottle that used to contain kitty litter. Up above the countertop and sink is a shallower shelf where I can throw a bunch of gallon jugs of water.

Do I have pictures of all this? Sort of. You can sort of see the back storage area throuuuuuugh the bunks in the pictures I'll paste below.

Bunks:

In the previous update, I talked about getting a foot-thick king-size memory-foam mattress (so many hyphens!) and cutting it into thirds, to provide padding for three of my four bunks. I also talked about how that didn't turn out well, because the mattresses were just way too thick.

But...I also mentioned the possibility of pulling the layers of the foam mattress sections apart, to create six bunk-sized pads instead of three. Well, I succeeded in doing that with two of the three sections. This left me with five-inch-thick pads for the two top bunks, each covered with a layer of memory foam. They're perfect. It also left me with two seven-inch-thick mattresses, made completely of high-density yellow foam. I put one on the bottom bunk, and actually slept on it for a night to test it.

It wasn't great. It works well when I'm driving and people are sitting on it, because it absorbs the bouncing created by my bus' terrible suspension. But while I'm great with a firm mattress, this was just a little too firm for sleeping. I did find that if I threw one of my old Coleman cot pads on top, it was fine, but that eliminates a little more headroom. So I'm still working that out. If I had a hot wire foam cutter, I'd slice the thing the long way to thin it out, and then throw the softer cot pad on top.

Here's how the bunks are looking now, though -- not bad!



And see, back behind it, you can see some of the storage area in the back. Originally I didn't like the idea of fully partitioning the bunk area from the storage area, but I'm going to, mainly to keep gear from flying forward in the event of a sudden stop. I have a bunch of narrow boards from deconstructed, non-chemically-treated pallets, so I'm going to put those along the back "wall" of the bunks. It'll fit with the, ahem, tough and rustic aesthetic that's already fairly well-established in there.

Front area:

The front area has taken me the longest to figure out. As you may remember, this shortie has to fit six people, and occasionally, two smallish dogs. So the set up is, dogs in their crate in the rear storage area, kids on the bunks, and me and my wife in the front. The front section is only about five feet long, though, so the bed has to go across the bus.

My solution for that was basically a loveseat that flips over to create a platform. The sofa is the same depth as the bunks -- about 26 inches. Flip it and you get to 52 inches -- not long enough for anyone bigger than an Oompa-Loompa. So on the other side, I built a bench about 19 inches deep, and its top flips open too, to connect with the flip-over sofa. So you end up with this massive platform. The cushion on the loveseat is a folded up futon pad, so you just throw that thing across the platform and you're done.

I know some people hate convertible furniture, like drop-down dinettes and the like, but I kind of like the solution I've come up with. And I've tested it out in the course of a driveway campout with everyone inside, and it's not too bad. Anyway, I don't have pictures of it all opened up, but here's how the sofa looks:



Here's what I still want up in the front area: some kind of table that I can pop out over the small bench when I need it, so I can cook inside if I want to. Most of the time, when we're camping, we'll just cook outside. But the way we use this bus already, I use it during the week with the kids to take little outings to parks, or up to ridgelines to look at the changing leaves and stuff, and it's really nice to just set up the two-burner propane stove and make hot chocolate or heat up some apple cider. I like that I have this mobile basecamp that I can use at a moment's notice, and being able to cook something up really quickly is a huge asset. So, more to come on that, for sure.

Overhead shelf up front:

But space and organization are SO important in this thing overall. My project last Sunday was to get a shelf up over the sofa as a much-needed catch-all up front. The downfall of convertible furniture is that you can't put stuff on it and keep it there -- nighttime comes and you want to crash, and you realize you have all this junk spread out all over the table. So I want to keep the front uncluttered, all the time.

I didn't reinvent the wheel here or do anything that clever -- just basically ripped off the thing I've seen lots of people do on this website. I screwed some 2x2s into the ceiling and made a basic frame, jigsawed some plywood for the ends, cut a piece of ply for the bottom, and voila, a shelf. I have some trim that still needs to go around the front, but I feel like it's a pretty decent light-duty storage area. Yep, I just threw it right up there, overlapping the front headliner, because I don't really care, and I kind of like having that headliner up there; I just notched the 2x2 so it would go over the metal trim piece and still lie flush on the ceiling:



I kind of come from a family of warrior-poet types, whose idea of summer vacations was to go up to the ancestral hunting cabin in northern Michigan and explore the woods by day, and read and tell stories under the flickering gas lanterns by night. I have raised my own family the same way, so for us, it would be impossible to have a proper adventure bus that wasn't stocked with decent books. The inner lip of the shelf keeps the books in place, but it's important to have some other ballast up there to keep them from tipping forward where they form stacks and then slide out sideways. So the shelf ends up being a good place for a bin of coffee mugs, some duct tape, and a horizontal copy of the kids' poetry book Where the Sidewalk Ends:



Excelsior...
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Old 11-02-2018, 07:58 PM   #26
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OK, took more photos this afternoon.

Yer basic back-of-the-bus storage shelves, with dog crate, duffel full of sleeping bags, bin full of cooking gear, slackline, and whatnot:



Storage on the other side, with cooler, lantern, electrical cords, bin full of gear, sink, and my state-of-the-art one-gallon freshwater tanks:



Front shelf, starting to look a bit more finished, still a bit to do:



Little by little, and in the meantime, using it. We'll be taking it out for another ride tomorrow, maybe using it as a basecamp while some of the kids go fishing. Anyone who gets bored can go lie down and read a book inside
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Old 02-14-2019, 10:01 AM   #27
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Just a quick update on this. I've kept moving on little things during all this winter weather, mostly on the interior.

My bus has about 14 feet of usable space behind the driver's seat. The rear nine feet of that are taken up by storage and bunks. That leaves five feet up front for living area/seating, and a place for me and my wife to sleep. Deciding how to use that space has been a bit of a challenge.

Here's the front area, driver's side. I built a bench that flips over to make a flat platform (more on that in a sec), shelves above for books and stuff, and a bulkhead made from pallet boards to separate the sitting area from the kids' bunks. I wasn't sure about the bulkhead idea generally, because I like the openness and light of a skoolie. At the same time, though, I didn't like the naked 2x4 lumber look. I'm pretty happy with how the bulkhead ended up once I jigsawed a circle out of it; now there's still a feeling of connectedness between the two areas, and it kind of looks like a climbing wall, which is sort of in line with the backpackerish ethos of this project:



The bulkhead makes it pretty cozy when you're inside the bunk, too, see? I'm gonna do the same thing on the other side, soon as I cut up more pallets out of the stack in the back yard:



All right, so here's the bench up front when it's in bench mode, with no cushion on it. The bulkhead makes it kind of nice because if you want to grab a book from the shelf, make some coffee on the propane stove in the back, whatever, you can sit there and face the front and have something to lean back on:



Here's the bench when you flip it from the front hinges and put it in platform mode. It's kind of jank right now because the only plywood I had was this pretty decent piece I found in a free pile, but it doesn't cover the whole thing.



And obviously the flipped platform doesn't function as the complete bed, either. The bench is only 28 inches from windows to front edge, so when you flip it, you get a platform of 56 inches. Hence the bench-in-progress on the other side, see? Same size as the first bench.

Ah, but now you're looking at it, doing the math, maybe, and figuring out that in a 90" wide bus, there's a 56" platform and a 28" bench on the other side, which makes...84", which means there's a 6" gap between platform and bench, and sure enough, there it is, see? Well, the current plan is to throw hinges on the front of the second bench, connected to a piece of plywood that'll flip over onto the platform and close the gap. It only needs to cover six inches, and it won't bear that much weight; it'll be about where knees go when the whole thing has the futon pad thrown across it.

But here's the other, bigger, better plan with the new bench. I think the front area will be cool as a two-bench sitting space that converts into a big bed. It gives me most of the versatility I need for putting six people in a six-window bus. I need more, though! In the far back, in the storage area, I have a little sink and countertop where I can run a one-burner stove when I want to boil up some water, and that's cool. But I really want some space up front where I can do food prep if necessary. Also, with two benches, I want to be able to set up a table in between, in the aisle, so all six of us can sit on the benches and be able to eat -- not all the time, but on rainy days and in cold weather.

So here is the plan. The passenger-side bench will have no back on it. Plywood will cover the front 22 inches of the bench, leaving a six-inch gap against the wall. Now get this: in that gap rests a table with folding legs. The folded-up legs go against the wall, and the tabletop serves as the backrest! Like this:



Cool, so when you want to use the table, you can set it up in the aisle and everyone can sit down and eat. But you don't want to do it that way when you need to put the two-burner stove on the table and make food, because then the aisle is blocked and kids are trying to crawl under the table, or around it and over the benches, and they're making your life a nightmare and you start saying things you can't take back and then everyone talks about that time we all went camping in the bus and Dad flipped out and everyone ended up eating the jank meal he made on the propane stove in silence and we never went camping again. So what do you do?

You make it so that when you pull out the folding-leg table, you don't have to set up the legs. No: you put it right up against the windows, over the bench, and rest it on a shelf-ish thing constructed on the front half-bulkhead, and on blocks or something on the full midships bulkhead, and boom, you have a countertop. Still working out how it'll look, but it'll be something like this:



Will it work? Yes, I'm like, 85% sure it will. I have the folding table, and I'm gonna tear the leg assemblies off it and put it under a lightweight tabletop that I make myself -- one that fits the dimensions exactly. I'll have to tinker with the stuff that holds the table up when it's in countertop mode, but I'll figure that out. Will it be safe to set up in countertop mode while driving? No way -- this is just for when we're stationary and ready to make dinner. The cool thing is that I can leave it in countertop mode even when using the front benches as a bed. And I plan to put a cabinet up above it so that when I want to put the table away, I can just throw everything up into the cabinet and go. When the table is stowed, I of course need a way to fasten it down, probably just by strapping it to the chair rail.

Is it possible this will all be too complicated for regular use? Yes, that is possible. I know how it is with fold-down stuff like dinettes in campers that are supposed to turn into beds, but never do, because the table gets used all the time and nobody wants to move the junk they put there. But with this many people in a small bus, you have to just deal, you know? And I think the half-minute it will take to switch from bench to countertop to table will be worth the versatility when we need it.

And is it possible I watched too much Transformers as a kid? Yes.
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Old 02-14-2019, 10:29 AM   #28
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I LOVE everything about this bench/table design. The creative transformationality of it, the sketch of it (esp. the "some kind of shelf-ish thing"), the description of it in use, the prediction of how things will turn south when lil'uns are crawling around beneath the table....love everything about it. You, sir, are my kinda designer for sure. You've done quite a bit of work already so I'm sure you've experienced how the project grows organically to perfectly fit your needs.



Kudos, that's good stuff man.
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Old 02-14-2019, 01:04 PM   #29
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THIS is exactly why I would never buy a pre-built RV. You're taking the needs, interests, and aesthetics of your family and brainstorming a really creative, evolving layout! That's what the skoolie thing is all about.

LOL does anyone else's spellcheck change skoolie to skokie every time? You'd think my computer would know me by now.

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If I had a hot wire foam cutter, I'd slice the thing the long way to thin it out, and then throw the softer cot pad on top.
In upholstery class we always used a good electric meat carving knife for this.

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The inner lip of the shelf keeps the books in place, but it's important to have some other ballast up there to keep them from tipping forward where they form stacks and then slide out sideways.
Personally, I wouldn't rely on a lip to keep the books in place. I am a big fan of DOORS on upper cabinets, a predilection I developed while driving cross country in Buster. Some of the best places to go have some of the worst roads leading to them, and lots of items, books in particular, have an interesting ability to jump over lips and end up flying. Even some sort of netting would work, but my own experience has been that there isn't a lip high enough to guarantee things stay where I put them.

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Will it work? Yes, I'm like, 85% sure it will.
And if it doesn't, you'll modify it into another great idea.
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Old 02-14-2019, 02:12 PM   #30
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I LOVE everything about this bench/table design. The creative transformationality of it, the sketch of it (esp. the "some kind of shelf-ish thing"), the description of it in use, the prediction of how things will turn south when lil'uns are crawling around beneath the table....love everything about it. You, sir, are my kinda designer for sure. You've done quite a bit of work already so I'm sure you've experienced how the project grows organically to perfectly fit your needs.
Thanks man! I have the feeling a lot of us here are working out projects out in the same spirit and I'm just giving voice to some of the more ridiculous aspects of it all.

So far there definitely has been a lot of trial and error -- in fact, the "bench in progress" is replacing a crappier bench I built that was only 17 inches deep, and folded out double to meet the other bench when it was flipped. It seemed like an elegant way to make some unobtrusive seating, keep space to let the kids play on the floor, and still have a good sleeping platform...but in reality, it was just an uncomfortable bench that nobody wanted to sit on, and the kids didn't want to play on the floor; everybody was just crowding onto the other, more comfortable bench.

I think it was ECCB who said to someone, in some post, to just do things and not be too afraid of screwing stuff up. Whoever said it, the advice has stuck with me, so...onward, ad astra, ad infinitum, ad nauseam, amen.
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Old 02-14-2019, 02:26 PM   #31
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THIS is exactly why I would never buy a pre-built RV. You're taking the needs, interests, and aesthetics of your family and brainstorming a really creative, evolving layout! That's what the skoolie thing is all about.
Thanks! I feel the same way about having the flexibility to customize things. Plus I just don't like how the interior of an RV feels like it's all made from plastic, and how their designers can't get away from painting random wavy shapes on their exteriors.

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I wouldn't rely on a lip to keep the books in place. I am a big fan of DOORS on upper cabinets, a predilection I developed while driving cross country in Buster. Some of the best places to go have some of the worst roads leading to them, and lots of items, books in particular, have an interesting ability to jump over lips and end up flying. Even some sort of netting would work, but my own experience has been that there isn't a lip high enough to guarantee things stay where I put them.
Yeah. The lip was a total failure. I haven't really solved it. And you're right about a door being the best solution. I'm going to try other things, though, because I like the idea of the bookshelf being visible. I value the stories in the books up there, and I feel like if they're visible, we're more likely to read them, and to be conscious of them surrounding us. So it's kind of a values thing.

One of my other closely-held values, though, is avoiding getting hit in the head with books. I've been thinking about doing something with a bungee cord that makes it look less like a bungee cord, but it's a pretty half-baked idea. Maybe in the end I'll do a cabinet door with a big window in it...depends on what kinds of materials come my way.
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Old 02-14-2019, 02:35 PM   #32
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Maybe in the end I'll do a cabinet door with a big window in it...depends on what kinds of materials come my way.
How about cargo netting, or some kind of screen material, attached to a door frame?
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Old 02-14-2019, 02:38 PM   #33
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How about cargo netting, or some kind of screen material, attached to a door frame?
Ah yeah, that's a pretty good idea -- over in Don's Busted Flush thread, I think he mentioned he was going to use some kind of wire mesh in frames for some of his cabinet doors!

My mind immediately goes to the roll of chicken wire I've had in the "materials" pile forever, and I think it could either be awesome, or it could look like some kind of Joanna Gaines-influenced nightmare. Might try it and see.
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Old 02-14-2019, 04:19 PM   #34
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I used "roll front desk" type doors on the cupboards over the sink and nylon mesh with zippers and Velcro and a pliable tag board bottom for my linen closet above the bed--it all gives when I accidentally stand (sit) up under it.
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Old 02-14-2019, 06:30 PM   #35
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I really like the idea of the 'suitcase' overhead cupboard - that should save some bruising - lol - clever roll up doors as well
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Old 02-14-2019, 08:06 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by desertfather View Post
Thanks man! I have the feeling a lot of us here are working out projects out in the same spirit and I'm just giving voice to some of the more ridiculous aspects of it all.

So far there definitely has been a lot of trial and error -- in fact, the "bench in progress" is replacing a crappier bench I built that was only 17 inches deep, and folded out double to meet the other bench when it was flipped. It seemed like an elegant way to make some unobtrusive seating, keep space to let the kids play on the floor, and still have a good sleeping platform...but in reality, it was just an uncomfortable bench that nobody wanted to sit on, and the kids didn't want to play on the floor; everybody was just crowding onto the other, more comfortable bench.

I think it was ECCB who said to someone, in some post, to just do things and not be too afraid of screwing stuff up. Whoever said it, the advice has stuck with me, so...onward, ad astra, ad infinitum, ad nauseam, amen.
Maybe- that does sound like something I'd say!
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Old 02-15-2019, 05:51 AM   #37
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I used "roll front desk" type doors on the cupboards over the sink and nylon mesh with zippers and Velcro and a pliable tag board bottom for my linen closet above the bed--it all gives when I accidentally stand (sit) up under it.
Jack
Wow, Jack, those roll-front cabinets look great, and I've never seen a soft-side cabinet like that anywhere else. Such cool ideas!
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Old 02-15-2019, 09:34 PM   #38
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Thanks for the update! I like the porthole in the bulkhead, and I REALLY like the whole table/bench/bed/countertop/bar/transforming Camaro thing you got going on.......can't wait to see the finished version.

You write very well, and I enjoy your posts.....and then something like this comes flying out of left field....

Quote:
Originally Posted by desertfather View Post
and kids are trying to crawl under the table, or around it and over the benches, and they're making your life a nightmare and you start saying things you can't take back and then everyone talks about that time we all went camping in the bus and Dad flipped out and everyone ended up eating the jank meal he made on the propane stove in silence and we never went camping again.
.....and I start laughing, because it reminded me so much of the camping trips or vacation journeys with my stepdad while growing up......(think Clark Griswald on speed). EVERYTHING turned into drama.
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Old 02-15-2019, 09:40 PM   #39
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Join Date: Jun 2016
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Year: 1997
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ol trunt View Post
I used "roll front desk" type doors on the cupboards over the sink and nylon mesh with zippers and Velcro and a pliable tag board bottom for my linen closet above the bed--it all gives when I accidentally stand (sit) up under it.
Jack
Those roll front doors are really nice, Jack. Early on in my design process i thought of using those, but they were about 4 times more than I wanted to spend. Then, I researched making my own, and they were about 3 times more than I wanted to spend.

Well done.
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Old 02-17-2019, 09:12 AM   #40
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Those slat roll doors are called tambour doors. Nice to know my years as an antique dealer taught me something.
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